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Is it not better...to lead a good fashion than to follow a bad one? Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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Is it not better...to lead a good fashion than to follow a bad one?

Anna Sewell (1820-1878)
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 4:44:44 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Is it not better...to lead a good fashion than to follow a bad one?

Anna Sewell (1820-1878)



The above quote comes from Black Beauty--Chapter XLVI--Jakes and the Lady.

Black Beauty
was Anna Sewell's only novel. It was written between 1871 and 1877 whilst she was an invalid confined. The autobiography is about a horse and was first publishing on November 24th, 1877.

In reading the above quote one would think she was talking about the propriety of a hat, the cut of a dress or the smartness of one's evening wear instead of speaking about the cruelty towards a hard working horse. Shame on you



One day, I was loaded more than usual, and part of the road was a steep uphill: I used all my strength, but I could not get on, and was obliged continually to stop. This did not please my driver, and he laid his whip on badly, "Get on, you lazy fellow," he said, "or I'll make you." Again I started the heavy load, and struggled on a few yards; again the whip came down, and again I struggled forward. The pain of that great cart whip was sharp, but my mind was hurt quite as much as my poor sides. To be punished and abused when I was doing my very best was so hard, it took the heart out of me. A third time he was flogging me cruelly, when a lady stepped quickly up to him, and said in a sweet earnest voice,

"Oh! pray do not whip your good horse any more; I am sure he is doing all he can, and the road is very steep, I am sure he is doing his best."

"If doing his best won't get this load up, he must do something more than his best, that's all I know, ma'am," said Jakes.

"But is it not a very heavy load?" she said.

"Yes, yes, too heavy," he said, "but that's not my fault, the foreman came just as we were starting, and would have three hundred-weight more put on to save him trouble, and I must get on with it as well as I can." He was raising the whip again, when the lady said,

"Pray stop, I think I can help you if you will let me."

The man laughed.

"You see," she said, "you do not give him a fair chance; he cannot use all his power with his head held back as it is with that bearing rein; if you would take it off, I am sure he would do better—do try it," she said persuasively, "I should be very glad if you would."

"Well, well," said Jakes, with a short laugh, "anything to please a lady of course. How far would you wish it down, ma'am?"

"Quite down, give him his head altogether."

The rein was taken off, and in a moment I put my head down to my very knees. What a comfort it was! Then I tossed it up and down several times to get the aching stiffness out of my neck.

"Poor fellow! that is what you wanted," said she, patting and stroking me with her gentle hand; "and now if you will speak kindly to him and lead him on, I believe he will be able to do better."

Jakes took the rein—"Come on, Blackie." I put down my head, and threw my whole weight against the collar; I spared no strength; the load moved on, and I pulled it steadily up the hill, and then stopped to take breath.

The lady had walked along the footpath, and now came across into the road. She stroked and patted my neck, as I had not been patted for many a long day. "You see he was quite willing when you gave him the chance; I am sure he is a fine-tempered creature, and I dare say has known better days; you won't put that rein on again, will you?" for he was just going to hitch it up on the old plan.

"Well, ma'am, I can't deny that having his head has helped him up the hill, and I'll remember it another time, and thank you, ma'am; but if he went without a bearing rein, I should be the laughing stock of all the carters; it is the fashion, you see."

"Is it not better," she said, "to lead a good fashion, than to follow a bad one? A great many gentlemen do not use bearing reins now; our carriage horses have not worn them for fifteen years, and work with much less fatigue than those who have them; besides," she added in a very serious voice, "we have no right to distress any of God's creatures without a very good reason; we call them dumb animals, and so they are, for they cannot tell us how they feel, but they do not suffer less because they have no words, but I must not detain you now; I thank you for trying my plan with your good horse, and I am sure you will find it far better than the whip. Good day," and with another soft pat on my neck she stepped lightly across to the path, and I saw her no more.

"That was a real lady, I'll be bound for it," said Jakes to himself, "she spoke just as polite as if I was a gentleman, and I'll try her plan, uphill, at any rate;" and I must do him the justice to say, that he let my rein out several holes, and going uphill after that, he always gave me my head; but the heavy loads went on. Good feed and fair rest will keep up one's strength under full work, but no horse can stand against over-loading; and I was getting so thoroughly pulled down from this cause, that a younger horse was bought in my place. I may as well mention here, what I suffered at this time from another cause. I had heard horses speak of it, but had never myself had experience of the evil; this was a badly-lighted stable; there was only one very small window at the end, and the consequence was, that the stalls were almost dark.



Black Beauty by Anna Sewell


Please thank Wikiquote for the quote in context and the complete story to read at your leisure.


peace out, >^,,^<
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 4:55:41 AM
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Location: the city by the bay
Friday, December 12, 2008

Banned, Censored, Challenged: Black Beauty

Black Beauty was banned in South Africa because it used the words "black" and "beauty" in the title. Of course, there aren't even any black people in the book, since it is set in 19th century England. During apartheid, the censor in South Africa assumed the book was some kind of black rights novel. He did not even read it.

The book is actually about animal rights and Black Beauty is a horse. It was written in 1877 by Anna Sewell.


[ Originally published in The Daily Hampshire Gazette on: Wednesday, October 03, 2007 ]

NORTHAMPTON.........And anyone familiar with apartheid in South Africa would understand why its racist regime banned Donald Woods' 1978 book "Biko," about black martyr Stephen Biko, but, yes, "Black Beauty" was banned there too, in 1965, simply because of its title.



Please thank http://dangerouspages.blogspot.com for the the first set of information and http://www.forbeslibrary.org for the year Black Beauty was banned as well as the additional information.


peace out, >^,,^<
tootsie
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 5:20:16 AM

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Joined: 9/11/2010
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[quote=kitten]

"In reading the above quote one would think she was talking about the propriety of a hat, the cut of a dress or the smartness of one's evening wear instead of speaking about the cruelty towards a hard working horse.
"

I thought exactly that, and how strange that she (Anna Sewell) would say such a trivial thing, so I was delighted to read your two informative posts about her quote and to learn the real reason behind the words. Thanks, kitten.
1dreamer
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 12:00:13 PM
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Joined: 4/14/2011
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Location: by the lake
Horses are the most noble animals that exist.
Are unicorns still here?
Hear "On horseback" theme from Mike Oldfield,
*
floyd
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 1:21:47 PM
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Location: United States
That's right about nobility. The great thing for humans is getting to share that nobility when we ride.

Thanks for the thought.

floyd
jcbarros
Posted: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 2:12:13 PM

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Context is all Applause thanks, Kitten.
jmacann
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 6:47:28 PM
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Joined: 2/20/2011
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Location: Spain
For its own sake -thanks for sharing.
kitten
Posted: Thursday, September 29, 2011 7:01:02 PM
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Joined: 12/28/2009
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Location: the city by the bay
Toots,

I, too, thought exactly that when I first read to quote. So off to see from where it came.

Imagine my surprise to find she was talking about cruelty to animals and to find this book is also on the "banned books list."

I also wondered if the quote was put there as an homage to "Banned Books Week?"


peace out, >^,,^<
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