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close the barn door after the horse has bolted Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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close the barn door after the horse has bolted

To try to prevent or rectify a problem after the damage has already been done. More...

johnsy
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 3:36:06 AM

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The UK variation uses "stable door" for "Barn door".
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 3:53:26 AM

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close the barn door after the horse has bolted — To try to prevent or rectify a problem after the damage has already been done.
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 3:53:27 AM

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Idiom of the Day
close the barn door after the horse has bolted — To try to prevent or rectify a problem after the damage has already been done.
thar
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 4:34:01 AM

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For anybody confused as to how the horse 'bolting the door' fits into this, it doesn't.
It isn't that sort of bolt.


If a horse bolts, it runs away at speed.

for a horse - run away uncontrollably (normally because they have been frightened by something)
for a prisoner, for example - run away to escape, or avoid getting into trouble
for a plant - grown very fast and put out seed, before a gardener wants this to happen
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 5:18:47 AM

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There is a Korean proverb similar to this.
Fix the cowshed after losing the cow.
coag
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 3:30:42 PM

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thar wrote:
For anybody confused as to how the horse 'bolting the door' fits into this, it doesn't.
It isn't that sort of bolt.


If a horse bolts, it runs away at speed.

for a horse - run away uncontrollably (normally because they have been frightened by something)
for a prisoner, for example - run away to escape, or avoid getting into trouble
for a plant - grown very fast and put out seed, before a gardener wants this to happen

I knew of "mechanical bolt" and "lightning bolt" and I wondered what "bolt" had to do with horses.

The etymology of these three "bolt" meanings is the same:
Old English bolt "short, stout arrow with a heavy head;" also "crossbow for throwing bolts," from Proto-Germanic *bultas (source also of Old Norse bolti, Danish bolt, Dutch bout, German Bolzen), perhaps originally "arrow, missile," and from PIE *bheld- "to knock, strike" (Online Etymology Dictionary)




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monamagda
Posted: Sunday, July 14, 2019 5:32:41 PM

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