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Daemon
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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ferocious

(adjective) Extremely aggressive or violent.

Synonyms: fierce, furious, savage

Usage: There were rumors that Miller's guard dog was as feriocious as they come, but in reality he was just a docile hound.
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 2:57:01 AM

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Joined: 1/28/2015
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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India

Word of the Day
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ferocious
Definition: (adjective) Extremely aggressive or violent.
Synonyms: fierce, furious, savage
Usage: There were rumors that Miller's guard dog was as feriocious as they come, but in reality he was just a docile hound.
taurine
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 3:55:41 AM

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Joined: 4/20/2016
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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
The defender's dog having bitten pursuer, the defender is liable in reparation, in respect that there was no fault on the part of the pursuer, and said dog was vicious, ferocious, and dangerous.

It is no doubt quite true that a man is entitled to keep a ferocious dog for the protection of his premises, and even to turn it loose during the night.

[T]he pursuer had no right to be where he was, and therefore the obligation incumbent on the owner of the ferocious dog was different from what it would have been had he had such right.

[T]he defendant did not perform or regard his said promise (that is, that the horse did not exceed five years old, and was sound etc., and free from vice) but thereby deceived and defrauded plaintiff in this, to wit, that the said horse, at the time of the making of the said promise, was not free from vice, but, on the contrary thereof, was then very vicious, restive, ungovernable, and ferocious.

The defendant told the Police that he had been the victim of a ferocious attack although he did not have any apparent injuries. (If medical staff is known to the alleged victim, he sometimes can make use of oil paint and apply it to his face to show his alleged injuries - added by taurine.)
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 8:08:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/1/2017
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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Daemon wrote:
ferocious

(adjective) Extremely aggressive or violent.

Synonyms: fierce, furious, savage

Usage: There were rumors that Miller's guard dog was as feriocious as they come, but in reality he was just a docile hound.
Aamir Sohail Dogar
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 9:30:51 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/29/2019
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Location: Nicosia, Lefkosia, Cyprus
GREAT!
thar
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 10:32:32 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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ferocious
1640s, from Latin ferocis, oblique case of ferox "fierce, wild-looking," from ferus "wild" (from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast") + -ox (genitive -ocis), a suffix meaning "looking or appearing" (cognate with Greek ōps "eye, sight;" from PIE root *okw- "to see").


Latin
Adjective
ferōx (genitive ferōcis); third declension

wild, bold, fierce
defiant, arrogant


Descendants
English: ferocious
French: féroce
Italian: feroce
Portuguese: feroz
Spanish: feroz

also feral
Borrowed from Middle French féral, from fer + -al, or borrowed from a Late Latin ferālis, from Latin ferus (“wild”).

fierce
- Middle English borrowed from Old French fers (“wild", "ferocious”), nominative of fer, from Latin ferus (“wild", "untamed”)

ferity
Borrowed from Latin feritas, from ferus (“wild”).
The quality or fact of being wild or in a wild state; wildness, brutishness.

and treacle!

mid-14c., "medicinal compound, antidote for poison," from Old French triacle "antidote, cure for snake-bite" (c. 1200), from Vulgar Latin *triacula, from Latin theriaca, from Greek theriake (antidotos) "antidote for poisonous wild animals," from fem. of theriakos "of a wild animal,"
from therion "wild animal," diminutive of ther (genitive theros) "wild animal," from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast."

coag
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 3:35:37 PM

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Joined: 3/27/2010
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"Ferocious" reminds me of "ferrum", but the words are not related.

Online Etymology says that the origin of "ferrum" is not known. That's strange.
We should know where the name of such an important material came from.

"Brass" too, the origin of the name obscure.
thar
Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2019 4:54:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 23,388
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Ah, that is because metal-working is magic!

wiktionary has a go at being a bit more detailed, at least


Quote:
Etymology
A substrate loanword from an unknown source. According to de Vaan, possibly from a Phoenician dialect[1], 𐤁𐤓𐤆𐤋‎ (brzl //barzel//, “iron”), akin to Aramaic פַּרְזְלָא‎ / ܦܪܙܠܐ‎ (parzəlā, “iron”), Akkadian 𒀭𒁇 (/parzillu/, “iron”), Ugaritic 𐎁𐎗𐎏𐎍 (brḏl, “iron”), considered of Anatolian origin[2]. The word could have entered Latin through Etruscan.[3]



brass (adjective brazen) I always associate with to braze (not weld), fire.
Apparently that is an option, although not certain. Not deep roots, though - just back to Gothic. Saying 'Possibly the same place of origin for both ferro and brass' seems to be pushing beyond the limited facts, though.

Quote:
Etymology
From Middle English bras, bres, from Old English bræs (“brass, bronze”), origin uncertain. Perhaps representing a backformation from Proto-Germanic *brasnaz (“brazen”), from or related to *brasō (“fire, pyre”). Compare Old Norse and Icelandic bras (“solder”), Icelandic brasa (“to harden in the fire”), Swedish brasa (“made small fire”), Danish brase (“to fry”); French braser ("to solder"; > English braise) from the same Germanic root. Compare also Middle Dutch braspenninc ("a silver coin", literally, "silver-penny"; > Dutch braspenning), Old Frisian bress (“copper”), Middle Low German bras (“metal, ore”).


braise
Quote:
From Middle French bresze, from Old French breze (“ember, burning coal, gleed”), perhaps from Gothic *𐌱𐍂𐌰𐍃𐌰 (*brasa, “glowing coal”), from Proto-Germanic *brasō (“gleed, crackling coal”), Proto-Indo-European *bʰres- (“to crack, break, burst”). Cognate with Swedish brasa (“to roast”), Icelandic brasa (“to harden by fire”).




"It ain't what you do, it's the way that you do it - that's what gets results." Whistle


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