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When he applied his mind to a problem, it became at once an enthralling arena, in which there went whirling a chariot-race of... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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When he applied his mind to a problem, it became at once an enthralling arena, in which there went whirling a chariot-race of ideas and inventive fancies.

Herbert N. Casson (1869-1951)
kitten
Posted: Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:41:01 AM
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Daemon wrote:
When he applied his mind to a problem, it became at once an enthralling arena, in which there went whirling a chariot-race of ideas and inventive fancies.

Herbert N. Casson (1869-1951)



The above quote is from The History of the Telephone--1910--Chapter 1--THE BIRTH OF THE TELEPHONE.It appears Mr. Casson is describing a very determined man. It also seems that the book may have been a small one. I base this on the page numbers which I left intact.


As he was then in England, his first step was naturally to visit Sir Charles Wheatstone, the best known English expert on telegraphy. Sir Charles had earned his title by many inventions. He was a simple-natured scientist, and treated Bell with the utmost kindness. He showed him an ingenious talking-machine that had been made by Baron de Kempelin. At this time Bell was twenty-two and unknown; Wheatstone was sixty-seven and famous. And the personality of the veteran scientist made so vivid a picture upon the mind of the impressionable young Bell that the grand passion of science became henceforth the master-motif of his life.

From this summit of glorious ambition he was thrown, several months later, into the depths of grief and despondency. The White Plague had come to the home in Edinburgh and taken away his two brothers. More, it had put its mark upon the young inventor himself. Nothing but







-19-



a change of climate, said his doctor, would put him out of danger. And so, to save his life, he and his father and mother set sail from Glasgow and came to the small Canadian town of Brantford, where for a year he fought down his tendency to consumption, and satisfied his nervous energy by teaching ``Visible Speech'' to a tribe of Mohawk Indians.

By this time it had become evident, both to his parents and to his friends, that young Graham was destined to become some sort of a creative genius. He was tall and supple, with a pale complexion, large nose, full lips, jet-black eyes, and jet-black hair, brushed high and usually rumpled into a curly tangle. In temperament he was a true scientific Bohemian, with the ideals of a savant and the disposition of an artist. He was wholly a man of enthusiasms, more devoted to ideas than to people; and less likely to master his own thoughts than to be mastered by them. He had no shrewdness, in any commercial sense, and very little knowledge of the small practical details of ordinary living. He was always intense, always absorbed. When he applied his







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mind to a problem, it became at once an enthralling arena, in which there went whirling a chariot-race of ideas and inventive fancies.


Casson, Herbert N. . The History of the Telephone

Please thank http://etext.virginia.edu for the quote in context and the story to read at your leisure.


peace out, >^,,^<
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