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[accent] enthusiastic Options
Fruity
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 8:09:08 AM

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Location: Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa, Japan
en・thu・si・as・tic

Which syllable do you stress in 'enthusiastic'?

https://youtu.be/n3UOSYvFic8 (3:34 / 11:37)
In this video, Lucy stressed the second syllable.
thar
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 8:32:31 AM

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Yes, that is the normal Southern English pronunciation.

En-thuse (verb)
En-thus -i-asm (noun, feeling)
En-thus-i-ast (noun, person)
En-thus-i-ast-ic (adjective)
En-thus-i-ast -ic ' ly (adverb)

Second and fourth syllables of the adjective. More stress on the fourth, but if the fourth is stressed, then so is the second, because you tend to stress alternate syllables. Although the -ast and -asm are not strongly stressed.
en- is a prefix, and in this case is not stressed.eg
enjoy, engage, enroll

There aren't any other -thuse words because it is not a common root.

It used to mean divine inspiration: -theo as in belief/god. You have 'god' inside you - you are enthusiastic! Now it just means you are happy and excited about things.


I don't think there is regional variation in which syllable is stressed - we'll have to see if anyone gives a different version. Think
FounDit
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 11:21:32 AM

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American English has it stressed exactly the same.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 2:11:54 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello Fruity.

In most dictionaries, the stress is shown by a mark BEFORE the syllable. A minor stress is a mark below the line (subscript) and a major stress is a mark above the line (superscript).

There is a slight difference in the English spoken in the south-east of England - the "en" is pronounced as "in", for some reason. Most people in Britain (and in America) pronounce the "en" as "en".
Americans do not pronounce the "u" the same way as the woman in your video does. It's not very different, but slightly /u/ rather than /ju:/

Britain:
/ɛnˌθjuːzɪˈæstɪk/ or /ɪnˌθjuːzɪˈæstɪk/......enthusiastic

American
/ɛnˌθu ziˈæs tɪk)/......enthusiastic
palapaguy
Posted: Monday, May 27, 2019 10:36:29 PM

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FounDit wrote:
American English has it stressed exactly the same.


Agree. In that respect it's a bit of a curiosity, which is another example of equal stress.
Fruity
Posted: Friday, May 31, 2019 12:14:14 PM

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Location: Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa, Japan
Thanks so much for the replies, everyone.
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