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a bit beyond (one's) ken Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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a bit beyond (one's) ken

Advanced beyond one's ability to understand or make sense of the subject matter or task at hand. More...

KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 12:28:09 AM

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a bit beyond (one's) ken — Advanced beyond one's ability to understand or make sense of the subject matter or task at hand.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 10:30:34 AM

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Daemon wrote:
a bit beyond (one's) ken

Advanced beyond one's ability to understand or make sense of the subject matter or task at hand. More...

tomcrosson
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 6:14:48 PM

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Have not heard that particular phrase. However, I do recall the phrase "Over one's head!"

{= MTS =}
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:57:18 AM

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a bit beyond (one's) ken — Advanced beyond one's ability to understand or make sense of the subject matter or task at hand.
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 12:57:18 AM

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a bit beyond (one's) ken — Advanced beyond one's ability to understand or make sense of the subject matter or task at hand.
thar
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 2:32:10 AM

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The verb to ken is common in dialect, although not standard Southern English.

But the noun 'ken' survives in this phrase in standard British English.

Quote:
Northern and Scottish dialects from Middle English kennen, from Old English cennan (“make known, declare, acknowledge”) originally “to make known”, causative of cunnan (“to become acquainted with, to know”), from Proto-Germanic *kannijaną, causative of *kunnaną (“be able”), from which comes the verb can. Cognate with West Frisian kenne (“to know; recognise”), Dutch kennen (“to know”), German kennen (“to know, be acquainted with someone/something”), Norwegian Bokmål kjenne, Norwegian Nynorsk kjenna, Old Norse kenna (“to know, perceive”), Swedish känna (“to know, feel”). See also: can, con.

The noun meaning “range of sight” is a nautical abbreviation of present participle kenning.




Also an old radio comedy



The 'ken' of the title is Kenneth Horne. Not Williams.
A later show was 'Round the Horne'.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 7:38:32 AM

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What's the meaning of the phrase 'Beyond our ken'?

Beyond our understanding.

What's the origin of the phrase 'Beyond our ken'?

The word ken, meaning understanding or perception, is now rarely used outside Scotland. The first references to 'beyond our ken' aren't from the UK though but from America. The earliest I can find is in the Gettysburg newspaper The Republican Banner, in November 1834:

"But you in a strange mood to-day, and since the balloon is beyond our ken, you to dream of a flight through the air..."


www.phrases.org.uk › meanings
'Beyond our ken' - meaning and origin. - The Phrase Finder
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 10:39:01 AM

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a bit beyond (one's) ken — Advanced beyond one's ability to understand or make sense of the subject matter or task at hand.


I would suggest that the description for this include mention of it * not * being derogatory -- if that's true.
New one for me, BTW.
coag
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2020 5:31:53 PM

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tomcrosson wrote:
Have not heard that particular phrase. However, I do recall the phrase "Over one's head!"
{= MTS =}

Over My Head, Fleetwood Mac
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