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Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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dolorous

(adjective) Marked by or exhibiting sorrow, grief, or pain.

Synonyms: lachrymose, weeping, tearful

Usage: She always speaks with a wailing, dolorous voice—you are nervously expecting her to burst into tears every moment.
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 2:37:33 AM

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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Word of the Day
dolorous
Definition: (adjective) Marked by or exhibiting sorrow, grief, or pain.
Synonyms: lachrymose, weeping, tearful
Usage: She always speaks with a wailing, dolorous voice—you are nervously expecting her to burst into tears every moment.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 4:58:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/1/2017
Posts: 2,135
Neurons: 390,767
Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Daemon wrote:
dolorous

(adjective) Marked by or exhibiting sorrow, grief, or pain.

Synonyms: lachrymose, weeping, tearful

Usage: She always speaks with a wailing, dolorous voice—you are nervously expecting her to burst into tears every moment.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 6:16:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,115
Neurons: 81,224
I remember being in a very small Spanish town with a toothache, and scrabbling for my Latin and French to remember pain = dolor, to explain in a tiny backstreet chemist's shop what I needed. And happily got! Drool


Now I wonder if I was actually telling him I was grieving for my tooth! Whistle

dolor
Quote:

English
Alternative forms
dolour (British)

Etymology
Borrowed from Anglo-Norman dolour, mainland Old French dolor (modern douleur), from Latin dolor (“pain, grief”).

Noun
dolor (countable and uncountable, plural dolors)

(literary) Sorrow, grief, misery or anguish.
A unit of pain used to theoretically weigh people's outcomes.



Quote:
pain
English

Etymology 1
Borrowed from Old French and Anglo-Norman peine, paine, from Latin poena (“punishment, pain”), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, “bloodmoney, weregild, fine, price paid, penalty”).
Compare Danish pine, German Pein, Dutch pijn, Afrikaans pyn. See also pine (the verb). Displaced native Old English teen.



The German term for pain - 'weh' became modern English woe - trouble.

Oh, woe is me = oy vey!

Quote:
English
Etymology
From Middle English wo, wei, wa, from Old English wā, wǣ, from Proto-Germanic *wai, whence also Dutch wee, German Weh, weh, Danish ve, Yiddish וויי‎ (vey).
Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *wai. Compare Latin vae, Albanian vaj, French ouais, Ancient Greek οὐαί (ouaí), Persian وای‎ (vây) (Turkish vay, a Persian borrowing), and Armenian վայ (vay).


Icelandic word for painful sársaukafullur - cognate sore
sár = wound.
English sore
Quote:
From Middle English sor, from Old English sār (“ache, wound”, noun) and sār (“painful, grievous”, adjective),
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 8:52:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 2,841
Neurons: 785,530
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States

Definition: (adjective) Marked by or exhibiting sorrow, grief, or pain.
Synonyms: lachrymose, weeping, tearful
Usage: She always speaks with a wailing, dolorous voice—you are nervously expecting her to burst into tears every moment.
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