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soporific Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, March 30, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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soporific

(adjective) Sleep inducing.

Synonyms: hypnagogic, somniferous

Usage: Even he is unable to withstand the soporific influence of the place, and is gradually falling asleep.
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, March 30, 2019 1:55:16 AM

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Word of the Day
soporific
Definition: (adjective) Sleep inducing.
Synonyms: hypnagogic, somniferous
Usage: Even he is unable to withstand the soporific influence of the place, and is gradually falling asleep.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Saturday, March 30, 2019 4:27:50 AM

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Daemon wrote:
soporific

(adjective) Sleep inducing.

Synonyms: hypnagogic, somniferous

Usage: Even he is unable to withstand the soporific influence of the place, and is gradually falling asleep.
taurine
Posted: Saturday, March 30, 2019 7:08:44 AM

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It may well be that the taking of a sedative or soporific drug will, in certain circumstances, be no answer, for example in a case of reckless driving...

Sas? Nic. Sassnitz. Rug, ja? Rugen. Telemark in Harzgerode.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Saturday, March 30, 2019 7:29:00 AM

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Definition: (adjective) Sleep inducing.
Synonyms: hypnagogic, somniferous
Usage: Even he is unable to withstand the soporific influence of the place, and is gradually falling asleep.
coag
Posted: Saturday, March 30, 2019 1:27:01 PM

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I couldn't think of any potential cognates of the word.

This is what the Online Etymology Dictionary says.

*swep-
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to sleep."

It forms all or part of: hypno-; hypnosis; hypnotic; hypnotism; insomnia; somni-; somnambulate; somniloquy; somnolence; somnolent; Somnus; sopor; soporific.□

Croatian, Serbian "san"="a sleep, dream" comes from the same Proto-Indo-European root. Polish "sen", Russian "сон", Czech "sen".


thar
Posted: Saturday, March 30, 2019 1:55:24 PM

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It is not a natural sleep, but an unnaturally induced one -

Quote:
Latin

Noun
sopor m (genitive sopōris); third declension

A deep sleep, sopor; sleep (in general); catalepsy.
The sleep of death; death.
(figuratively) Stupefaction; lethargy, stupor; drowsiness
(figuratively) Laziness, indifference.
(figuratively) Opium.
(figuratively) A sleeping potion or draught; opiate.
(figuratively) The temple (of the head).



but from the same root is the more common Romance origin word for sleep - somnus in Latin, cognates in French, Spanish, Romanian etc, and the English insomnia, somnabulist etc

++++++!

Quote:
Lithuanian

sãpnas m (plural sapnaĩ)

dream

Etymology
Proto-Indo-European *supnós, *swépnos (“dream”). Cognate to Latvian sapnis, Old Church Slavonic сънъ (sŭnŭ), Latin somnus, Ancient Greek ὕπνος (húpnos), Sanskrit स्वप्न (svapna), Old English swefn, Icelandic svefn.


(I think most of these are sleep, not dream.)

Old English
swefn


Quote:
From Proto-Germanic *swefnaz, from Proto-Indo-European *swepno-, an extension of *swep- (“sleep”). Cognate with Old Saxon sweƀan, Old Norse svefn (Icelandic svefn, Norwegian svevn, Swedish sömn); the Proto-Indo-European root also led to Ancient Greek ὕπνος (húpnos), Latin somnus, Old Irish suan, Old Church Slavonic сънъ (sŭnŭ), Russian сон (son), Latvian sapnis.


dream
Nān þing ne stent on mīnes swefnes weġe.
Nothing's gonna stand in the way of my dream.
Iċ eom þīn sōþ ġeworden swefn.
I'm your dream come true.


Old Norse

Quote:
Noun
svefn m

sleep

Etymology
From Proto-Germanic *swefnaz, from Proto-Indo-European *swepnos, an extension of *swep- (“sleep”). Cognate with Old Saxon sweƀan, Old English swefn, English sweven. The Indo-European root also led to Ancient Greek ὕπνος (húpnos), Latin somnus, Old Irish suan, Old Church Slavonic съпати (sŭpati), Russian спать (spatʹ), Latvian sapnis.



Descendants
Danish: søvn c
Faroese: svøvnur m
Icelandic: svefn m, svöfn m
Norwegian Bokmål: søvn
Norwegian Nynorsk: svevn m, søvn
Swedish: sömn c


also related Norse/Icelandic sofa = to sleep (nothing to do with Arabic divans!)
Proto-Germanic
Quote:

Descendants
Old English: swefan, āswefan
Middle English: asweven
English: asweve
Old Norse: sofa
Icelandic: sofa
Faroese: sova
Norwegian:
Norwegian Bokmål: sove
Norwegian Nynorsk: sova, sova
Old Swedish: sova
Swedish: sova
Old Danish: souæ
Danish: sove
Westrobothnian: sȯfwa, såva, soa
Jamtish: sovo
Elfdalian: såvå
Gutnish: syve
Scanian: søva
⇒ Old Norse: sofna (inchoative)
Icelandic: sofna
Faroese: sovna
Danish: sovne
Norwegian:
Norwegian Bokmål: sovne
Norwegian Nynorsk: sovna, sovne
Old Swedish: somna, sofna
Swedish: somna



All much more related than I expected.

but not related to sleep (to slip, waver|)

or dormir

Quote:
Latin
Etymology
From Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem- (“run, sleep”).[1][2]

Cognates include Old Church Slavonic дрѣмати (drěmati, “to drowse, doze”), Russian дрема́ть (dremátʹ), Ancient Greek δαρθάνω (darthánō, “I sleep”).



which, despite some superficial similarity, is not related to dream.

dream
Quote:
From Middle English dreme, from Old English drēam (“joy, pleasure, gladness, delight, mirth, rejoicing, rapture, ecstasy, frenzy, music, musical instrument, harmony, melody, song, singing, jubilation, sound of music”), from Proto-Germanic *draumaz, from earlier *draugmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰrowgʰ-mos, from *dʰrewgʰ- (“to deceive, injure, damage”). The sense of "dream", though not attested in Old English, may still have been present (compare Old Saxon drōm (“bustle, revelry, jubilation", also "dream”)), and was undoubtedly reinforced later in Middle English by Old Norse draumr (“dream”),


KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, March 31, 2019 12:13:18 AM

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Word of the Day
?
two-piece
Definition: (noun) A woman's very brief bathing suit.
Synonyms: bikini
Usage: Kristen changed into her two-piece and jumped into the pool.
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, March 31, 2019 12:13:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 7,673
Neurons: 3,525,857
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Word of the Day
?
two-piece
Definition: (noun) A woman's very brief bathing suit.
Synonyms: bikini
Usage: Kristen changed into her two-piece and jumped into the pool.
8BooksOfSengathe
Posted: Monday, April 1, 2019 3:39:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/30/2014
Posts: 491
Neurons: 15,690
Daemon wrote:
soporific

(adjective) Sleep inducing.

Synonyms: hypnagogic, somniferous

Usage: Even he is unable to withstand the soporific influence of the place, and is gradually falling asleep.



…..

A purring cat has a calming and soporific effect on people and animals.

Enjoy" BIBLE PAGES by Peridot Path " , via the blog button. :)
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