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Royal Greenwich Observatory Begins Broadcasting Hourly Time Signals (1924) Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Royal Greenwich Observatory Begins Broadcasting Hourly Time Signals (1924)

The Greenwich Time Signal, popularly known as "the pips," is a series of six short tones broadcast by many BBC radio stations at the end of each hour to mark the precise start of the following hour. Devised by Astronomer Royal Frank Dyson in 1924, the signal consists of six pips that occur on the five seconds leading up to the hour, with the beginning of the sixth pip marking the actual moment when the hour changes. After nearly 90 years of marking time, why might the pips soon be silenced? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 2:16:52 AM

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This Day in History
Royal Greenwich Observatory Begins Broadcasting Hourly Time Signals (1924)
The Greenwich Time Signal, popularly known as "the pips," is a series of six short tones broadcast by many BBC radio stations at the end of each hour to mark the precise start of the following hour. Devised by Astronomer Royal Frank Dyson in 1924, the signal consists of six pips that occur on the five seconds leading up to the hour, with the beginning of the sixth pip marking the actual moment when the hour changes.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 10:35:32 AM

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The Greenwich Time Signal, popularly known as "the pips," is a series of six short tones broadcast by many BBC radio stations at the end of each hour to mark the precise start of the following hour. Devised by Astronomer Royal Frank Dyson in 1924, the signal consists of six pips that occur on the five seconds leading up to the hour, with the beginning of the sixth pip marking the actual moment when the hour changes.

Interesting. Who knew? You, of course.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 10:46:37 AM

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Wilmar (USA) wrote:
The Greenwich Time Signal, popularly known as "the pips," is a series of six short tones broadcast by many BBC radio stations at the end of each hour to mark the precise start of the following hour. Devised by Astronomer Royal Frank Dyson in 1924, the signal consists of six pips that occur on the five seconds leading up to the hour, with the beginning of the sixth pip marking the actual moment when the hour changes.

Interesting. Who knew? You, of course.


The pips, most people in the UK know them.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 12:18:47 PM

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Tribute to the pips



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i52R_68NLRg

It is not a dirty joke - Sandi (Toksvig) is quite short, a running joke.
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