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Horace Walpole Coins the Word "Serendipity" (1754) Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Horace Walpole Coins the Word "Serendipity" (1754)

Defined as the faculty of making fortunate discoveries by accident, the word "serendipity" was first coined in 1754 by English author Horace Walpole in one of his more than 3,000 letters. In it, he explains that the root of his new word is taken from "The Three Princes of Serendip," a Persian fairytale about princes who "were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of." Past serendipitous discoveries include x-rays, helium, and what else? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2019 1:14:44 AM

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Horace Walpole Coins the Word "Serendipity" (1754)
Defined as the faculty of making fortunate discoveries by accident, the word "serendipity" was first coined in 1754 by English author Horace Walpole in one of his more than 3,000 letters. In it, he explains that the root of his new word is taken from "The Three Princes of Serendip," a Persian fairytale about princes who "were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of."
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2019 9:52:59 AM

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I did not know this coinage had its date of birth.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2019 12:32:42 PM

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Defined as the faculty of making fortunate discoveries by accident, the word "serendipity" was first coined in 1754 by English author Horace Walpole in one of his more than 3,000 letters. In it, he explains that the root of his new word is taken from "The Three Princes of Serendip," a Persian fairytale about princes who "were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things which they were not in quest of."
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