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What makes your city/town original? Options
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2009 9:55:57 AM
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Philadelphia is known for its Flower show, for the "Philadelphia Sound" (lush strings) of its orchestra and for always losing (until the Phillies won last year)

What's your town known for?
MiTziGo
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2009 12:11:48 PM
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I went to college in Philly (Philadelphia) and became involved in the Mural Arts Program there. The MPA has painted over 2,800 murals throughout the city, filling Philadelphia with beauty as well as providing residents with various social services.
Quote:
The Mural Arts Program began as part of the Philadelphia Anti-Graffiti Network and was initially developed to provide alternatives to young people who were engaged in graffiti and other minor crimes. While the program has grown substantially over the years, this fundamental objective still applies—to use mural-making and art education as a means of combating and preventing crime and its impact on communities.

Maps of mural locations are available as well as organized tours. When you're traveling through the city, make sure to keep your eyes open, you never know when you'll turn a corner and find a hidden gem!
kaliedel
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2009 3:42:30 PM
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Location: United States
I'm also from the Philly area. I think you have to bring up the role of Philly in the American Revolution as another reason it's "original." Its connection to Ben Franklin, and its role as our first capitol before DC, makes it unique (not to mention cheesesteaks.)
Sarachan
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2009 9:56:08 PM
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Though I live in the Philly area now, I'm originally from northeastern Tennessee. (Go VOLS!) I went to high school for awhile at the same school Dolly Parton graduated from several decades earlier. She had and has a great reputation in the area and is responsible for bringing some economic development to the region. She, like me, was in the school's marching band. Though I've never confirmed it rumor has it that she played the drums. Very uncharacteristic, I think,,,,,,,,
The place is unique because of its combination of blatant commercialism (if you have been through Pigeon Forge, TN on a Saturday in July you know what I mean!) and (ever-smaller) pockets of stunning natural beauty.
kaliedel
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:49:10 PM
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Here's another one, though not me: my mother was born in Manchester, UK, a city known for its strange population ratio - despite being in England, it has a larger Irish population than English population.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 9:40:06 PM
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Location: pennsylvania.
Joseph Glantz wrote:
Philadelphia is known for its Flower show, for the "Philadelphia Sound" (lush strings) of its orchestra and for always losing (until the Phillies won last year)

What's your town known for?


Local towns / famous place-types--

Boyertown Area School District-- raising Steve Burns from the riginal Blues Clues; Elaine Irwin from modeling, Pantene Pro-V commercials, and her marriage to John Melloncamp; the Rhoads Opera House Fire of 1908; racism :(
Gilbertsville-- Zern's Farmer's Market
Schwenksville-- The Philadelphia Folk Festival
Owen J. Roberts School District-- Daryl Hall of Hall & Oates
Lyons-- Lyons Fiddle Festival
Phoenixville-- its Colonial Theatre was featured in The Blob
Trappe-- birthplace of Jimmy Pop, lead singer for The Bloodhound Gang
Shillington-- residence of the late John Updike during the early years of his life

Some places are more well known than others, of course.
MiTziGo
Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 1:04:56 PM
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I used to live in New Rochelle, New York, former home and former burial place of Thomas Paine. Paine was an American pamphleteer and Revolutionary War hero who published the enormously successful pamphlet <i>Common Sense</i> (1776), which sold more than 500,000 copies. In it, he argued that the colonies had outgrown any need for English domination and urged the people to declare independence. Thomas Paine Cottage is now a National Historic Landmark and can be visited for a guided tour.
mustabir
Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 5:47:16 PM
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Location: Istanbul, Turkey
I live in Istanbul for a long time but my hometown is Gaziantep city which is located in the south-east of Turkey (it even has a border with Syria). It is generally well known for a special kind of pistachio (which is only grown around that region) named "Antepfistigi" and a dessert made of this pistachio which is called "Baklava" (which is the most favorite and popular dessert in all around Turkey). If you, one day, have to visit Turkey and come into a Turkish restaurant, you should no doubt ask and taste this dessert as it is one of the unique examples of Turkish kitchen indeed!

The other interesting info to mention about my hometown is that the city was entitled with the name of Gazi (which implies the Islamic type of a war veteran) in front of its original name "Antep" by Ataturk who is the founder of the current Turkish Republic. It was because of the bravery and success shown by the city's own people in the defense of the city during the World War I and later on during the Independence war of Turkey.
Drew
Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 8:51:04 PM
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prolixitysquared wrote:


Boyertown Area School District-- raising Steve Burns from the riginal Blues Clues; Elaine Irwin from modeling, Pantene Pro-V commercials, and her marriage to John Melloncamp; the Rhoads Opera House Fire of 1908; racism :(
Gilbertsville-- Zern's Farmer's Market
Schwenksville-- The Philadelphia Folk Festival
Owen J. Roberts School District-- Daryl Hall of Hall & Oates
Lyons-- Lyons Fiddle Festival
Phoenixville-- its Colonial Theatre was featured in The Blob
Trappe-- birthplace of Jimmy Pop, lead singer for The Bloodhound Gang
Shillington-- residence of the late John Updike during the early years of his life

Some places are more well known than others, of course.


Don't forget about Kennett Square, PA, "mushroom capital of the world!"
grunt grass
Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 11:02:21 PM
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Location: China
Xi'an--terra cotta warriors
Xiamen--gulangyu island
tia
Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2009 5:39:51 AM
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Location: Romania
I live in Iasi, a city from Romania... Everywhere you look you see a statue or a church... or a palace or a museum... like 100 or more... it has something from 19th century :D
risadr
Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2009 11:08:20 AM
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Location: PA, United States
Sunrise, FL (my hometown) is home to the Sawgrass Mills Mall, which is the largest outlet mall in the country.
Drew
Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2009 2:01:08 PM
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I went to college in Syracuse, NY, a city known for the invention of basketball's 24-second shot-clock, a tremendous amount of annual lake effect snow, the Carousel Mall, which is one of the largest in North America, the annual New York State Fair and many large, natural salt deposits, which have earned Syracuse the nickname "Salt City."
Sarachan
Posted: Monday, March 30, 2009 9:56:27 PM
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tia wrote:
I live in Iasi, a city from Romania... Everywhere you look you see a statue or a church... or a palace or a museum... like 100 or more... it has something from 19th century :D

You're so luck to live in such a beautiful-sounding place!
Sara
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 8:15:15 AM
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Drew wrote:
I went to college in Syracuse, NY, a city known for the invention of basketball's 24-second shot-clock, a tremendous amount of annual lake effect snow, the Carousel Mall, which is one of the largest in North America, the annual New York State Fair and many large, natural salt deposits, which have earned Syracuse the nickname "Salt City."


Hmmm. I think Salt Lake City, Utah might object.
Citiwoman
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 9:28:19 AM
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I am a Chicago native and it still feels like home in many ways. How is it special?
It is immaculate clean for a city its size.
Its restaurants are amazing, even by NYC standards.
If the wind is blowing in the right direction, the city smells like warm chocolate (chocolate factory).
It has more canal space than any city, including Venice.
The Cubs haven't won in about 100 years (longest suffering ever!), but in 2010 they will win the World Series.
You have your pick of several nice, sandy beaches right in the city.
It is known as "The Windy City" because of full-of-air politicians rather than any meteorological event.
The Chicago River is dyed bright green for St. Patrick's Day, and it stays green for awhile.
Mayor Daly is nicknamed "Mayor Daylily" for his perserverance in beautifying the city.
The city itself doesn't get nearly as much snow as its suburbs and other Great Lakes cities.

nxt_annawintour
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 10:25:39 AM
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I'm from the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton area and we are known for the tv show, "The Office." (Ah, if only working here were as fun as it looks on TV!)

Aside from that, we're known for our coal country and our love of deer (having the first day of hunting season off from school because it's considered a holiday - priceless!). Nothing spectacular, but it's what I call home. : )
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2009 9:46:12 AM
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nxt_annawintour wrote:
I'm from the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton area and we are known for the tv show, "The Office." (Ah, if only working here were as fun as it looks on TV!)

Aside from that, we're known for our coal country and our love of deer (having the first day of hunting season off from school because it's considered a holiday - priceless!). Nothing spectacular, but it's what I call home. : )


Actually, I'm pretty sure cable elevision was invented in Wilkes-Barre? It might also be the home offfice of Home Box Office.
Luftmarque
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2009 12:16:57 PM

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Location: Pau, Aquitaine, France
mustabir wrote:
I live in Istanbul for a long time but my hometown is Gaziantep city which is located in the south-east of Turkey (it even has a border with Syria). It is generally well known for a special kind of pistachio (which is only grown around that region) named "Antepfistigi" and a dessert made of this pistachio which is called "Baklava" (which is the most favorite and popular dessert in all around Turkey). If you, one day, have to visit Turkey and come into a Turkish restaurant, you should no doubt ask and taste this dessert as it is one of the unique examples of Turkish kitchen indeed!

I've been to Istanbul and can vouch for the wonders of Turkish pastries!

My new hometown, Fort Collins Colorado, is, in my mind, unique in its vibrant, eclectic mix of musical genres--that is what brought me here. Seen on a t-shirt at a local music store: "Sex & Drugs & Flatt And Scruggs"
NicoleR
Posted: Monday, April 6, 2009 10:56:10 AM
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Joined: 3/16/2009
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Location: Pennsylvania
Citiwoman wrote:
I am a Chicago native and it still feels like home in many ways. How is it special?
It is immaculate clean for a city its size.
Its restaurants are amazing, even by NYC standards.
If the wind is blowing in the right direction, the city smells like warm chocolate (chocolate factory).
It has more canal space than any city, including Venice.
The Cubs haven't won in about 100 years (longest suffering ever!), but in 2010 they will win the World Series.
You have your pick of several nice, sandy beaches right in the city.
It is known as "The Windy City" because of full-of-air politicians rather than any meteorological event.
The Chicago River is dyed bright green for St. Patrick's Day, and it stays green for awhile.
Mayor Daly is nicknamed "Mayor Daylily" for his perserverance in beautifying the city.
The city itself doesn't get nearly as much snow as its suburbs and other Great Lakes cities.


Don't forget about the Taste of Chicago, deep dish pizza, the Eli's Cheesecake factory, and Marshall Fields (RIP). And what's with changing the name of the Sears Tower to Willis Tower??
mrak
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2009 10:30:28 AM
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Location: Croatia
Rijeka, Croatia
-people that are rockers
-sea that is clean
-roads that are always full no matter there are not so much residents here
-the square that is red
-the Rijeka carnival
-many Italian people
-vicinity of mountains
-art cinema
-3 banks in 10 m diameter
-people playing the guitars in the roads just for fun
-all the girls dressed up fashionably
-all the boys with expensive phones
-big buildings in the suburbs
-you can see a young couple kissing on EVERY corner
-Christian, Jewish and Islam churches all nearby
-the combination of the above
Boo hoo!
fred
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2009 10:45:41 AM
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Location: United States
I am from Boulder, Colorado.


[image not available]

The buildings in the lower part of the image belong to the University of Colorado.
Rhondish
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2009 11:54:39 AM
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fred wrote:
I am from Boulder, Colorado.


[image not available]

The buildings in the lower part of the image belong to the University of Colorado.


I miss Colorado!!!!!!!! My dearest friend lives outside of Denver and I travel out West as often as I can. We met when she lived in the Boston Area. I am from New Hampshire. After her first visit to the White Mountains her comment to me was "Those are not mountains, they are hills!" I was argumentative until my first trip. My jaw still drops when I think about it. I had never seen anything so amazing in my life. Needless to say, we never argued the point again. I have also hiked and biked much of your incredible state and came very close to relocating until I spent the month of June there and missed the ocean. I could not believe the overwhelming homesickness, a nostalgia I had not felt since I was a young girl on my first trip away from home without my folks.
Luftmarque
Posted: Thursday, April 9, 2009 12:23:26 PM

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Rhondish wrote:
fred wrote:
I am from Boulder, Colorado.

I miss Colorado!!!!!!!! My dearest friend lives outside of Denver and I travel out West as often as I can. We met when she lived in the Boston Area. I am from New Hampshire. After her first visit to the White Mountains her comment to me was "Those are not mountains, they are hills!" I was argumentative until my first trip. My jaw still drops when I think about it. I had never seen anything so amazing in my life. Needless to say, we never argued the point again.

I got that same feeling when I visited Darjeeling in the foothills of the Himalaya--there are passes through those mountains that are substantially higher than the highest peak in the Western Hemisphere (maybe I should cross-post this to "the most amazing thing I know"). I am very happy to be living near the Colorado Rockies myself--there's a lot to be said for having a daily reminder of the true scale of nature.
elisa
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 6:07:37 AM
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Location: Venice
I can say that I was born in one of the most “original” cities in the world.
In fact, my motherland is Venice……yes, that one, Venice in Italy!Dancing

What makes it so special?

I’ll try to come up with a very limited list!Think

- Its own structure: it is built directly on the lagoon through the support of wooden stakes, it is formed by many highlands linked one to each other by more than 400 bridges, it is divided in “sestieri” – not in “quartieri” (quarters) such as the other cities, it has ancient narrow streets called calli (singular: calle, plural: calli)

-its singular landscape: a lagoon where the sea enters and goes out every 6 hours causing the famous “high water” phenomenon in wintertime.

-Its amazing history: the famous Republic of Venice, called the “Serenissima” (The Most Serene because there weren't rebellions against the governance)- who managed to preserve its independence for over 1000 years.

-its incomparable culture: in 1500 it has been one of the most important and fertile printing centers in Europe (Aldo Manuzio invented the pocket books and the Italics character that we are still using!!!) and it has been an artistic (Tiziano Vecellio, Paolo Veronese, Giovan Battista Tiepolo, Canaletto, Tintoretto, Lorenzo Lotto, Francesco Guardi) musical (Antonio Vivaldi, Benedetto Marcello, Baldassarre Galuppi) theatrical (Carlo Goldoni and Gozzi’s comedies) and literary (Pietro Bembo, Goldoni, Veronica Franco) referring point for centuries.

-its great personalities: Marco Polo, Paolo Sarpi, Carlo Scarpa, all the ones mentioned above...

- its particular products: Murano glass, Burano laces, fish recipes...

- its own dialect, which is the basis for the dialect of the whole Veneto region.

- its deep sense of mistery: hundreds and hundreds of legends rooted and hidden in the Venetian palaces and calli...

- its romanticism (just think to Giacomo Casanova….!!!)

-its fascinating atmosphere: a city hanging between the sea and the sky

-its light that inspired so many poets

etc. etc. etc.!!!!

P.S.= It is interesting for me to read information about Philadelphia in these posts, given that I’m going to move right there soon!!!;-)
Volcano
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 7:09:51 AM
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Let the photos talk... Istanbul



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fred
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 11:46:22 AM
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Very nice, Volcano!
cleopatra clover
Posted: Friday, April 17, 2009 11:40:31 AM
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Location: Malaysia
Yes, I'll agree with fred. Istanbul sure is a very nice city...and their people are very nice too. Applause
I come from Johor Bahru, the southern most city in Malaysia. Its also called the southern gateway to Malaysia.
Johor Bahru is also a twin city to Istanbul...the agreement was made more than ten years ago.
Muralista
Posted: Wednesday, August 5, 2009 7:16:57 PM
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Location: United Kingdom
I come from Lewes in East Sussex, England. It is a 'jewel beset by contentious jewellers', where several famous people have lived, which makes a town as much as how it looks, including:

Violet Gordon-Woodhouse- pioneer of the Early Music movement
Daisy Ashford- child writer of genius
Thomas Sackville- Elizabeth I's treasurer and favourite
John Evelyn- first writer on trees in English
Gundrada- Flemish wife of William de Warenne and co-founder of Lewes Priory
Gideon Mantell- discoverer of 'Iguanadon'-one of the first dinosaurs
Simon de Montfort- victor of Battle of Lewes, leading to House of Lords
Tom Paine Revolutionary author of 'Rights of Man', bridge designer.
Thomas Pelham-Holles corrupt aristocrat and Prime Minister
Dr.Richard Russell originator of 'the sea-cure'-led to seaside town building
Mary Shelley author of 'Frankenstein'; lierary encyclopaedist
Ed. P. Warren American classicist and antiquary
William de Warrenne 13th richest man in history; Norman knight and Justiciar.
John Marshall fellow antiquary of Perry Warren and partner
John Streater Revolutionary and pamphleteer and printer

I am currently painting a mural of these figures, which can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NK1AhRdA8IA


grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, August 5, 2009 7:27:04 PM
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Nice video, Muralista (what a befitting name)! I wish I had your talent.
nw3bk3y
Posted: Wednesday, August 5, 2009 9:26:29 PM
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I'm from Boston. I've lived here a while and I can tell you that one of the prettiest things about the city is the Charles river that forms the boundary between Boston and Cambridge.



[image not available]


We have a lot of history here as well: Paul Revere, Sam and John Adams all lived here and Benjamin Franklin was born here but moved to Philadelphia. The famous universities of Harvard and MIT are nearby as well. The city itself can be a bit congested and public transportation is lacking in parts.



The fall foliage is quite breathtaking though winters can be brutal and summers are often too humid (like right now!).



[image not available]


The harbor islands and beaches are a nice way to beat the summer heat.



People here are generally pretty smart and there's plenty of fun things to do. There is a certain kind of New England restraint that borders on rudeness and perhaps snobbery (probably because we are a city of 'intellectuals') but despite that you can make some good friends here if you look hard enough.
TB
Posted: Thursday, August 6, 2009 12:36:27 AM
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fred wrote:
I am from Boulder, Colorado.


Beautiful place, I lived there for one year and spent another twenty years in Denver. I've climbed the Flat Irons and I know that the N on the Nebraska Corn Husker's football helmets stands for Kknowledge.




Joseph Glantz wrote:
What's your town known for?


I was born in New York City and my home town is known for...uh...hmm...can't think of a dang thing.Think
Romany
Posted: Thursday, August 6, 2009 12:53:18 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
I only relocated to Shanghai from the more Southerly city of Ningbo (which isn't really famous for anything but conspicuous consumption) a couple of weeks ago, but am steadily falling in love with it more and more. It's famous for many things, including:

The first foreign trading concessions in China,
The Japanese invasion in WW2,
Being China's premier city of Arts and innovation,
Chiang Kai Sheck (damn! I can't remember how its said in English)- whose beautifully preserved home is a ten minute walk away from my place,
The architecture
The DJs,
The fusion of Western and Eastern fashion,
The plethora of Art Deco buildings
The French Quarter

and also for the air of mystery, raffishness, obscene wealth, pretentious nouveau riche people, and having been the scene of almost all movies and stories (especially of the spy genre) concerning modern China that were written/filmed before WW2. It's a magical city and there is a saying here: "If you can't get it in Shanghai, you can't get it. Period."
Kat
Posted: Thursday, August 6, 2009 10:14:13 AM
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Joined: 5/19/2009
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Oak Island, though not born here, has become my hometown.
It's a sweet little island off the coast of the southern
most tip of North Carolina. Unspoiled and unique by the
absence of high rise apts., condos, traffic, crime and crowds.
Beautiful southern facing beaches, where you can watch dolphins
at play many times a year, excellent fishing and golfing. Then
of course there is the low country cuisine...seafood mainly.
We can hear and smell the sea every day.
My husband and I moved here 25 years ago and feel it's the
the most unsullied spot on the eastern seaboard.
Gotta go...surfs' up.
cleopatra clover
Posted: Thursday, August 6, 2009 10:45:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/15/2009
Posts: 324
Neurons: 999
Location: Malaysia
Kat wrote :
Oak Island, though not born here, has become my hometown.
It's a sweet little island off the coast of the southern
most tip of North Carolina. Unspoiled and unique by the
absence of high rise apts., condos, traffic, crime and crowds.
Beautiful southern facing beaches, where you can watch dolphins
at play many times a year, excellent fishing and golfing. Then
of course there is the low country cuisine...seafood mainly.
We can hear and smell the sea every day.
My husband and I moved here 25 years ago and feel it's the
the most unsullied spot on the eastern seaboard.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Wow....so, you never have to go through traffic jams everyday to work? That really is a nice place to live in.

What makes my city original? Well, as I've posted before, I am from Johor Bahru, the southern most city in Malaysia. It is the Southern Gateway to Malaysia via Singapore. The food....we have local food and fruits....and mentioning about fruits, has anyone tried 'durian'?


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