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We know what we are, but know not what we may be. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 1:36:53 AM
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Yeah. So many things which we don’t know... Which one is really important and regrettable, Will?
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 2:14:18 AM

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Quotation of the Day

We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 4:06:28 AM

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Some guy with wild ambitions, like Richard III or Mac Beth could have said something like this.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 4:43:11 AM

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I think if we are aware of our past, we can understand who we are and this may determine who we shall be.
Lauri Bichi 01
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 7:29:53 AM

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Inspirador..
Lauri Bichi 01
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 7:31:42 AM

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También podría ser: no sabemos lo que somos, por eso no podemos saber lo que podemos llegar a ser.
thar
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 9:22:56 AM

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In context, this is not as profound as on its own.


The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

Act IV scene 5 (start)

Quote:
SCENE V. Elsinore. A room in the castle.

Enter QUEEN GERTRUDE, HORATIO, and a Gentleman
QUEEN GERTRUDE
I will not speak with her.

Gentleman
She is importunate, indeed distract:
Her mood will needs be pitied.

QUEEN GERTRUDE
What would she have?

Gentleman
She speaks much of her father; says she hears
There's tricks i' the world; and hems, and beats her heart;
Spurns enviously at straws; speaks things in doubt,
That carry but half sense: her speech is nothing,
Yet the unshaped use of it doth move
The hearers to collection; they aim at it,
And botch the words up fit to their own thoughts;
Which, as her winks, and nods, and gestures
yield them,
Indeed would make one think there might be thought,
Though nothing sure, yet much unhappily.

HORATIO
'Twere good she were spoken with; for she may strew
Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding minds.

QUEEN GERTRUDE
Let her come in.
Exit HORATIO

To my sick soul, as sin's true nature is,
Each toy seems prologue to some great amiss:
So full of artless jealousy is guilt,
It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.
Re-enter HORATIO, with OPHELIA

OPHELIA
Where is the beauteous majesty of Denmark?

QUEEN GERTRUDE
How now, Ophelia!

OPHELIA
[Sings]
How should I your true love know
From another one?
By his cockle hat and staff,
And his sandal shoon.

QUEEN GERTRUDE
Alas, sweet lady, what imports this song?

OPHELIA
Say you? nay, pray you, mark.
[Sings]
He is dead and gone, lady,
He is dead and gone;
At his head a grass-green turf,
At his heels a stone.

QUEEN GERTRUDE
Nay, but, Ophelia,--

OPHELIA
Pray you, mark.
[Sings]
White his shroud as the mountain snow,--
Enter KING CLAUDIUS

QUEEN GERTRUDE
Alas, look here, my lord.

OPHELIA
[Sings]
Larded with sweet flowers
Which bewept to the grave did go
With true-love showers.

KING CLAUDIUS
How do you, pretty lady?

OPHELIA
Well, God 'ild you! They say the owl was a baker's
daughter. Lord, we know what we are, but know not
what we may be. God be at your table!

KING CLAUDIUS
Conceit upon her father.

OPHELIA
Pray you, let's have no words of this; but when they
ask you what it means, say you this:
[Sings]
To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day,
All in the morning betime,
And I a maid at your window,
To be your Valentine.
Then up he rose, and donn'd his clothes,
And dupp'd the chamber-door;
Let in the maid, that out a maid
Never departed more.

KING CLAUDIUS
Pretty Ophelia!

OPHELIA
Indeed, la, without an oath, I'll make an end on't:
[Sings]
By Gis and by Saint Charity,
Alack, and fie for shame!
Young men will do't, if they come to't;
By cock, they are to blame.
Quoth she, before you tumbled me,
You promised me to wed.
So would I ha' done, by yonder sun,
An thou hadst not come to my bed.

KING CLAUDIUS
How long hath she been thus?


Whistle
mudbudda669
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 12:15:37 PM

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Applause
Antonio Gallo
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 12:29:46 PM

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Daemon wrote:
We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/William+Shakespeare (1564-1616)


I think Will was wrong. We never know what/who we are. If we knew, we wouldn't be born
thar
Posted: Monday, December 31, 2018 3:09:12 PM

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Remember folks, these quotes are mostly not opinions by a philosopher, they are quoted from a character a writer creates.
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 2:05:02 AM

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Quotation of the Day
?
Human life consists in mutual service.
Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935)
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 5:49:12 AM

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Yes; otherwise it is exploitation.
Lauri Bichi 01
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 7:19:08 AM

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Vida humana
Servicio mutuo

Vida común
Perdidos y solos
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 9:31:07 AM

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Quotation of the Day
?
Human life consists in mutual service.
Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935)
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 11:19:33 AM

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monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 5:50:00 PM

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Context from: THE LIVING OF CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN

“Mother gets letter saying Father is worse. Go to see him at sanitarium, Delaware Water Gap. He is much better and seems glad to see me.” I stayed overnight, next day: “Little talk with Father. Give him $5.”—if from me or mother I do not recall. There were many such visits when I was in or near New York. He seemed to value my coming—so long as he knew me. He lingered on, till the beginning of 1900. Softening of the brain. It is not right that a brilliant intellect should be allowed to sink to idiocy, and die slowly, hideously. Some day when we are more civilized we shall not maintain such a horror.

…In January, 1932, I discovered that I had cancer of the breast. My only distress was for Houghton. I had not the least objection to dying. But I did not propose to die of this, so I promptly bought sufficient chloroform as a substitute. Human life consists in mutual service. No grief, pain, misfortune or “broken heart” is excuse for cutting off one’s life while any power of service remains. But when all usefulness is over, when one is assured of unavoidable and imminent death, it is the simplest of human rights to choose a quick and easy death in place of a slow and horrible one.

Public opinion is changing on this subject. The time is approaching when we shall consider it abhorrent to our civilization to allow a human being to die in prolonged agony which we should mercifully end in any other creature. Believing this open choice to be of social service in promoting wiser views on this question, I have preferred chloroform to cancer.

Going to my doctor for definite assurance, he solemnly agreed with my diagnosis and thought the case inoperable.

https://ethicsofsuicide.lib.utah.edu/selections/charlotte-perkins-gilman/
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 5:54:18 PM

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CHARLOTTE PERKINS GILMAN
(1860-1935)

from The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Suicide Note, August 17, 1935
from The Right to Die



Charlotte Perkins Gilman—writer, philosopher, feminist, and social critic—contributed significantly to 20th-century political and feminist theory. Born in 1860 in Hartford, Connecticut, she lived much of her childhood in poverty after her father left the family when she was seven years old. She taught herself to read, studied music, and was largely self-educated in the fields of history, sociology, biology, and evolution. She attended public school sporadically until age 15 and later studied at the Rhode Island School of Design.

Gilman became active in women’s issues at a young age. She founded a women’s gym in Providence when she was 21 at a time when overexertion was thought to cause hysteria in women. She later gained recognition as a lecturer and writer, focusing her talents on the Nationalist Movement, a type of socialism based on Edward Bellamy’s thought and portrayed in his novel Looking Backward (1888). Gilman’s philosophy, activism, and writings showed enormous breadth, and included works on political and social reform, support for the Labor Movement and women’s suffrage, poetry, essays, and studies on gender issues in economics, anthropology, and history. She is also known for her famous work of short fiction The Yellow Wallpaper (1892), a semi-autobiographical account of her nervous breakdown following the birth of her daughter, which, like Virginia Woolf’s [q.v.] Mrs. Dalloway (1925), includes a searing critique of the manner in which the medical community treated women’s mental health near the turn of the century.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1932. Before this diagnosis, Gilman had written about euthanasia and right-to-die issues. In one passage from her posthumously published autobiography The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1935), she remarks after visiting her ill father in a sanitarium that a future civilized society would not “maintain such a horror.” In 1935, after living three years with a cancer she had been told would kill her within a year and a half, Gilman ended her life by inhaling chloroform. She left a letter, conventionally called a suicide note, which stressed her view of the primacy of human relationships and social responsibility (“Human life consists in mutual service”) and ended in the famous line: “I have preferred chloroform to cancer.”

At the time of her death, she left with her agent the manuscript of an article entitled “The Right to Die,” a defense not only of suicide but also of voluntary, non-voluntary, and involuntary euthanasia, requesting that it be published after her death. It was intended as a piece for discussion at the height of the euthanasia movement in the United States, before the horrors of the Nazi holocaust became known.

SOURCE
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: An Autobiography (New York: D. Appleton-Century Co.), 1935, pp. 215, 333-335, 331; “The Right to Die”, The Forum and Century, Vol. XCIV, no. 5 (Nov. 1935), pp. 297-300.

C185445
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 8:36:53 PM

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thar wrote:
Remember folks, these quotes are mostly not opinions by a philosopher, they are quoted from a character a writer creates.


I think sometimes such characters make more sense than the very philosophers the characters are coming from.
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 1:07:11 AM

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Quotation of the Day
?
Caught up in life, you see it badly. You suffer from it or enjoy it too much.
Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880)
Lauri Bichi 01
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 4:57:22 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 9/15/2018
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Location: Rafael Calzada, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Quotation of the Day
?
Caught up in life, you see it badly. You suffer from it or enjoy it too much.
Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880)
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