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The Sublime Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, December 28, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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The Sublime

Derived from a Latin term meaning "uplifted," the word "sublime" is used to describe something of overwhelming greatness, grandeur, or beauty. In aesthetics—the branch of philosophy that deals with the nature and expression of beauty—the concept of the sublime was first developed in On the Sublime, a landmark treatise on literary criticism traditionally attributed to the Greek philosopher Longinus. Why do some philosophers believe that beauty and the sublime are two different things? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, December 28, 2018 12:23:15 AM

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The Sublime
Derived from a Latin term meaning "uplifted," the word "sublime" is used to describe something of overwhelming greatness, grandeur, or beauty. In aesthetics—the branch of philosophy that deals with the nature and expression of beauty—the concept of the sublime was first developed in On the Sublime, a landmark treatise on literary criticism traditionally attributed to the Greek philosopher Longinus.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Friday, December 28, 2018 9:03:50 AM

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Derived from a Latin term meaning "uplifted," the word "sublime" is used to describe something of overwhelming greatness, grandeur, or beauty.
Pieter_Hove
Posted: Friday, December 28, 2018 11:34:17 AM

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I quote: "Shaftesbury had made the journey two years prior to Dennis but did not publish his comments until 1709 in the Moralists. His comments on the experience also reflected pleasure and repulsion, citing a "wasted mountain" that showed itself to the world as a "noble ruin" (Part III, Sec. 1, 390–91), but his concept of the sublime in relation to beauty was one of degree rather than the sharp contradistinction that Dennis developed into a new form of literary criticism. Shaftesbury's writings reflect more of a regard for the awe of the infinity of space ("Space astonishes" referring to the Alps), where the sublime was not an aesthetic quality in opposition to beauty, but a quality of a grander and higher importance than beauty. In referring to the Earth as a "Mansion-Globe" and "Man-Container" Shaftsbury writes "How narrow then must it appear compar'd with the capacious System of its own Sun...tho animated with a sublime Celestial Spirit...." (Part III, sec. 1, 373).[3]"

So 'beauty' became a whole other experience than what we know.
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