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There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 28,271
Neurons: 83,991
Location: Inside Farlex computers
There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 12:31:26 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 2,893
Neurons: 237,702
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Yeah. Especially after long and exhausting working week. Do you know what I mean, my lovely lady?
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 12:53:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 7,010
Neurons: 3,380,263
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Quotation of the Day

There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)
Lauri Bichi 01
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 5:37:45 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 9/15/2018
Posts: 43
Neurons: 57,666
Location: Rafael Calzada, Buenos Aires, Argentina
La comodidad es para soñarla
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 6:53:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/1/2017
Posts: 2,141
Neurons: 391,560
Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Yes, our homes offer real comfort. Purchasable comfort is both superficial and artificial.
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 11:53:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 7,283
Neurons: 5,370,053
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Context from: Emma

Chapter 32

Emma was silenced.

"My brother and sister have promised us a visit in the spring, or summer at farthest," continued Mrs. Elton; "and that will be our time for exploring. While they are with us, we shall explore a great deal, I dare say. They will have their barouche-landau, of course, which holds four perfectly; and therefore, without saying any thing of our carriage, we should be able to explore the different beauties extremely well. They would hardly come in their chaise, I think, at that season of the year. Indeed, when the time draws on, I shall decidedly recommend their bringing the barouche-landau; it will be so very much preferable. When people come into a beautiful country of this sort, you know, Miss Woodhouse, one naturally wishes them to see as much as possible; and Mr. Suckling is extremely fond of exploring. We explored to King's-Weston twice last summer, in that way, most delightfully, just after their first having the barouche-landau. You have many parties of that kind here, I suppose, Miss Woodhouse, every summer?"

"No; not immediately here. We are rather out of distance of the very striking beauties which attract the sort of parties you speak of; and we are a very quiet set of people, I believe; more disposed to stay at home than engage in schemes of pleasure."

"Ah! there is nothing like staying at home, for real comfort. Nobody can be more devoted to home than I am. I was quite a proverb for it at Maple Grove. Many a time has Selina said, when she has been going to Bristol, 'I really cannot get this girl to move from the house. I absolutely must go in by myself, though I hate being stuck up in the barouche-landau without a companion; but Augusta, I believe, with her own good will, would never stir beyond the park paling.' Many a time she has said so; and yet I am no advocate for entire seclusion. I think, on the contrary, when people shut themselves up entirely from society, it is a very bad thing; and that it is much more advisable to mix in the world in a proper degree, without living in it either too much or too little. I perfectly understand your situation, however, Miss Woodhouse (looking towards Mr. Woodhouse) Your father's state of health must be a great drawback. Why does not he try Bath? Indeed he should. Let me recommend Bath to you. I assure you I have no doubt of its doing Mr. Woodhouse good."

"My father tried it more than once, formerly; but without receiving any benefit; and Mr. Perry, whose name, I dare say, is not unknown to you, does not conceive it would be at all more likely to be useful now."

Read more: http://www.pemberley.com/etext/Emma/chapter32.htm

monamagda
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 11:59:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 7,283
Neurons: 5,370,053
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from: Emma

Chapter 32

Emma was silenced.

"My brother and sister have promised us a visit in the spring, or summer at farthest," continued Mrs. Elton; "and that will be our time for exploring. While they are with us, we shall explore a great deal, I dare say. They will have their barouche-landau, of course, which holds four perfectly; and therefore, without saying any thing of our carriage, we should be able to explore the different beauties extremely well. They would hardly come in their chaise, I think, at that season of the year. Indeed, when the time draws on, I shall decidedly recommend their bringing the barouche-landau; it will be so very much preferable. When people come into a beautiful country of this sort, you know, Miss Woodhouse, one naturally wishes them to see as much as possible; and Mr. Suckling is extremely fond of exploring. We explored to King's-Weston twice last summer, in that way, most delightfully, just after their first having the barouche-landau. You have many parties of that kind here, I suppose, Miss Woodhouse, every summer?"

"No; not immediately here. We are rather out of distance of the very striking beauties which attract the sort of parties you speak of; and we are a very quiet set of people, I believe; more disposed to stay at home than engage in schemes of pleasure."

"Ah! there is nothing like staying at home, for real comfort. Nobody can be more devoted to home than I am. I was quite a proverb for it at Maple Grove. Many a time has Selina said, when she has been going to Bristol, 'I really cannot get this girl to move from the house. I absolutely must go in by myself, though I hate being stuck up in the barouche-landau without a companion; but Augusta, I believe, with her own good will, would never stir beyond the park paling.' Many a time she has said so; and yet I am no advocate for entire seclusion. I think, on the contrary, when people shut themselves up entirely from society, it is a very bad thing; and that it is much more advisable to mix in the world in a proper degree, without living in it either too much or too little. I perfectly understand your situation, however, Miss Woodhouse (looking towards Mr. Woodhouse) Your father's state of health must be a great drawback. Why does not he try Bath? Indeed he should. Let me recommend Bath to you. I assure you I have no doubt of its doing Mr. Woodhouse good."

"My father tried it more than once, formerly; but without receiving any benefit; and Mr. Perry, whose name, I dare say, is not unknown to you, does not conceive it would be at all more likely to be useful now."

Read more: http://www.pemberley.com/etext/Emma/chapter32.htm

C185445
Posted: Sunday, December 23, 2018 1:25:35 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 9/22/2017
Posts: 100
Neurons: 275,754
Location: Camarma de Esteruelas, Madrid, Spain
Yeah, but as a lot of the very women from back then knew really well, home can be a comfort as long as you're not trapped inside.
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