mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
When to use bare and naked for body parts? Options
Hemant Patel 1
Posted: Thursday, July 26, 2018 9:10:27 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/26/2016
Posts: 60
Neurons: 2,098
The hot paving stones scorched my naked feet.
The hot paving stones scorched my bare feet.

Also I have seen in dictionaries, naked shoulders, naked chest, naked back. So when to use bare and when to use naked for body parts?

Why naked and bare are together in the sentence below?

Toddlers like to run around the house bare naked.
NKM
Posted: Thursday, July 26, 2018 9:35:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 5,266
Neurons: 315,308
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
I don't think I've ever heard "bare naked" per se; it's pronounced as a compound adjective ("barenaked") with the primary accent on the first syllable.

Other compounds include "barefoot" (or "barefooted") and "bare-handed"; some less obvious ones are "bareback" (riding a horse without a saddle) and "bare-faced" (in the expression "bare-faced liar").

Hemant Patel 1
Posted: Thursday, July 26, 2018 10:18:51 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/26/2016
Posts: 60
Neurons: 2,098
And what about using bare and naked with body parts? How do I know if I have to say bare or naked + body parts (shoulders, feet, chest, back, legs, cheeks)?

The hot paving stones scorched my naked feet.
The hot paving stones scorched my bare feet.
palapaguy
Posted: Thursday, July 26, 2018 11:46:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 1,910
Neurons: 14,578
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Bare naked or bare-naked is idiomatic and used for emphasis in AE. Naked refers to the whole body. Bare usually refers to a body part, such as bare feet or bare hands.
thar
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 3:10:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,774
Neurons: 92,504
In general
A person or a body is naked.
- not wearing any clothes

Your feet, legs, arms, chest, breasts, head, ring finger or any other bodyparts are bare.
- not covered by any item of clothing or shoes, hat, jewellery (depending on the bodypart)

The only exceptions are idiomatic:
- you see something with the naked eye - without a microscope or telescope

- you do something with your bare hands - without complex tools or heavy equipment

- a woman who is used to wearing makeup may say she 'feels naked' without it.

A body may also be nude - unclothed. Nudists choose not to wear clothes.
A picture of a nude body is art, but a picture of a naked body is pornography. Whistle
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 12:05:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,612
Neurons: 86,946
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Excellent explanation , thar. Applause Applause Applause Applause
RuthP
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 1:20:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
thar wrote:
In general
A person or a body is naked.
- not wearing any clothes

Your feet, legs, arms, chest, breasts, head, ring finger or any other bodyparts are bare.
- not covered by any item of clothing or shoes, hat, jewellery (depending on the bodypart)

The only exceptions are idiomatic:
- you see something with the naked eye - without a microscope or telescope

- you do something with your bare hands - without complex tools or heavy equipment

- a woman who is used to wearing makeup may say she 'feels naked' without it.

A body may also be nude - unclothed. Nudists choose not to wear clothes.
A picture of a nude body is art, but a picture of a naked body is pornography. Whistle

This is a very good explanation, thar. I'll add another consideration:

"Nude" is often used in describing art, as thar says. "Nude" is generally a matter of choice for the nude, whether an artist's model or a nudist at home or in public. "Nude" is generally used in a positive sense, without censure or disapproval, although its derivative, "nudity", will be used by those uncomfortable with naked bodies as a polite way of publicizing restrictions: Nudity is not allowed on the beaches. This is a polite way of referring to the naked body without using either "naked" or "bare".

"Bare" tends to simply be descriptive. Clothing is not present on whatever or whomever is under discussion. "Bare" most often describes body parts: bare arms, bare legs, bare head (i.e. no hat), bare midriff. "Bare" is also often used to describe unclothed small children. It is a fairly neutral term.

"Naked" often carries overtones of vulnerability. Such overtones are generally less present when "bare" is used and not a factor with "nude". Sometimes it is an overt sexual vulnerability, but not necessarily. Thus, in the example of bare vs. naked feet on hot pavement, sand, or rocks (as the case may be), either "bare" or "naked" may be appropriate depending upon the circumstances.

If I am describing a day at the beach with my family, where the sand was unexpectedly hot, then I'll have bare feet. The only exception I can think of in this case would be if I actually damaged my feet; if they were burned badly enough to require medical care. Then, I might use naked. Or, not.

On the other hand, if I am writing fiction, and have a character in peril: running from the bad guys, an escape out the window without time to fully dress, or if I am writing a report of refugees fleeing a conflict and making an overland trek through bad country without access to aid, new shoes, adequate water, etc., then the feet may be naked. Using "naked" enhances the feeling of vulnerability and relative helplessness, the lack of resources.

Of course, there are always exceptions. The "naked bike rides" (Google it, if you are not familiar.) are a kind of quasi-aggressive take-back of being unclothed. It is a sort of "My body is fine. Bodies are natural. I have a right to wear it in the open. If you don't like it, look the other way." It is a denial of the idea that nakedness is either vulnerable or wrong. In general, however, the artistic nude, factual bare, and vulnerable naked generally apply to usage.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 27, 2018 2:02:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,416
Neurons: 228,010
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Thanks thar and Ruth!

I 'sort of recognised a difference' but would never have properly differentiated them.

I particularly like the separation you make of 'nude' and 'naked' - of choice and vulnerability. That makes a lot of sense.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.