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take a shine to somebody (something) Options
vil
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 5:19:42 AM
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Joined: 9/8/2010
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Location: Bulgaria
Would you be kind enough to give me your considered opinion concerning the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

The old-fashioned tavern-keeper, before 1850, used to enjoy being boss under his own roof, and bowling out anybody who didn’t take a shine to dirty beds and greasy food. (S. Lewis, “Work of Art”)

take a shine to somebody (something) = take a liking to someone (something), become attached to someone (something), become addicted to someone (something)

V.
IMcRout
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 6:06:54 AM
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I wouldn't go as far as getting attached or addicted to something / somebody.

I've always taken it as having a spontaneous positive reaction to sb./s.th. that CAN but need not be a long-term thing.

But let's wait for the natives, as long as they are not too busy with Irene.

But Farlex and Daemon are still working, so I guess they're okay.

Keep safe, you East Coast people! Pray
intelfam
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 6:44:54 AM
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Joined: 1/18/2010
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Location: United Kingdom
IMcRout wrote:
I wouldn't go as far as getting attached or addicted to something / somebody.

I've always taken it as having a spontaneous positive reaction to sb./s.th. that CAN but need not be a long-term thing.

But let's wait for the natives, as long as they are not too busy with Irene.

But Farlex and Daemon are still working, so I guess they're okay.

Keep safe, you East Coast people! Pray


I am with you Herr Professor. In BE, the phrase has dropped out of use but is occasionally said. As far as I am aware it means, as you say, a spontaneous liking of something/someone that arises during an initial encounter. I cannot recall its use when referring to an occasion when, after knowing someone/something for some time, you suddenly see them in a new light and find them attractive. It has, as you say, a suggestion of a possibly passing "fad" or a superficial knowledge.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 6:51:16 AM

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Take a liking (or take a fancy) to something.
Start to like something.
sandraleesmith46
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 7:53:41 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/20/2009
Posts: 695
Neurons: 2,132
Location: Arizona's high deserts
Okay, I don't have Irene to contend with, and as a native, I would sa you've hit the nail on the head.
MarySM
Posted: Sunday, August 28, 2011 11:44:11 AM
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Joined: 11/22/2009
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I agree that all of you are correct. It is still a common expression "in my neck of the woods."
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