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'moderate drinking&AD' Options
srkdr68
Posted: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 12:46:33 PM
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Joined: 1/13/2011
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Location: India

Moderate Alcohol Drinking May Cut Alzheimer's Risk
Study Suggests That Moderate Drinkers May Have Lower Risk of Developing Memory Problems
By Denise Mann
WebMD Health News

Researchers reviewed 143 studies comprising more than 365,000 participants from 19 countries. Their analysis is published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment.

Moderate drinking is defined as a maximum of one drink daily for women and two drinks daily for men. A standard drink is defined as 1.5 ounces of spirits, 5 ounces of wine, or 12 ounces of beer.

Overall, moderate drinkers were 23% less likely to develop signs of memory problems or Alzheimer's disease. These benefits were seen in 14 of 19 countries, including the U.S., the study showed.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 2:21:38 PM

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Can you add any personal opinion to this thread, srkdr?
nowherenothere
Posted: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 3:18:49 PM
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Joined: 6/15/2011
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One might be better off reading the peer reviewed article and drawing one's own conclusions rather than simply referring to and relying upon the generalizations made in an health news summary from WebMD.

Moderate alcohol consumption and cognitive risk ~ Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment August 2011 Volume 2011:7(1) Pages 465 - 484

I'm a bit skeptical with accepting the premise that drinking one to two alcoholic drinks daily is both healthy and beneficial for ones memory.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

srkdr68 wrote:

Moderate Alcohol Drinking May Cut Alzheimer's Risk
Study Suggests That Moderate Drinkers May Have Lower Risk of Developing Memory Problems
By Denise Mann
WebMD Health News

Researchers reviewed 143 studies comprising more than 365,000 participants from 19 countries. Their analysis is published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment.

Moderate drinking is defined as a maximum of one drink daily for women and two drinks daily for men. A standard drink is defined as 1.5 ounces of spirits, 5 ounces of wine, or 12 ounces of beer.

Overall, moderate drinkers were 23% less likely to develop signs of memory problems or Alzheimer's disease. These benefits were seen in 14 of 19 countries, including the U.S., the study showed.

Maggie
Posted: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 3:58:31 PM
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Joined: 10/27/2009
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nowherenothere wrote:
One might be better off reading the peer reviewed article and drawing one's own conclusions rather than simply referring to and relying upon the generalizations made in an health news summary from WebMD.

Moderate alcohol consumption and cognitive risk ~ Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment August 2011 Volume 2011:7(1) Pages 465 - 484

I'm a bit skeptical with accepting the premise that drinking one to two alcoholic drinks daily is both healthy and beneficial for ones memory.\


May I ask the basis for your skepticism? Are you a non-drinker, perhaps? Do you have other research to refute the claims of the study mentioned above?
intelfam
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2011 7:54:04 AM
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Joined: 1/18/2010
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nowherenothere wrote:
One might be better off reading the peer reviewed article and drawing one's own conclusions rather than simply referring to and relying upon the generalizations made in an health news summary from WebMD.
I'm a bit skeptical with accepting the premise that drinking one to two alcoholic drinks daily is both healthy and beneficial for ones memory.


Thank you for the link to the article nowherenothere. Reading it one can see that the headline statement is far more tentative than it appears. At best there seems a correlation, but the article is a meta-analysis of other work and, although by that means, attempts to exclude many confounding factors in experimental design, it obviously does not address others. Does social ranking make a difference for example? Higher social rank correlates with diet in some countries, as does alcohol consumption of different types.
I find I share your scepticism as it is a post-hoc study and therefore cannot conclude that, for example, by starting to drink, one can defer or prevent the onset of cognitive decline.

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