The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Men come and go as leaves year by year upon the trees. Those of autumn the wind sheds upon the ground, but when spring... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 24,316
Neurons: 72,126
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Men come and go as leaves year by year upon the trees. Those of autumn the wind sheds upon the ground, but when spring returns the forest buds forth with fresh vines.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 2:33:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 3,623
Neurons: 2,435,188
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Quotation of the Day

Men come and go as leaves year by year upon the trees. Those of autumn the wind sheds upon the ground, but when spring returns the forest buds forth with fresh vines.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC)
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 1:24:45 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 2,457
Neurons: 172,602
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
Men come and go as leaves year by year upon the trees. Those of autumn the wind sheds upon the ground, but when spring returns the forest buds forth with fresh vines.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC)


Yeah. In spite of all this, autumn is a beautiful time – and it must be so...
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 8:03:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 6,369
Neurons: 4,241,593
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia

Context from:The Iliad By Homer Book VI


Then Glaukos son of Hippolokhos, and the son of Tydeus went into the open space between the hosts to fight in single combat. When they were close up to one another Diomedes of the loud war-cry was the first to speak. "Who, my good sir," said he, "who are you among men? I have never seen you in battle until now, but you are daring beyond all others if you abide my onset. Woe to those fathers whose sons face my might. If, however, you are one of the immortals and have come down from heaven, I will not fight you; for even valiant Lycurgus, son of Dryas, did not live long when he took to fighting with the gods. He it was that drove the nursing women who were in charge of frenzied Bacchus through the land of Nysa, and they flung their thyrsi on the ground as murderous Lycurgus beat them with his oxgoad. Bacchus himself plunged terror-stricken into the sea, and Thetis took him to her bosom to comfort him, for he was scared by the fury with which the man reviled him. Thereon the gods who live at ease were angry with Lycurgus and the son of Kronos struck him blind, nor did he live much longer after he had become hateful to the immortals. Therefore I will not fight with the blessed gods; but if you are of them that eat the fruit of the ground, draw near and meet your doom."

And the son of Hippolokhos answered, son of Tydeus, why ask me of my lineage? Men come and go as leaves year by year upon the trees. Those of autumn the wind sheds upon the ground, but when the season [hôra] of spring returns the forest buds forth with fresh vines.

Even so is it with the generations of humankind, the new spring up as the old are passing away. If, then, you would learn my descent, it is one that is well known to many. There is a city in the heart of Argos, pasture land of horses, called Ephyra, where Sisyphus lived, who was the craftiest of all humankind. He was the son of Aeolus, and had a son named Glaukos, who was father to Bellerophon, whom heaven endowed with the most surpassing comeliness and beauty. But Proetus devised his ruin, and being stronger than he, drove him from the district [dêmos] of the Argives, over which Zeus had made him ruler. For Antaea, wife of Proetus, lusted after him, and would have had him lie with her in secret; but Bellerophon was an honorable man and would not, so she told lies about him to Proetus. ‘Proetus,’ said she, ‘kill Bellerophon or die, for he would have had converse with me against my will.’ The king was angered, but shrank from killing Bellerophon, so he sent him to Lycia bearing baneful signs [sêmata], written inside a folded tablet and containing much ill against the bearer. He bade Bellerophon show these written signs to his father-in-law, to the end that he might thus perish; Bellerophon therefore went to Lycia, and the gods convoyed him safely.

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0217%3Abook%3D6%3Acard%3D102

Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.