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He has a reach beyond which his antecedents would have only dreamed Options
maltliquor87
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 2:41:54 AM

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Joined: 11/29/2017
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Location: Moscow, Moscow, Russia
Hello!

The sentence in question matches the title of this topic. I'm not at all sure that the sentence is gramatically correct. I would rewrite it as follows:

Quote:
He has a reach beyond that of which his antecedents would have only dreamed


Could you, please, tell me whether both sentences are good or only one of them makes sense in terms of grammar.


AndEng
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 8:50:50 AM

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Hello maltliquor87,

the way you rephrased the sentence is awkward and (I would say) is not correct. Besides, the two versions do not have the same meaning.

I believe the problem lies in the meaning of the word "reach" and the way you read the "beyond which", you do not have to separate them.

The sentence

"He has a reach beyond which his antecedents would have only dreamed"

can be rephrased, by making the meaning of reach more explicit

- He has a comprehension (of something ... the situation, the problem, ) beyond which his antecedents would have only dreamed

or

- He has a range of influence beyond which his antecedents would have only dreamed


In other words, his comprehension of the situation or his influence, his power is so wide that his predecessors could have never imagined to have.

I hope that helps a bit.



maltliquor87
Posted: Friday, April 20, 2018 11:01:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/29/2017
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Neurons: 96,739
Location: Moscow, Moscow, Russia
Thanks.
I initially thought that the verb "dream" required the preposition "of" in this context.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, April 21, 2018 7:17:25 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I'm sorry to be a little late answering this. I didn't read it before.

I am used to seeing sentences in this style without the "beyond" - it is not really needed for the idiom.

Whatever 'reach' means (I understood it as "sphere of influence" or something similar), I would say it like this:

He has a reach which his antecedents would have only dreamed of.
He has a reach his antecedents only dreamed of.

If reach were measured in metres.
- His antecedents had a reach of eight metres. They dreamed of ten.
- He has a reach of ten metres.
maltliquor87
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 11:29:48 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/29/2017
Posts: 269
Neurons: 96,739
Location: Moscow, Moscow, Russia
Thank you Dragonspeaker. Yes, in the sentence "reach" means "clout", "influence".

Would anyone care to comment on whether the following sentence is correct?

Quote:
He has a reach beyond what his antecedents would have dreamed of
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2018 2:01:38 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
Neurons: 228,163
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It is grammatically correct. The 'that of' which you suggested is not needed.

In the original sentence, "beyond" acts as the preposition of "which". "Of" is not needed, and does not work.

In yours, "beyond" is related to "that", so "of" is needed to refer to "which"


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