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's (verb to be) Options
pscris
Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2011 6:28:03 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/14/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: Brazil
Hi,
I have a doubt here!

It's about the 's.

When it means the contraction form of the verb to be. How can I write the sentence below?

Carlos's a student.
or
Carlos' a student

or both are wrong?



thar
Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2011 6:42:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 22,203
Neurons: 90,043
You would not normally use the contraction after an ess sound, unless you are writing speech where you are really showing the person is dropping the 'is'.
you are contracting is to 's. If you have the ess sound, then there is really no contraction.

so
Carlos is a student
no real contraction
Carlos's would be pronounced 'Carloses' so it is not a contraction.

without the ess sound, you would use a contraction, eg Carlo instead of Carlos
Carlo is a student
Carlo's a student

do not think of the ' contraction as like the possessive
the car's doors (of the car)
the cars' doors (of the cars)

the contraction is not a grammatical rule, it a result of speech.
if you say 'Carlo is' and run it together, two weak vowels become one - Carlo's. But 'Carlos is' does not change as it runs together.

forget the 's, s'. it is missing letters that become the '
can't, don't I'd, he'll, he's, Carlo's,
Carlos will = Carlos'll
Carlos had = Carlos'd
Carlos would = Carlos'ld
but
Carlos is = Carlos's - if you really want to put it in! But you would not normally bother.

oh, and hi and welcome!
MrH
Posted: Sunday, August 14, 2011 8:16:35 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/25/2011
Posts: 30
Neurons: 90
Location: United States
Thar
Quote:

the contraction is not a grammatical rule, it a result of speech.


I think that's --that is-- the crux of most peoples confusion.

The examples posted were refreshing to read, kudos.

To add: Some contractions just sound awkward to hear. Perhaps there are some

in other languages that, although grammatically correct, just aren't used either.?
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