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Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 10:38:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Hi
How should I write the below in passive voice?
They have been married since 2012.
sureshot
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 12:20:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,024
Neurons: 379,421
Tara2 wrote:
Hi
How should I write the below in passive voice?
They have been married since 2012.

_________________________

The sentence is not written in passive voice as the verb group is not transitive in function.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 1:12:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,187
Neurons: 73,859
It is the verb 'to be' + an adjective.

They are tall. They are Canadian. They are married.
They have been married for ten years.


If it were the verb 'to marry' used transitively, you could make it passive.
A priest married them.
They were married by a priest.
But that usage is extremely rare.

If you look at your sentence
They have been married since 2012.


Is that something that was done to them? No
Is is something they have done, continuously since 2012? No.
So it is not a verb 'to marry'.
So this is an adjective about their status.
It is the verb 'to be'.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 5:41:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 42,140
Neurons: 428,940
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
The couples being married 2012 are old couples today ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 5:48:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
thar wrote:
It is the verb 'to be' + an adjective.

They are tall. They are Canadian. They are married.
They have been married for ten years.


If it were the verb 'to marry' used transitively, you could make it passive.
A priest married them.
They were married by a priest.
But that usage is extremely rare.

If you look at your sentence
They have been married since 2012.


Is that something that was done to them? No
Is is something they have done, continuously since 2012? No.
So it is not a verb 'to marry'.
So this is an adjective about their status.
It is the verb 'to be'.

Thank you so much.
What about this,please?
They have been getting married since 2012.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 5:51:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
The couples being married 2012 are old couples today ;-)

Thanks a lot.
What is the difference between "The couples being married 2012" and "They have been married since 2012"? please?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 6:01:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 42,140
Neurons: 428,940
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Tara2 wrote:

What is the difference between "The couples being married 2012" and "They have been married since 2012"? please?


First married is a verb (someone married them back then), the second is a noun (they have been a couple since then).


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 7:10:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Tara2 wrote:

What is the difference between "The couples being married 2012" and "They have been married since 2012"? please?


First married is a verb (someone married them back then), the second is a noun (they have been a couple since then).

Thank you so much.
Is "The couples being married 2012" passive voice for saying "They have been married since 2012"?
Is "The couples being married since 2012" correct too?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 8:22:48 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 42,140
Neurons: 428,940
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
"The couples being married since 2012" is correct, but it concerns ALL the couples being married from the year 2012 till now.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 8:27:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
"The couples being married since 2012" is correct, but it concerns ALL the couples being married from the year 2012 till now.

Thank you very much
If I say: "My parrents being married since 2012", what does that mean, please?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 8:50:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 42,140
Neurons: 428,940
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
They married back then and are still married.

EDIT:
On the second thought, that would be a bit odd. They probably haven't been married every year since 2012.
But they have been married since 2012. Married here is a noun.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 9:52:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
They married back then and are still married.

EDIT:
On the second thought, that would be a bit odd. They probably haven't been married every year since 2012.
But they have been married since 2012. Married here is a noun.

Is "they being married since 2012" passive?
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 10:08:33 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
thar wrote:
It is the verb 'to be' + an adjective.

They are tall. They are Canadian. They are married.
They have been married for ten years.


If it were the verb 'to marry' used transitively, you could make it passive.
A priest married them.
They were married by a priest.
But that usage is extremely rare.

If you look at your sentence
They have been married since 2012.


Is that something that was done to them? No
Is is something they have done, continuously since 2012? No.
So it is not a verb 'to marry'.
So this is an adjective about their status.
It is the verb 'to be'.

What about these, please?
1- They have been getting married since 2012.
2- They have been being married since 2012.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 12:43:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,886
Neurons: 51,912
Tara2 wrote:
thar wrote:
It is the verb 'to be' + an adjective.

They are tall. They are Canadian. They are married.
They have been married for ten years.


If it were the verb 'to marry' used transitively, you could make it passive.
A priest married them.
They were married by a priest.
But that usage is extremely rare.

If you look at your sentence
They have been married since 2012.


Is that something that was done to them? No
Is is something they have done, continuously since 2012? No.
So it is not a verb 'to marry'.
So this is an adjective about their status.
It is the verb 'to be'.

What about these, please?
1- They have been getting married since 2012.
No, this one says they have been repeating the marriage ceremony since 2012.
2- They have been being married since 2012.
If you omit "being" the sentence is fine, but "being" says the same thing as "have been". Both mean they exist in a state of marriage, so "being" is redundant.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 1:05:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
thar wrote:
It is the verb 'to be' + an adjective.

They are tall. They are Canadian. They are married.
They have been married for ten years.


If it were the verb 'to marry' used transitively, you could make it passive.
A priest married them.
They were married by a priest.
But that usage is extremely rare.

If you look at your sentence
They have been married since 2012.


Is that something that was done to them? No
Is is something they have done, continuously since 2012? No.
So it is not a verb 'to marry'.
So this is an adjective about their status.
It is the verb 'to be'.

What about these, please?
1- They have been getting married since 2012.
No, this one says they have been repeating the marriage ceremony since 2012.
2- They have been being married since 2012.
If you omit "being" the sentence is fine, but "being" says the same thing as "have been". Both mean they exist in a state of marriage, so "being" is redundant.


Why it means "they have been repeating the marriage ceremony since 2012"?
Is this passive or active?
1- "The couples being married 2012" 2- "The couples being married since 2012"
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 1:32:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,886
Neurons: 51,912
Tara2 wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
thar wrote:
It is the verb 'to be' + an adjective.

They are tall. They are Canadian. They are married.
They have been married for ten years.


If it were the verb 'to marry' used transitively, you could make it passive.
A priest married them.
They were married by a priest.
But that usage is extremely rare.

If you look at your sentence
They have been married since 2012.


Is that something that was done to them? No
Is is something they have done, continuously since 2012? No.
So it is not a verb 'to marry'.
So this is an adjective about their status.
It is the verb 'to be'.

What about these, please?
1- They have been getting married since 2012.
No, this one says they have been repeating the marriage ceremony since 2012.
2- They have been being married since 2012.
If you omit "being" the sentence is fine, but "being" says the same thing as "have been". Both mean they exist in a state of marriage, so "being" is redundant.


Why it means "they have been repeating the marriage ceremony since 2012"?
Is this passive or active?
This is the difference between "getting" married" and "have been" married. The first is something that is actively done, and the second is the condition they are in after that -- they are married.

To say "they are getting married" means they are actively doing something since a point in time -- 2012. They have been [doing this - getting married] since 2012. It is like saying "I have been breathing since I was born". It is something you have done constantly.

1- "The couples being married 2012" 2- "The couples being married since 2012"
These are not complete sentences because "being" here is describing a state of existence. You would say, "The couples were married in 2012", which means they entered marriage in 2012, or, "The couples have been married since 2012", which means they are still in that condition since 2012.





We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Tara2
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 1:58:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
thar wrote:
It is the verb 'to be' + an adjective.

They are tall. They are Canadian. They are married.
They have been married for ten years.


If it were the verb 'to marry' used transitively, you could make it passive.
A priest married them.
They were married by a priest.
But that usage is extremely rare.

If you look at your sentence
They have been married since 2012.


Is that something that was done to them? No
Is is something they have done, continuously since 2012? No.
So it is not a verb 'to marry'.
So this is an adjective about their status.
It is the verb 'to be'.

What about these, please?
1- They have been getting married since 2012.
No, this one says they have been repeating the marriage ceremony since 2012.
2- They have been being married since 2012.
If you omit "being" the sentence is fine, but "being" says the same thing as "have been". Both mean they exist in a state of marriage, so "being" is redundant.


Why it means "they have been repeating the marriage ceremony since 2012"?
Is this passive or active?
This is the difference between "getting" married" and "have been" married. The first is something that is actively done, and the second is the condition they are in after that -- they are married.

To say "they are getting married" means they are actively doing something since a point in time -- 2012. They have been [doing this - getting married] since 2012. It is like saying "I have been breathing since I was born". It is something you have done constantly.

1- "The couples being married 2012" 2- "The couples being married since 2012"
These are not complete sentences because "being" here is describing a state of existence. You would say, "The couples were married in 2012", which means they entered marriage in 2012, or, "The couples have been married since 2012", which means they are still in that condition since 2012.






Thank you so much :)
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