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pleated skirt Options
Helenej
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 4:50:53 AM

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These two skirts are both called ‘pleated’. But they are different. The first skirt has folds under the waistband while the other doesn’t. How can I call each skirt in the phrase “I would like to buy…” so that the sales clerk won’t be confused?
pleated skirt 1
pleated skirt 2
thar
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 5:23:56 AM

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The first one is pleated - the material is folded over itself.


The second has soft pleats - the material is just pressed that way.



Not that I know anything about these things! d'oh!
David Kitajima Miller
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 6:37:13 AM

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Applause Applause
mactoria
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 6:57:46 AM
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Helene: Both skirts are permanently pleated, and I have to disagree with Thar that #2's pleats are just ironed in. Skirt #1 has large wide pleats that are held in place by the waistband (as you pointed out), while the other Skirt #2 has multiple small pleats that are probably (can't see in the photo) held by a much smaller waistband or maybe pinned underneath and folded over the band at the top. No doubt the pleats in both were probably 'pressed' during the manufacturing process, but pressing wouldn't be sufficient all on its own to permanently hold the pleats. As well, the type of fabric used in each skirt (one looks to be a heavy, stiff fabric while the other looks to be a shearer, loose fabric (#1 might be a wool, while #2 might be a jersey or light cotton).

I can't think of the names of either of this types of skirts, hopefully someone else will (in looking on Google, all I could find was #1 is like the old private-school skirts while #2 is more like an accordion or knife-pleated skirt which is more contemporary). Short of different names, what you'd describe to a sales clerk is the type of skirt you want: wide stiff pleats held by a large waistband in a heavy fabric, or small soft pleats in a light fabric that allows the skirt to be loose and swingy; a good sales clerk would get the idea even if you don't have an exact style name.
Helenej
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:06:07 AM

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mactoria wrote:
Skirt #2 has multiple small pleats that are probably (can't see in the photo) held by a much smaller waistband or maybe pinned underneath and folded over the band at the top.

No, in skirt 2 the cloth isn't folded at all under the waistband. And the pleats on skirt 2 are permanent. You can wash the skirt tons of times and it doesn't need ironing.
philips daughter
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:46:11 AM

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It appears that skirt number 2 is made with pleated material, material that is pleated in manufacturing. The first skirt was made of regular material that was pleated as it was sewn.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:53:37 AM

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You could look up the topic of pleats -- much information is available to describe the types of pleats and how to produce them.

one example:

isntthatsew.org /pleats/

remove the space, of course...
philips daughter
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 10:11:31 AM

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One more type of skirt is gathered rather than pleated. Pleats are made using a pleat gauge. Gathered skirts have a running stitch that can be pulled to gather the material then attached to a waist band or a dress bodice. A waist band isn’t necessary for this type skirt.
hedy mmm
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 11:34:59 AM

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The first one are 'Knife' pleats, which can be any depth, direction going left or right to one side or box pleated, and caught at the waist with a band. The method is using fabric that is rectangular (selvedge to selvedge). Much bulkier than style #2 because of the folds at the waist.

The second is 'Accordion' pleated, which can also be any depth at the hemline, however, the fabric is usually a circle (or 1/2, or 1/4, ect), with the inner circle cutout determines the waist size. Thus, the skirt has more movement and usually the waist may not have any folded fabric. 'Crystal' pleats are much smaller, used primarily for evening wear... chiffons, organzas.

philips daughter wrote:
"Pleats are made using a pleat gauge." — correctomundo, (and it's a trip without one!)
Yes, accordion/crystal pleating is manufactured, however, some fabric stores sell the fabric pleated for the designer for tops, skirts, sleeves, etc.



"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Helenej
Posted: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 2:04:55 PM

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Thanks a lot for your help, guys. Much impressed by Hedy’s professional explanation.
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 7:46:38 AM

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Helenej wrote:
Thanks a lot for your help, guys. Much impressed by Hedy’s professional explanation.


I wonder whether women would care to be called "guys" these days... Somehow I 've always been under impression (maybe wrongly) that "a guy" is a male d'oh!

guy(n.2) etimology:

"fellow," 1847, American English; earlier, in British English (1836) "grotesquely or poorly dressed person," originally (1806) "effigy of Guy Fawkes," leader of the Gunpowder Plot to blow up British king and Parliament (Nov. 5, 1605). The effigies were paraded through the streets by children on the anniversary of the conspiracy. The male proper name is from French, related to Italian Guido.
https://www.etymonline.com/word/guy
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 8:18:30 AM

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In informal English, both AE and BE, guys (notice the plural) can refer to persons of either sex.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
hedy mmm
Posted: Thursday, March 15, 2018 12:35:32 PM

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Helenej wrote:
Thanks a lot for your help, guys. Much impressed by Hedy’s professional explanation.

Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
I wonder whether women would care to be called "guys" these days... Somehow I 've always been under impression (maybe wrongly) that "a guy" is a male d'oh!

Thank you Helenej for your accolade.
and
Kirill Vorobyov, I am one 'girl', who sees nothing wrong with being referred to as a 'guy'...in fact the terms 'policeman', 'fireman', 'congressman', 'chairman', and even 'master of ceremony' have been so grossly discombobulated...that it makes my skin crawl...d'oh!

I am one 'guy' that's always dressed impeccably feminine...especially in my crystal pleated evening dress! Dancing
hedy

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Romany
Posted: Friday, March 16, 2018 5:43:21 AM
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Just before the thread finishes, Hellene - you mentioned pleats that aren't mainly produced by ironing - the material is folded but the pleats have to be ironed back into the garment each time it's washed? Those are called box pleats. (Just to add to your pleat info!)

Kirill - as JJ says, guys can refer to both men and women. It may have started off in the USA as masculine, but by the time it crossed the waves to other countries it was non-gendered.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, March 16, 2018 7:35:14 PM

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And another last-minute comment.

Following on from Hedy's information:

I've always heard of the second style as "circle-skirt". They are very popular for country dance (and also Flamenco) - I think some are even more than a full circle so when the dancer spins, the skirt forms waves.

The first one (though there may be proper names for it) would easily be described as 'a grey (flannel)/(woolen) school skirt'. It's exactly the style of many school uniforms - though some are tartan rather than grey.
You could even call it a girl's kilt (though "officially" a kilt is only pleated for two-thirds of waist - the front is smooth and overlapped).

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Helenej
Posted: Saturday, March 17, 2018 3:51:12 PM

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Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
Thank you everyone for your help.
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