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Did You Know? Series #2 Options
hedy mmm
Posted: Saturday, March 10, 2018 7:26:10 PM

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Joined: 7/29/2014
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Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Dear Learners:

These two beverages are very interesting reads. I'm not partial to Gin, but coffee is my favorite beverage! Enjoy reading. Dancing

Did You Know About Mood Altering Herbs?

Gin is one of the alcoholic beverages that is a favorite for altering moods. The word is an English abbreviation of genever, the Dutch word for juniper, for the predominant flavor of this popular alcoholic drink is derived from juniper berries (Junipers communis). In Holland in the 1580s, British troops fighting in the Dutch War of Independence found a juniper-flavored spirit. They drank as much as they could to give themselves what they appreciatively called “Dutch courage”. Soon, gin was being consumed everywhere, at any time. For textile mill workers in northern France, for instance, a slug of gin in coffee (a “bistouille”) was a popular breakfast drink.
In addition to the predominant juniper, gin may be flavored with citrus (lemon, lime, grapefruit, and bitter orange peel), as well as anise, angelica root and seed, orris root, licorice root, cinnamon, cubeb, savory, dragon eye, saffron, baobab, frankincense, coriander, nutmeg, and cassia bark.

Coffee (Coffea spp.) is probably the most popular mood-altering plant in human experience. In the US, we’ve enjoyed a beverage brewed from this plant for only about three hundred years, but people in the Middle East began drinking it centuries before that. Legend has it that a Yemeni shepherd watched his goats nibble reddish-brown berries from a bush and then leap and dance, having a high old time—a caffeine rush, no doubt. The shepherd told his story to a monk, who (having fought off drowsiness during many all-night prayer sessions) knew a good thing when he heard it. He boiled the berries in water, and before you could say Starbucks, he was pouring cups of dark, rich mocha for himself and his fellow monks, who were also aware of the virtue of staying awake.

Whatever the truth of the legend, this herbal beverage spread quickly from Africa through Arabia and Egypt, gathering converts wherever it was brewed. It was considered medicinal and used as a stimulant, diuretic, and a treatment for headaches, muscle aches, asthma, fever, colds, flu, constipation, menstrual cramps, congestive heart failure, and general what-have-you. Too much coffee can lead to nervousness, irritability, and the jitters. But most Americans couldn’t get through the day without it.

Source - "Mourning Gloria" by Susan Wittig Albert

"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
coag
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 1:20:09 AM

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Joined: 3/27/2010
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Several years ago I wondered why "mocha" is associated with coffee. It was interesting to learn that Mocha is the name of a port, in the Middle East, through which coffee was exported, in the past.
taurine
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 5:17:54 AM

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Location: South Dublin, Ireland
Not so long ago I discovered protein drink with coffee.
It is amazing how coffee can make protein drink attractive.

J'ai perdu mes amis en Afrique durant la dernière semaine de 2017
TMe
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 9:54:21 AM

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Good thread, hedy mmm;

Coffee is an incredibly healthy beverage packed with hundreds of biologically active compounds, including caffeine, chlorogenic acid, trigonelline, cafestol and kahweol. Caffeine causes changes in several neurotransmitters that may improve mood, reaction time, learning and vigilance. Consuming moderate amounts of coffee may protect against Parkinson's disease. This effect is attributed to the caffeine.

I am a layman.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 5:40:36 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
There is a strong argument to say tea not coffee is the worlds most popular mood altering plant, it contains caffeine like coffee and aslo has many medicinal uses.

It is far more popular than coffee in many countries including China and India and those two countries have such a large proportion of the worlds population in them it squews the statistics in teas favour. This means some researchers say for every cup of coffee consumed 3 cups of tea are drank.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
coag
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 7:26:33 PM

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What you are saying, Sarrriesfan, may be true.

I would say that coffee is the most popular beverage in the Americas and Europe. This is just my impression, I don't know any official numbers. The impression is from observing what people from different countries, that I have met, prefer to drink.

In Toronto we have a couple of chains of coffee shops but I don't know if there is any tea shop. When I say a tea shop, I mean something like Starbucks or Second Cup where they sell primarily tea.

Several years ago I watched a TV program about coffee and I heard two things which were interesting to me.
1. Coffee is the second (after crude oil) most valuable commodity exported by developing countries.
2. The price of a small coffee in Canada, at that time, was a little over $1 (nowadays, I think, it could be around $1.5). Only 1 cent of that price goes to coffee growers. I don't know if this is true, but that's what they said in the TV program. If true, this is shocking to me, this is very unfair to people who sweat in coffee fields.
coag
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 7:41:22 PM

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I don't remember I've ever tried gin.

I searched the Internet to see how you make gin, what's the difference between gin and brandy or whiskey. I don't know much about spirits but from what I red, you make gin in the same way you make brandy or whiskey. What distinguishes gin is that it's flavored with juniper. I've seen a recipe where you make gin by flavoring vodka.

I had a laugh reading the Wikipedia article about gin.
"Gin was developed based on the older Dutch liquor, jenever, and became popular in Great Britain (particularly in London) when William of Orange, leader of the Dutch Republic, occupied the English, Scottish, and Irish thrones with his wife Mary between 1689 and 1702."

A Dutch king occupied British thrones with his wife Mary. I interpreted this in a funny way. But that's probably because I am a bad ESL speaker.

This is how people, where I grew up (former Yugoslavia), make plum brandy at home.

hedy mmm
Posted: Sunday, March 11, 2018 10:53:22 PM

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Joined: 7/29/2014
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Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Thanks for your posts taurine, TMe and coag (I love your photo of a plum brandy maker!...mmmm good!)
I learned quite a bit also with all your comments...

I'd like to share some favorite coffee quotes: "Decaf only works if you throw it at people", "A day without coffee is like....Just kidding. I have no idea", I don't know what I would do without coffee, I'm guessing 25 to life".

But most Americans couldn’t get through the day without Coffee...no argument there..."a cup of joe", "a cup of java",
and I can still by a cup for $1.25 which they'll refill 2 - 3 times, in my favorite Diner! Dancing

So, "If asked, How do I take my coffee?", I reply "Seriously, very seriously." Whistle


"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, March 12, 2018 4:27:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,140
Neurons: 7,320
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
coag wrote:
What you are saying, Sarrriesfan, may be true.

I would say that coffee is the most popular beverage in the Americas and Europe. This is just my impression, I don't know any official numbers. The impression is from observing what people from different countries, that I have met, prefer to drink.

In Toronto we have a couple of chains of coffee shops but I don't know if there is any tea shop. When I say a tea shop, I mean something like Starbucks or Second Cup where they sell primarily tea.

Several years ago I watched a TV program about coffee and I heard two things which were interesting to me.
1. Coffee is the second (after crude oil) most valuable commodity exported by developing countries.
2. The price of a small coffee in Canada, at that time, was a little over $1 (nowadays, I think, it could be around $1.5). Only 1 cent of that price goes to coffee growers. I don't know if this is true, but that's what they said in the TV program. If true, this is shocking to me, this is very unfair to people who sweat in coffee fields.


It's true that coffee is more popular in the Americas and much of Europe, although not in the UK Ireland and Russia which is partially in Europe. It's not a criticism of Hedy mmm herself , she is only quoting a source it's a mistake that the original author made, they have presumed that just because coffee is most popular in the west the same is true everywhere.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 7:40:55 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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coag wrote:


I had a laugh reading the Wikipedia article about gin.
"Gin was developed based on the older Dutch liquor, jenever, and became popular in Great Britain (particularly in London) when William of Orange, leader of the Dutch Republic, occupied the English, Scottish, and Irish thrones with his wife Mary between 1689 and 1702."

A Dutch king occupied British thrones with his wife Mary. I interpreted this in a funny way. But that's probably because I am a bad ESL speaker.





Not sure what exactly you found funny - it is a weird way of saying it, even wiypthout toiiket jokes - but it actually describes a funny situation - one that had never occurred before and will probably never happen again - co-monarchs. He genuinely did occupy the thrones with his wife.

After the English royal line died out (syphilis leads to infertility Whistle ) the English throne went to the nearest heir who was the Scottish king. But the Stuarts were lousy kings, too much in the French style of believing themselves absolute rulers. Parliament objected, there was a war Parliament won and the King was executed. But the experiment led, as so many revolutions do, to something the people hated even more. Taliban-style religious extremism, no fun. [I think that is why the monarchy has stayed so relatively secure in England, if not Britain - it is not that people love monarchy, its that they had the alternative and didn't fancy it). Whistle
So they invited back the Stuart king, then his brother, but the same problem was arising with the king being too big for his boots. Too Scottish. Too French-influenced. Too Catholic. Too 'Divine Right of Kings'.
What to do? There was a Dutch prince with a claim to the throne - having been trained in a constitutional monarchy he would know his role as king was to do what Parliament told him to. And he was married to the king's daughter. Neither had a strong claim separately, one foreign and one a female from the despised Stuarts - but together they would be strong enough to be a stable monarchy - and all people wanted was stability. So in the 'Glorious Revolution' William and Mary together took the throne and the Stuart king James II (her father) ran away to France.
They were both monarchs. When she died, he ruled alone. But when he died, her sister took the throne.
In the list of monarchs, you have:
James I
Charles I (executed)
Interregnum - Commonwealth
Charles II
James II (sailed away in the night)
William and Mary
William III (same man as before but now a sole monarchy)
Anne

So, that is pretty odd, and quite hard to express simply!
And the thrones were still separate. For example James was James I of England but James VI of Scotland.
When the current Queen took the throne, she became Elizabeth II. But Scottish nationalists had a stunt defacing post boxes with ER II on them, because they claimed as Elizabeth I had been Queen of England, not Scotland, the current Queen was actually ER I in Scotland!Whistle

England went mad for all things Orange with the arrival of William - gin, tulips, strict ornamental gardens and a king who didn't speak English so couldn't tell anyone what to do. Ah, bliss! Whistle

It was so successful they tried it again with a German when the throne next becane vacant. A very successful arrangement. Whistle

coag
Posted: Saturday, March 17, 2018 5:54:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2010
Posts: 1,112
Neurons: 5,908
Thanks for your historical notes, thar. I had not known anything about the royal couple.

The Wikipedia sentence was strange to me. It were kings with their armies that conquered and occupied at that time, I wondered why the sentence mentioned the Dutch prince's wife. Especially, why her name was specified, what did that matter. But, your comments clarified everything.

The sentence was funny to me because I erroneously made extrapolations from Croatian to English. The Wikipedia sentence, if literally translated to Croatian, would be locker room humor, to some people. I wouldn't like to sound vulgar, but some people could interpret that the Dutch royal involved (perhaps from opportunistic reasons) his wife in sexual affairs at British thrones.

I wonder if it would be acceptable to say in English something like:
He occupied me with his requests,
meaning, he gave me his requests and I was busy with acting on his requests.
If yes, then it seems to me that a locker room interpretation of the Wikipedia sentence cold be possible in English, too.

By the way, since "Orange" was mentioned, I had wondered for a long time why the Netherlands' football team wears orange jerseys. The Netherlands' flag is red, white and blue and I would expect one of these colors on their jerseys. It's only recently that I read somewhere that orange is the Dutch royal color.
thar
Posted: Saturday, March 17, 2018 6:34:17 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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If you occupy somebipdy that suggests you annoy them and waste their time. Nothing particularly lascivious.
In English is is vaguely amusing because 'the throne' is a toilet. Whistle

Yep - Holland, Netherlands, Dutch, Orange but not just Orange. It really does seem to have identity issues. Whistle

You know orange carrots are in tribute to the House Of Orange? If I remember correvtly, and whatI read is true, in their native Afghanistan they were mostly black, but then the Dutch traders arrive - and you know how the Dutch like growing plants - well, they managed to make orange ones! Just for the joke. Total suck-ups! Whistle
coag
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2018 12:08:56 AM

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Joined: 3/27/2010
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Thanks, thar, once again. I had not known the story about orange carrots and the Dutch. The story is entertaining.
The only carrots I had ever known were orange carrots.


Carrots in a range of colours, Wikipedia

It would be interesting to develop green, and blue carrots.
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2018 8:30:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,187
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Heritage carrots.
Purdy! [Pretty]




Quote:
The Black Carrot

- Black carrots are also an excellent source of anthocyanins. Anthocyanins help lower bad cholesterol (LDL) along with helping protect the arteries against oxidation.

Wild carrot has a small, tough pale fleshed bitter white root; modern domestic carrot has a swollen, juice sweet root, usually orange. Carrots originated in present day Afghanistan about 5000 years ago, probably originally as a purple or yellow root. Nature then took a hand and produced mutants and natural hybrids, crossing both with cultivated and wild varieties. It is considered that purple carrots were then taken westwards where it is thought yellow mutants and wild forms crossed to produce orange. Finally some motivated Dutch growers took these mutant orange carrots under their horticultural wings and developed them to be sweeter and more practical. Black carrots are more weather sensitive and it is suspected that they did not "travel" well to the colder parts of western Europe. Even today growing black carrots in the West can be problematic and they often bolt in the first year, producing spindly roots and no flowers, or at the best very weak ones.

In the Roman period carrots were purple or white. By the 10th century purple carrots were grown in Afghanistan, Pakistan and northern Iran. Purple, white and yellow carrots were imported to southern Europe in the 14th century. Black, red and white carrots were also grown. Black Carrots contain anthocyanins, part of the flavonoid family with antioxidant properties. Flavanoids are currently under investigation as anticancer compounds, as free radical scavengers in living systems, as well as inhibitors of LDL (the bad) cholesterol and the black carrot anthocyanins are especially active.

Purple carrots


Purple carrots are even higher in antioxidants than orange carrots, and they also possess anti-inflammatory properties. This could make them very useful in the treatment of arthritis. They have been found to be antiviral, antiseptic and antimicrobial, and they also contain anticarcinogens and betacarotenes. They also contain phytochemicals including carotenoids, polyacetylenes, isocoumarins, phenolics and sesquiterpenes. Phytochemicals have antioxidant, anti-bacterial, and other disease preventative and health enhancing properties.

Anticarcinogens help to reduce the risk of cancer and also help to fight against any already-present cancer cells in our bodies. Purple carrots are also excellent at fighting against viral as well as bacterial infections, such as flu, measles and internal infections of the urinary tract, mouth and stomach.

Purple carrots contain high doses of Vitamin A, which helps to prevent clogging of the arteries and thus helps to prevent strokes. Along with that, they also contain vitamin B, C and E as well as calcium pectate, which is a very good source of fibre, and they help to lower cholesterol levels. They are also very useful in the prevention of macular degeneration.

Studies into the health qualities of purple carrots have shown that they give us extra protection against various forms of cancer and heart disease. They contain purple pigments called anthocyanins, and act as anti-oxidants that protect the body.

There are up to 28 times more anthocyanins - the antioxidant that creates the purple-red pigment in blueberries and raspberries - in purple carrots than there are in orange ones.


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