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It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations. Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
jcbarros
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 12:57:50 AM

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Great men? What´s that?
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 1:15:16 AM
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Daemon wrote:
It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations. Charles Dickens (1812-1870)



The above quote comes from the story entitled, Bleak House written in 1853. The analogy of plated links of gold versus common iron links I find interesting. But that is just me.


Charles Dickens: Bleak House
28. CHAPTER XXVIII: The Ironmaster

Sir Leicester Dedlock has got the better, for the time being, of the family gout and is once more, in a literal no less than in a figurative point of view, upon his legs. He is at his place in Lincolnshire; but the waters are out again on the low-lying grounds, and the cold and damp steal into Chesney Wold, though well defended, and eke into Sir Leicester's bones. The blazing fires of faggot and coal--Dedlock timber and antediluvian forest--that blaze upon the broad wide hearths and wink in the twilight on the frowning woods, sullen to see how trees are sacrificed, do not exclude the enemy. The hot-water pipes that trail themselves all over the house, the cushioned doors and windows, and the screens and curtains fail to supply the fires' deficiencies and to satisfy Sir Leicester's need. Hence the fashionable intelligence proclaims one morning to the listening earth that Lady Dedlock is expected shortly to return to town for a few weeks.

It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations. Indeed great men have often more than their fair share of poor relations, inasmuch as very red blood of the superior quality, like inferior blood unlawfully shed, WILL cry aloud and WILL be heard. Sir Leicester's cousins, in the remotest degree, are so many murders in the respect that they "will out." Among whom there are cousins who are so poor that one might almost dare to think it would have been the happier for them never to have been plated links upon the Dedlock chain of gold, but to have been made of common iron at first and done base service.

Service, however (with a few limited reservations, genteel but not profitable), they may not do, being of the Dedlock dignity. So they visit their richer cousins, and get into debt when they can, and live but shabbily when they can't, and find--the women no husbands, and the men no wives--and ride in borrowed carriages, and sit at feasts that are never of their own making, and so go through high life. The rich family sum has been divided by so many figures, and they are the something over that nobody knows what to do with.

Bleak House--rest of Chapter xxviii.


Bleak House---complete story.


Please thank www.literaturepage.come for the above quote in context and the complete story.


peace out, >^,,^<
1dreamer
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 5:30:55 AM
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It is a melancholy truth that "great men" spoil the possible relations of the simple men.




Daemon wrote:
<script>add2all('quote')</script><img align=left width="100" height="117" src="http://img.tfd.com/IOD/dickens.jpg">It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.<br><br><a href="http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Dickens,+Charles">Charles Dickens</a> (1812-1870)
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 6:46:57 AM
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Kitten, I wanted to thank literaturepage by using your link, but it just wouldn't come up. But then I typed COM and it cam.

The correct link to The Literature Page is ... erm it's gon.
kitten
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 7:21:23 AM
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IMcRout wrote:
Kitten, I wanted to thank literaturepage by using your link, but it just wouldn't come up. But then I typed COM and it cam.

The correct link to The Literature Page is ... erm it's gon.



Hello IMc,


Thank you so much for putting up the correct link.....I see that I added an extra 'e' d'oh! I wonder why it took the highlighted link at all???????? Not for me to understand or know why? Boo hoo!

But, I do thank you for the correction.


peace out, >^,,^<
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 7:34:05 AM
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You'r wlcom, Kittn. I hav troubls with my nw kyboard at th momnt.
MTC
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 8:05:36 AM
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Reading Dickens is like running your hands through the treasure trove of the English language. Verbal gems sparkle in rich abundance everywhere. For example, litigation over multiple wills drives the plot in Bleak House. Through wills the past controls the present, sometimes in pernicious ways. Dickens chose the name "Dedlock," in part because it suggests the Dead Hand of the past, which TFD defines as follows:

dead hand
n.
1. The ever-present, oppressive influence of past events: "Psychotherapy explores the ways in which the past has shaped people, and how its dead hand continues to deform their lives" (James S. Gordon).
2. Mortmain.
[Middle English dede hond, translation of Old French mortemain or Medieval Latin manus mortua, mortmain.]

In Bleak House "Dedlock" is a metaphor for that same oppressive influence.

In yet another apt metaphor Dickens describes the "poor relations" as "the something over"
after the long division of family wealth. The bitter remainder, as it were.

There is no end to Dickens' verbal inventiveness.

Maggie
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 1:05:39 PM
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jcbarros wrote:
Great men? What´s that?


That should have been "Grate Men". You'll find them as a specialized category under 'Chef's Assistants'.

Angel
jcbarros
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 1:15:39 PM

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You´re quite right Maggie.Angel
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 2:24:42 PM
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I am still looking for that great man among my next of kin.

Uncle Scrooge, where are you?
maximien
Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 4:08:18 PM
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Maggie wrote:
jcbarros wrote:
Great men? What´s that?


That should have been "Grate Men". You'll find them as a specialized category under 'Chef's Assistants'.

Angel


This is absolutely loverly, thanks for your remark! Applause
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