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How great would be the desire in every admirer of nature to behold, if such were possible, the scenery of another planet! Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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How great would be the desire in every admirer of nature to behold, if such were possible, the scenery of another planet!

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 5:02:16 AM

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Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
Good idea. Now we have seen the landscapes of other planets. What remains to be desired is finding a planet with a biosphere.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 8:02:08 AM

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Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
engilish writer

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 8:25:29 AM

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Context from THE VOYAGE OF THE BEAGLE

DAY 160 OF 164

On leaving Ascension, we sailed for Bahia, on the coast of Brazil, in order to complete the chronometrical measurement of the world. We arrived there on August 1st, and stayed four days, during which I took several long walks. I was glad to find my enjoyment in tropical scenery had not decreased from the want of novelty, even in the slightest degree. The elements of the scenery are so simple that they are worth mentioning, as a proof on what trifling circumstances exquisite natural beauty depends.

The country may be described as a level plain of about three hundred feet in elevation, which in all parts has been worn into flat-bottomed valleys. This structure is remarkable in a granitic land, but is nearly universal in all those softer formations of which plains are usually composed. The whole surface is covered by various kinds of stately trees, interspersed with patches of cultivated ground, out of which houses, convents, and chapels arise. It must be remembered that within the tropics the wild luxuriance of nature is not lost even in the vicinity of large cities: for the natural vegetation of the hedges and hill-sides overpowers in picturesque effect the artificial labour of man. Hence, there are only a few spots where the bright red soil affords a strong contrast with the universal clothing of green. From the edges of the plain there are distant views either of the ocean, or of the great Bay with its low-wooded shores, and on which numerous boats and canoes show their white sails. Excepting from these points, the scene is extremely limited; following the level pathways, on each hand, only glimpses into the wooded valleys below can be obtained. The houses I may add, and especially the sacred edifices, are built in a peculiar and rather fantastic style of architecture. They are all whitewashed; so that when illumined by the brilliant sun of mid-day, and as seen against the pale blue sky of the horizon, they stand out more like shadows than real buildings.

Such are the elements of the scenery, but it is a hopeless attempt to paint the general effect. Learned naturalists describe these scenes of the tropics by naming a multitude of objects, and mentioning some characteristic feature of each. To a learned traveller this possibly may communicate some definite ideas: but who else from seeing a plant in an herbarium can imagine its appearance when growing in its native soil? Who from seeing choice plants in a hothouse can magnify some into the dimensions of forest trees, and crowd others into an entangled jungle? Who when examining in the cabinet of the entomologist the gay exotic butterflies, and singular cicadas, will associate with these lifeless objects the ceaseless harsh music of the latter and the lazy flight of the former,—the sure accompaniments of the still, glowing noonday of the tropics? It is when the sun has attained its greatest height that such scenes should be viewed: then the dense splendid foliage of the mango hides the ground with its darkest shade, whilst the upper branches are rendered from the profusion of light of the most brilliant green. In the temperate zones the case is different—the vegetation there is not so dark or so rich, and hence the rays of the declining sun, tinged of a red, purple, or bright yellow colour, add most to the beauties of those climes.

When quietly walking along the shady pathways, and admiring each successive view, I wished to find language to express my ideas. Epithet after epithet was found too weak to convey to those who have not visited the intertropical regions the sensation of delight which the mind experiences. I have said that the plants in a hothouse fail to communicate a just idea of the vegetation, yet I must recur to it. The land is one great wild, untidy, luxuriant hothouse, made by Nature for herself, but taken possession of by man, who has studded it with gay houses and formal gardens. How great would be the desire in every admirer of nature to behold, if such were possible, the scenery of another planet! yet to every person in Europe, it may be truly said, that at the distance of only a few degrees from his native soil the glories of another world are opened to him. In my last walk I stopped again and again to gaze on these beauties, and endeavoured to fix in my mind for ever an impression which at the time I knew sooner or later must fail. The form of the orange-tree, the cocoa-nut, the palm, the mango, the tree-fern, the banana, will remain clear and separate; but the thousand beauties which unite these into one perfect scene must fade away: yet they will leave, like a tale heard in childhood, a picture full of indistinct, but most beautiful figures.

Read more : http://www.turtlereader.com/authors/charles-darwin/the-voyage-of-the-beagle-day-160-of-167/

Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 12:16:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
How great would be the desire in every admirer of nature to behold, if such were possible, the scenery of another planet!

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)


For mercy's sake, some desires are better left undone, if such were possible...
Corvette King
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 3:51:33 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/16/2017
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Neurons: 131
Location: Alton, Illinois, United States
i would like to see another planet. i think it would be awesome.
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