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Civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof.

John F. Kennedy (1917-1963)
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 2:03:24 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof.

John F. Kennedy (1917-1963)
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 2:53:38 AM

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John Fitzgerald Kennedy
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to John Fitzgerald Kennedy: JFK, Lee Harvey Oswald, Marilyn Monroe, Ronald Reagan, RFK
Kennedy, John Fitzgerald, 1917–63, 35th President of the United States (1961–63), b. Brookline, Mass.; son of Joseph P. Kennedy

.
Early Life

While an undergraduate at Harvard (1936–40) he served briefly in London as secretary to his father, who was ambassador there. His Harvard honors thesis on the British failure to judge the threat of Nazi Germany was published as Why England Slept (1940). Enlisting in the navy in Sept., 1941, he became commander of a PT boat in the Pacific in World War II

. In action off the Solomon Islands (Aug., 1943), his boat, PT 109, was sunk, and Kennedy was credited with saving the life of at least one of his crew.
Congressional Career

As a Congressman from Massachusetts (1947–53), Jack Kennedy consistently supported the domestic programs of the Truman



administration but criticized its China policy. In 1952, despite the Eisenhower



landslide, he defeated Henry Cabot Lodge

for a seat in the U.S. Senate, where he served on the Labor and Public Welfare and Foreign Relations committees. In 1953, Kennedy married Jacqueline Lee Bouvier (see Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy

). While recuperating in 1955 from an operation to repair a spinal problem, one of the many serious and often extremely painful illnesses that plagued him from childhood until his death, he wrote Profiles in Courage (1956). The book dealt with American political leaders who defied public opinion to vote according to their consciences; for this work (later revealed to have been written in part by Theodore Sorensen and others) he received the Pulitzer Prize. Although Kennedy narrowly lost the Democratic vice presidential nomination in 1956, his overwhelming reelection as Senator in 1958 helped him toward the goal of presidential candidacy.
Presidency

In 1960 he entered and won seven presidential primaries and captured the Democratic nomination on the first ballot. To balance the ticket, he selected Lyndon B. Johnson



as his vice presidential candidate. In the campaign that followed, Kennedy engaged in a series of televised debates with his Republican opponent, Richard M. Nixon



. Defeating Nixon by a narrow popular margin, Kennedy became at 43 the youngest person ever, and the first Catholic, elected President.

Soon after his inaugural, Kennedy set out his domestic program, known as the New Frontier: tax reform, federal aid to education, medical care for the aged under Social Security, enlargement of civil rights through executive action, aid to depressed areas, and an accelerated space program. He was almost immediately, however, caught up in foreign affairs crises. The first (Apr., 1961) was the abortive Bay of Pigs Invasion

of Cuba by Cuban exiles trained and aided by the Central Intelligence Agency. Although the invasion had been planned under Eisenhower, Kennedy had approved it, and was widely criticized.

with my pleasure
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 2:42:21 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof.

John F. Kennedy (1917-1963)


Civility is not a sign of weakness or strength, it is a sign of good manners...
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 5:16:29 PM

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Context from: Inaugural Address of President John F. Kennedy
Washington, D.C.
January 20, 1961


Finally, to those nations who would make themselves our adversary, we offer not a pledge but a request: that both sides begin anew the quest for peace, before the dark powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction.

We dare not tempt them with weakness. For only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed.

But neither can two great and powerful groups of nations take comfort from our present course--both sides overburdened by the cost of modern weapons, both rightly alarmed by the steady spread of the deadly atom, yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind's final war.

So let us begin anew--remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate.

Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us.

Let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms--and bring the absolute power to destroy other nations under the absolute control of all nations.

Let both sides seek to invoke the wonders of science instead of its terrors. Together let us explore the stars, conquer the deserts, eradicate disease, tap the ocean depths and encourage the arts and commerce.

https://www.jfklibrary.org/Research/Research-Aids/Ready-Reference/JFK-Quotations/Inaugural-Address.aspx


Verbatim
Posted: Thursday, November 02, 2017 6:51:05 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 1,997
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Daemon wrote:
Civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof.

John F. Kennedy (1917-1963)


After 56 years, look how far it took us, this noble political sentiment.
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