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My toast would be, may our country always be successful, but whether successful or otherwise, always right. Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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My toast would be, may our country always be successful, but whether successful or otherwise, always right.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 1:15:21 AM

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Quotation of the Day

My toast would be, may our country always be successful, but whether successful or otherwise, always right.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848)
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 7:57:44 AM

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John Quincy Adams
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Related to John Quincy Adams: Henry Clay
Adams, John Quincy, 1767–1848, 6th President of the United States (1825–29), b. Quincy (then in Braintree), Mass.; son of John Adams

and Abigail Adams

and father of Charles Francis Adams

(1807–86). He accompanied his father on missions to Europe, gaining broad knowledge from study and travel—he even accompanied (1781–83) Francis Dana

to Russia—before returning home to graduate (1787) from Harvard and study law. Washington appointed (1794) him minister to the Netherlands, and in his father's administration he was minister to Prussia (1797–1801).

In 1803 he became a U.S. senator as a Federalist, but his independence led him to approve Jeffersonian policies in the Louisiana Purchase



and in the Embargo Act of 1807

; the Federalists were outraged, and he resigned (1808). Sent as minister to Russia in 1809, he was well received, but the Napoleonic wars eclipsed Russian-American relations. He then helped to draw up the Treaty of Ghent

(1814), and served as minister to Great Britain. As secretary of state (1817–25) under James Monroe



, Adams gained enduring fame. He negotiated a major treaty with Spain, which secured for the United States a great expanse of land that stretched to the Pacific. Perhaps most notably, Adams was also the architect of the somewhat misleadingly named Monroe Doctrine

(1823).

In 1824 Adams was a candidate for the U.S. presidency. Neither he, nor Andrew Jackson



, nor Henry Clay



received a majority in the electoral college, and the election was decided in the House of Representatives. There Clay supported Adams, making him president. Adams appointed Clay secretary of state, over the Jacksonians' cry that the appointment fulfilled a corrupt bargain. With little popular support and without a party, Adams had an unhappy, ineffective administration, despite his attempts to institute a broad program of internal improvements.

After Jackson won the 1828 election, Adams retired to Quincy, but returned to new renown as a U.S. representative (1831–48). His eloquence, persistence, and moral forcefulness brought an end (1844) to the House gag rule on debate about slavery, and he attacked all other measures that would extend that institution, as well as Jackson's forced removal of southeastern tribes (1837) and the 1846 invasion of Mexico.

Cold and introspective, Adams was not generally popular, but he was respected for his high-mindedness and knowledge. His interest in science led him to promote the Smithsonian Institution

. His diary (selections ed. by C. F. Adams, 12 vol., 1874–77, repr. 1970; abridged by A. Nevins, 1928 and 1951) is a valuable document. Most of his writings were edited by W. C. Ford (7 vol., 1913–17); some appear in The Selected Writings of John and John Quincy Adams (ed. by A. Koch and W. Peden, 1946).
Bibliography

See the definitive biography by S. F. Bemis (2 vol., 1949–56) and biographies by J. T. Morse (1883, repr. 1972), B. C. Clark (1932), P. C. Nagel (1997), R. V. Remini (2002), F. Kaplan (2014), and J. Traub (2016); J. T. Adams, The Adams Family (1930); M. B. Hecht, John Quincy Adams: A Personal History of Independence (1972); R. Brookhiser, America's First Dynasty: The Adamses, 1735–1918 (2002).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

with my pleasure
azbnb
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 12:45:59 PM

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still a great toast after all these years

The Mountains are CALLING And I must go - John Muir
azbnb
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 12:46:02 PM

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Joined: 10/14/2014
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Location: Kalispell, Montana, United States
still a great toast after all these years

The Mountains are CALLING And I must go - John Muir
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 12:49:41 PM
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Daemon wrote:
My toast would be, may our country always be successful, but whether successful or otherwise, always right.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848)


Yeah. The successful country is always right even if it's obviously wrong... Right?
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 6:31:47 PM
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Daemon wrote:
My toast would be, may our country always be successful, but whether successful or otherwise, always right.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848)


Always right, the rest should take care of itself.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 7:12:48 PM

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Joined: 2/4/2014
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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia


The complete quote from: Letter to his father, John Adams (1 August 1816), referring to the popular phrase "My Country, Right or Wrong!" based upon Stephen Decatur's famous statement "Our Country! In her intercourse with foreign nations may she always be in the right, but our country, right or wrong." The Latin phrase is one that can be translated as : "Let justice be done though heaven should fall" or "though heaven perish"


“I can never join with my voice in the toast which I see in the papers attributed to one of our gallant naval heroes. I cannot ask of heaven success, even for my country, in a cause where she should be in the wrong. Fiat justitia, pereat coelum. My toast would be, may our country always be successful, but whether successful or otherwise, always right.”


https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/John_Quincy_Adams

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