The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Trichotillomania Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 22,026
Neurons: 66,081
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Trichotillomania

Also commonly known as TTM and "trich," trichotillomania is an impulse control disorder characterized by the repeated urge to pull out one's hair. Classified by many clinicians as a habit behavior that falls into the same class as nail biting, TTM has no cure but can sometimes be managed with habit reversal training and pharmacotherapy. It is estimated that up to 5% of the world's population has TTM. In recent years, the number of reported TTM cases has increased, a fact some attribute to what? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 1:49:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 2,005
Neurons: 1,975,780
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Article of the Day
Trichotillomania
Also commonly known as TTM and "trich," trichotillomania is an impulse control disorder characterized by the repeated urge to pull out one's hair. Classified by many clinicians as a habit behavior that falls into the same class as nail biting, TTM has no cure but can sometimes be managed with habit reversal training and pharmacotherapy. It is estimated that up to 5% of the world's population has TTM.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 8:55:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 759
Neurons: 68,526
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq

trichotillomania
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Trichotillomania
Trichotillomania
Classification and external resources

A pattern of incomplete hair loss on the scalp of a person with trichotillomania
ICD-10 F63.3
ICD-9 312.39
DiseasesDB 29681
MedlinePlus 001517
eMedicine derm/433 ped/2298

Trichotillomania (pronounced /ˌtrɪkəˌtɪləˈmeɪniə/ TRIK-ə-TIL-ə-MAY-NEE-ə, also known as trichotillosis) is the compulsive urge to pull out (and in some cases, eat) one's own hair leading to noticeable hair loss, distress, and social or functional impairment. It is classified as an impulse control disorder by DSM-IV and is often chronic and difficult to treat.[1]

Trichotillomania may be present in infants, but the peak age of onset is 9 to 13. It may be triggered by depression or stress. Due to social implications the disorder is often unreported and it is difficult to accurately predict its prevalence; the lifetime prevalence is estimated to be between 0.6% (overall) and may be as high as 1.5% (in males) to 3.4% (in females). Common areas for hair to be pulled out are the scalp, eyelashes, eyebrows, arms, hands, and pubic hairs.

The name, coined by French dermatologist François Henri Hallopeau, derives from the Greek: trich- (hair), till(en) (to pull), and mania ("madness, frenzy").[2]
Classification

Trichotillomania is defined as a self-induced and recurrent loss of hair.[3] It includes the criterion of an increasing sense of tension before pulling the hair and gratification or relief when pulling the hair.[1] However, some people with trichotillomania do not endorse the inclusion of "rising tension and subsequent pleasure, gratification, or relief" as part of the criteria;[1] because many individuals with trichotillomania may not realize they are pulling their hair, patients presenting for diagnosis may deny the criteria for tension prior to hair pulling or a sense of gratification after hair is pulled.[3]

Trichotillomania may lie on the obsessive-compulsive spectrum, also encompassing obsessive-compulsive disorder, nail biting (onychophagia) and skin picking (dermatillomania), tic disorders and eating disorders. These conditions may share clinical features, genetic contributions, and possibly treatment response; however, differences between trichotillomania and OCD are present in symptoms, neural function and cognitive profile.[1] In the sense that it is associated with irresistible urges to perform unwanted repetitive behavior, trichotillomania

with my pleasure
fhaubert
Posted: Friday, October 27, 2017 11:41:42 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/11/2017
Posts: 5
Neurons: 17,215
Location: Garopaba, Santa Catarina, Brazil
It has no cure??? If it is a behavior disorder, NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming) can deal with it. Why everything has to go to drugs and pharmacology? Yes, I know why. NLP cures that as well as many other behavior disorders, that's my point. Enjoy it!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.