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The Pyramid of the Magician Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, October 20, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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The Pyramid of the Magician

The central structure in the ancient Mayan complex of Uxmal, Mexico, the Pyramid of the Magician is a step pyramid that was begun in the 6th century and expanded over the next 400 years. At the time, new temple pyramids were commonly built atop older ones, and this pyramid is the result of five nested temples. With its rounded sides, considerable height, steep slope, and elliptical base, the structure represents the pinnacle of late Maya art and architecture. How did it get its mysterious name? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 1:47:42 AM

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The Pyramid of the Magician
The central structure in the ancient Mayan complex of Uxmal, Mexico, the Pyramid of the Magician is a step pyramid that was begun in the 6th century and expanded over the next 400 years. At the time, new temple pyramids were commonly built atop older ones, and this pyramid is the result of five nested temples. With its rounded sides, considerable height, steep slope, and elliptical base, the structure represents the pinnacle of late Maya art and architecture.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 8:56:39 AM

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Pyramid of the Magician
Pyramid of the Magician
Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal, Mexico. March 2007

The Pyramid of the Magician (Spanish: Pirámide del adivino) is a Mesoamerican step pyramid located in the ancient, Pre-Columbian city of Uxmal, Mexico. The structure is also referred to as the Pyramid of the Dwarf, Casa el Adivino, and the Pyramid of the Soothsayer. The pyramid is the tallest and most recognizable structure in Uxmal.
Description

The Pyramid of the Magician (El Adivino) is the central structure in the Maya ruin complex of Uxmal. The Pyramid of the Magician is also referred to as the Pyramid of the Soothsayer.[1] Uxmal is located in the Puuc region of Mexico and was one of the largest cities on the Yucatán Peninsula. At its height, Uxmal was home to about 25,000 Maya. Like other Puuc sites, the city flourished from 600-1000 AD, with the great building period taking place between 700 and 1000 AD. The name Uxmal means 'thrice-built' in the Mayan language, referring to the many layers of construction of its most imposing structure.

The city of Uxmal was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996 as it is considered that the ruins of the ceremonial structures represent the pinnacle of late Maya art and architecture in their design, layout and ornamentation. The Pyramid of the Magician dominates the center of the complex and is located at the tourist entrance to the central court. It is positioned on the eastern side of the city, with its western face overlooking the Nunnery Quadrangle and is situated so that its western stairway faces the setting sun at the summer solstice.

Construction of the first pyramid temple began in the 6th century AD and the structure was expanded over the next 400 years. The pyramid fell into disrepair after 1000 A.D. and was thereafter looted during the Spanish Conquest of Yucatán.

The first detailed account of the rediscovery of the ruins was published by Jean-Frederic Waldeck in 1838. Waldeck’s account of Uxmal inspired John Lloyd Stephens and his illustrator friend, Frederick Catherwood, to make two extended visits to the site in 1839-1841, to record and sketch the layout of the complex. From his notes, Stephens published his now famous Incidents of Travel in the Yucatan.
"House of the Magician" in 1913

Restoration efforts began in Uxmal in the mid-19th century. The Pyramid of the Magician was regularly repaired and maintained during this period. In the early 1970s, a major conservation project was undertaken by archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH). The aim of this effort was to consolidate the sides and flat terraces of the pyramid, and to improve the structural integrity of the temples. In 1988, Hurricane Gilbert swept across the Yucatán Peninsula, bringing high winds and abundant rainfall to the area which caused extensive damage to exterior of the pyramid. A post-hurricane examination of the structure revealed cracks that had developed in the walls of the south side, on both sides of the west stairway. Damage to the vertical walls at the base of the pyramid, on the west side, was also noted.

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 10:22:42 AM

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Spectacular structure. They whole Mayan civilization is fabulous.
azbnb
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 5:42:57 PM

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How did it get its name? That's what they named it, that's how! Hahahahahhaaaaaaa

The Mountains are CALLING And I must go - John Muir
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