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Please correct me Options
prince
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 5:50:05 AM
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Could somebody please correct me if i was wrong in saying

1)Correct your behavior lest people will start abominise you. and to tell the truth your own Girl friend has been abominising you.

2)Eflotery is the synonym of audacious ( Please coreect me if it eflotery or someother word which sounds same).

Thanks and Regards
Your's Prince
abcxyz
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 5:57:51 AM

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'Abominise' is not in the dictionary. Did you mean 'abominate'?

1) Correct your behavior before people start abominating you, and to tell the truth your own girlfriend abominates you.

As for 2), eflotery is not a word and I cannot remember a word that sounds close to it that means audacious. The only word that comes to my mind is flattery, but it does not mean audacious.
intelfam
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 6:03:59 AM

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abcxyz wrote:
'Abominise' is not in the dictionary. Did you mean 'abominate'?

1) Correct your behavior before people start abominating you, and to tell the truth your own girlfriend abominates you.

As for 2), eflotery is not a word and I cannot remember a word that sounds close to it that means audacious. The only word that comes to my mind is flattery, but it does not mean audacious.


Perhaps effrontery?

For myself, the word abominate is far too strong. In the UK we abominate extremes of behaviour which have a wider social effect. I would suggest "reject" or even (if you like long words) "anathematise", although, on balance reject, dislike, seem about right. What is this person doing to call down such rejection?
prince
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 6:18:58 AM
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effrontery is what im looking for. yhank u very much sir.
jmacann
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 6:56:55 AM
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You know the context better, of course -though perhaps "lest" sounds a bit paternalistic.
songbird6
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 7:40:38 AM

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Admonish is the word.
. . . "before people (will) start to admonish you." Admonish means to reprimand or express disapproval.
blue2
Posted: Wednesday, July 27, 2011 9:01:42 AM

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[quote=prince]Could somebody please correct me if i was wrong in saying

1)Correct your behavior lest people will start abominise you. and to tell the truth your own Girl friend has been abominising you.

Abominise is not a word, abominate is. (Ah, sorry intelfam, just noticed you already said that but I don't want to change everything again!) And it is a very strong word. But if she abominated him, she would not be his girlfriend. Besides, it is a feeling and doesn't take a continuous tense.

Admonish works in the way songbird6 sets it out, except for will which doesn't follow before, but definitely not the second sentence. If she had been admonishing him, he would know it.


I would say:
Correct your behaviour lest people start avoiding/criticising you. And to tell the truth, your own girl friend has been criticising you.

criticise is something you can do behind someone's back

If you really want the word abominate, it can work in the first sentence. But it is the start that isn't right. Since it is such a strong word, you don't just start it, it happens gradually. That's why I used the other words.

You could say;
Correct your behaviour or (before long) people will abominate/admonish you. - But I still don't really like it. Maybe that's just me.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 1:37:50 AM
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Blue et. al -

I completely agree with you and others who have (metaphorically) raised their eyebrows at words such as abominate and lest being used in modern BE or AE.

However, from the evidence of other posters on this forum, I have gained the impression that Indian English differs quite a lot these days from Standard English and the use of words that sound uxurious or unacceptably formal is quite common?

On the other hand, Prince, if what you are doing is trying to write English sentences with a Thesaurus in hand (a feeling gained from the fact that you described the non-word eflotery as a synonym of another word rather than assigning it a meaning of its own) then STOP!! There have been many threads here that have gone into great detail as to why this is a bad practice - perhaps you could look at a couple of them?

Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 1:40:57 AM
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Prince...

Uh sorry - I guess I was in Teacher mode when I wrote the above. I didn't mean to be telling you what you can or can't do and am sorry if it sounded like that: what I should rather have said is that it is niether advisable nor helpful to take that course of action. But, of course, I have no right to tell you to STOP doing it. Sorry once more.
abcxyz
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 6:15:06 AM

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Romany wrote:
However, from the evidence of other posters on this forum, I have gained the impression that Indian English differs quite a lot these days from Standard English and the use of words that sound uxurious or unacceptably formal is quite common?


Indian English differs from AE/BE in many ways, but using overly formal words is usually frowned upon. However, with certain new trends emerging, good English is nowadays defined by the strength of one's vocabulary. Some business management institutes test the applicants' English skills by mostly vocab questions. Maybe prince is preparing for some of those tests?
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 12:07:37 PM
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abcxyz -

Personally, I'm sorry to hear that. How much better it would be if an applicant's communication skills were to be tested!
abcxyz
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 12:33:00 PM

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Yes - actually they try to do that in personal interviews and group discussions, but thanks to the tutorial homes, applicants can be prepared for even those without much communication skills. It's a mugger's paradise.
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 12:59:17 PM

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Effrontery would be a synonym for audacity in the specific context of an act of impertinence or rudeness. Other synonyms might be gall, front ( more colloquial ), nerve or cheek. Audacity also has a more positive side, that of daring bravery.
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