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Massive Hole Appears In Antarctic Ice and Scientists Aren't Sure Why Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 5:00:00 AM
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Massive Hole Appears In Antarctic Ice and Scientists Aren't Sure Why

A vast hole has re-opened in Antarctica, and it could have something to teach us about climate change. Some 40 years after satellites observed a wintertime gap in the ice of the Weddell Sea near the Antarctic Peninsula, the phenomenon has returned; and ... More...
ghorbanpour
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 10:57:01 AM
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Deamon, the climate change and its impact on the surface of the water and ice on Earth are really worrying!
FounDit
Posted: Monday, January 22, 2018 4:47:52 PM

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Nothing to worry about ghorbanpour. Note that the hole appeared 40 years ago and closed up again. Like they said in the article, it's called a "Polynya" and: "...GEOMAR has posited a model that explains the polynya as part of natural climate processes."

Some models say it will never reappear, but some models say that is wrong. So all they have to go on are models that they create themselves. Add to that fact Mr. Erebus, which is a volcano in Antarctica that has erupted for over 1 million years, (200 times between 1986 and 1990 alone), and you can see the area is not static.

"The Southern Ocean is strongly stratified. A very cold but relatively fresh water layer covers a much warmer and saltier water mass, thus acting as an insulating layer," Prof. Dr. Mojib Latif, head of the Research Division at GEOMAR, told the site.

Sometimes, the layer of warm water can then melt the ice. "This is like opening a pressure relief valve—the ocean then releases a surplus of heat to the atmosphere for several consecutive winters until the heat reservoir is exhausted," Latif said.

Dr. Mojib Latif, head of the Research Division at GEOMAR, who as a scientist should know better than to assume facts not in evidence, but does so anyway, closes with this statement:
"The better we understand these natural processes, the better we can identify the anthropogenic impact on the climate system," Latif said.

Nothing in this article indicates humans had any influence whatsoever on anything occurring there.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
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