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I believe that Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches as she does in purple and fine linen. Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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I believe that Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches as she does in purple and fine linen.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
zina antoaneta
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 2:21:11 AM

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True.
However, poverty has been frequently and successfully viewed as a means to buy away one's virtue, for hunger is seldom its friend.
Murali Mohan
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 5:45:35 AM

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Virtue is an attribute of man independent of his riches.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 6:40:13 AM

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Context from : Speeches: Literary and Social, by Charles Dickens

SPEECH: FEBRUARY 1842

But the objects and purposes I have had in view are very plain and simple, and may be easily told. I have always had, and always shall have, an earnest and true desire to contribute, as far as in me lies, to the common stock of healthful cheerfulness and enjoyment. I have always had, and always shall have, an invincible repugnance to that mole-eyed philosophy which loves the darkness, and winks and scowls in the light. I believe that Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches, as she does in purple and fine linen. I believe that she and every beautiful object in external nature, claims some sympathy in the breast of the poorest man who breaks his scanty loaf of daily bread. I believe that she goes barefoot as well as shod. I believe that she dwells rather oftener in alleys and by-ways than she does in courts and palaces, and that it is good, and pleasant, and profitable to track her out, and follow her. I believe that to lay one\'s hand upon some of those rejected ones whom the world has too long forgotten, and too often misused, and to say to the proudest and most thoughtless--\"These creatures have the same elements and capacities of goodness as yourselves, they are moulded in the same form, and made of the same clay; and though ten times worse than you, may, in having retained anything of their original nature amidst the trials and distresses of their condition, be really ten times better;\" I believe that to do this is to pursue a worthy and not useless vocation.

Read more :
https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/d/dickens/charles/d54sls/chapter3.html

ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 8:27:04 AM

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I can remember having read this passage, still I cannot remember which of his novels it is from.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 9:39:50 AM

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Charles Dickens
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Dickens, Charles, 1812–70, English author, b. Portsmouth, one of the world's most popular, prolific, and skilled novelists.
Early Life and Works
The son of a naval clerk, Dickens spent his early childhood in London and in Chatham. When he was 12 his father was imprisoned for debt, and Charles was compelled to work in a blacking warehouse. He never forgot this double humiliation. At 17 he was a court stenographer, and later he was an expert parliamentary reporter for the Morning Chronicle. His sketches, mostly of London life (signed Boz), began appearing in periodicals in 1833, and the collection Sketches by Boz (1836) was a success.
Soon Dickens was commissioned to write burlesque sporting sketches; the result was The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836–37), which promptly made Dickens and his characters, especially Sam Weller and Mr. Pickwick, famous. In 1836 he married Catherine Hogarth, who was to bear him 10 children; the marriage, however, was never happy. Dickens had a tender regard for Catherine's sister Mary Hogarth, who died young, and a lifelong friendship with another sister, Georgina Hogarth.
Maturity
The early-won fame never deserted Dickens. His readers were eager and ever more numerous, representing every English social strata—from barely literate factory workers to Queen Victoria—and Dickens worked vigorously for them, producing novels that appeared first in monthly installments and then were made into books. Oliver Twist (in book form, 1838) was followed by Nicholas Nickleby (1839) and by two works originally intended to start a series called Master Humphrey's Clock: The Old Curiosity Shop (1841) and Barnaby Rudge (1841). Throughout the mid-19th cent. Dickens was probably the best-known and most beloved man in England.
Dickens wrote rapidly, sometimes working on more than one novel at a time, and usually finished an installment just when it was due. Haste did not prevent his loosely strung and intricately plotted books from being the most popular novels of his day. When he visited America in 1842, he was received with ovations but awakened some displeasure by his remarks on copyright protection and his approval of the abolition of slavery. He replied with sharp criticism of America in American Notes (1842) and the novel Martin Chuzzlewit (1843). The first of his Christmas books was the well-loved A Christmas Carol (1843). In later years other short novels and stories written for the season followed, notably The Chimes and The Cricket on the Hearth.
Dickens lived in Italy in 1844 and in Switzerland in 1846. Dombey and Son (1848) was the first in a string of triumphant novels including David Copperfield (1850), his own favorite novel, which was partly autobiographical; Bleak House (1853); Hard Times (1854); Little Dorrit (1857); A Tale of Two Cities (1859); Great Expectations (1861); and Our Mutual Friend (1865). In 1856 he bought his long-desired country home at Gadshill. Two years later, because of Dickens's attentions to a young actress, Ellen Ternan, his wife ended their marriage by formal separation. Her sister Georgina remained with Dickens to care for his household and the younger children.
Dickens was working furiously, editing and contributing to the magazines Household Words (1850–59) and All the Year Round (1858–70) and managing amateur theatricals. To these labors he added platform readings from his own works; three tours in the British Isles (1858, 1861–65, 1866–67) were followed by one in America (1867–68). When he undertook another English tour of readings (1869–70), his health broke, and he died soon afterward, leaving his last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished. His grave is in Westminster Abbey.

with my pleasure
zina antoaneta
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 10:57:10 AM

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Murali Mohan wrote:
Virtue is an attribute of man independent of his riches.


Poverty doesn't bring unhappiness; it brings degradation.
George Bernard Shaw

Although I personally met many poor and happy people in India.
The reason was perhaps that they lived among other poor people and had enough to get by.
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 11:11:51 AM
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Daemon wrote:
I believe that Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches as she does in purple and fine linen.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


Virtue can show itself in any clothes just as well as Vice can do...
zina antoaneta
Posted: Wednesday, October 11, 2017 1:53:54 PM

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Location: Bucharest, Bucuresti, Romania
Daemon wrote:
I believe that Virtue shows quite as well in rags and patches as she does in purple and fine linen.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


It seems that I upset a lot of people with my previous comments.
I am sorry!
I wrote them for I had on my mind a reportage that CNN runs these days on the NFL trying to bring light on the human trafficking and child prostitution in the Dominican Republic. The sad part is that some of these children, like in a number of other poor countries, support their families this way. Am I going to judge these people as lacking virtue? Of course not! They become victims of their dire circumstances.
I believe that before we discuss the virtue of the poor, we should enable them to escape their poverty.
I have never meant to imply that the poor are less worthy than the more fortunate ones: many remarkable people came from humble beginnings.
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