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Harold Pinter (1930) Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Harold Pinter (1930)

One of the most important English playwrights of the late 20th century, Pinter wrote what have been called "comedies of menace." His austere, distinctive language, which provokes an ominous sense of unease, gave rise to the adjective "Pinteresque." His plays include The Birthday Party and The Homecoming, and he also wrote a number of screenplays. In 2005, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature. His 1978 play, Betrayal, was inspired by what betrayal in his own life? More...
karlajagan
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 8:03:18 AM
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For what I read, it seems like he was a great, achieved writer; not a great human been.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 11:34:27 AM

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Harold Pinter
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For other people named Pinter, see Pinter (surname).
Harold Pinter
Harold-pinter-atp.jpg
Pinter in December 2005
Born 10 October 1930
Hackney, London, England
Died 24 December 2008 (aged 78)
Acton, London, England
Occupation Playwright, screenwriter, actor, theatre director, poet
Nationality British
Period 1947–2008
Notable awards

Companion of Honour (2002)
Nobel Prize in Literature (2005)
Légion d'honneur (2007)
David Cohen Prize (1995)
Laurence Olivier Award (1996)

Spouse

Vivien Merchant (1956–1980; divorced)
Lady Antonia Fraser (1980–2008; his death)

Children

One son with Merchant,
six stepchildren with Fraser

Signature
Website
www.haroldpinter.org

Harold Pinter CH CBE (/ˈpɪntər/; 10 October 1930 – 24 December 2008) was a Nobel Prize-winning English playwright, screenwriter, director and actor. One of the most influential modern British dramatists, his writing career spanned more than 50 years. His best-known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted for the screen. His screenplay adaptations of others' works include The Servant (1963), The Go-Between (1971), The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981), The Trial (1993), and Sleuth (2007). He also directed or acted in radio, stage, television, and film productions of his own and others' works.

Pinter was born and raised in Hackney, east London, and educated at Hackney Downs School. He was a sprinter and a keen cricket player, acting in school plays and writing poetry. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art but did not complete the course. He was fined for refusing National service as a conscientious objector. Subsequently, he continued training at the Central School of Speech and Drama and worked in repertory theatre in Ireland and England. In 1956 he married actress Vivien Merchant and had a son, Daniel, born in 1958. He left Merchant in 1975 and married author Lady Antonia Fraser in 1980.

Pinter's career as a playwright began with a production of The Room in 1957. His second play, The Birthday Party, closed after eight performances, but was enthusiastically reviewed by critic Harold Hobson. His early works were described by critics as "comedy of menace". Later plays such as No Man's Land (1975) and Betrayal (1978) became known as "memory plays". He appeared as an actor in productions of his own work on radio and film. He also undertook a number of roles in works by other writers. He directed nearly 50 productions for stage, theatre and screen. Pinter received over 50 awards, prizes, and other honours, including the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2005 and the French Légion d'honneur in 2007.

Despite frail health after being diagnosed with oesophageal cancer in December 2001, Pinter continued to act on stage and screen, last performing the title role of Samuel Beckett's one-act monologue Krapp's Last Tape, for the 50th anniversary season of the Royal Court Theatre, in October 2006. He died from liver cancer on 24 December 2008.



with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, October 10, 2017 1:34:06 PM

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The description of his style arouses interest. Sincerely, I had not heard about the writer until today.
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