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History develops, art stands still. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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History develops, art stands still.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)
taurine
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 2:37:58 AM

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The response readies? Think
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 3:21:53 AM

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Quotation of the Day

History develops, art stands still.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 9:38:12 AM
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Daemon wrote:
History develops, art stands still.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)


Yeah. Because politicians have by far more imagination, sophistication and money than artists do...
FX2
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 11:22:28 AM
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Forster, E. M. (Edward Morgan Forster), 1879–1970, English author, one of the most important British novelists of the 20th cent. After graduating from Cambridge, Forster lived in Italy and Greece. During World War I he served with the International Red Cross in Egypt. In 1946, Forster became an honorary fellow of King's College, Cambridge, where he lived until his death. He received the Order of Merit in 1968.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 12:44:29 PM

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E. M. Forster
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Forster, E. M. (Edward Morgan Forster), 1879–1970, English author, one of the most important British novelists of the 20th cent. After graduating from Cambridge, Forster lived in Italy and Greece. During World War I he served with the International Red Cross in Egypt. In 1946, Forster became an honorary fellow of King's College, Cambridge, where he lived until his death. He received the Order of Merit in 1968.

Forster's fiction, conservative in form, is in the English tradition of the novel of manners. He explores the emotional and sensual deficiencies of the English middle class, and examines its relationship to other social classes, developing his themes by means of irony, wit, and symbolism. He also often treats the contrasts between human freedom and repression. His first novel, Where Angels Fear to Tread, appeared in 1905 and was followed in quick succession by The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908), and Howard's End (1910). His last and most widely acclaimed novel, A Passage to India (1924), treats the relations between a group of British colonials and native Indians and considers the difficulty of forming human relationships, of "connecting"; the novel also explores the nature of external and internal reality. Forster's short stories are collected in The Celestial Omnibus (1911) and The Eternal Moment (1928).

After 1928 he turned his attention increasingly to nonfiction. Notable collections of his essays and literary criticism are Abinger Harvest (1936) and Two Cheers for Democracy (1951). Aspects of the Novel (1927) is a major study of the novel and Forster's most important critical work. In 1971, Maurice, a novel Forster had written in 1913–14, was published posthumously. A homosexual, Forster had refrained from publishing it during his lifetime because of the work's sympathetic treatment of homosexuality. The story of a young man's self-awakening, Maurice treats a familiar Forster theme, the difficulty of human connection. His unpublished short stories and essays were published posthumously in Albergo Empedocle and Other Writings (1972). In all his works Forster's style is impeccable.
Bibliography

See his selected writings, ed. by G. B. Parker (1968); his selected letters, ed. by M. Lago and P. N. Furbank (2 vol., 1983–84); biographies by D. Godfrey (1968), P. N. Furbank (2 vol., 1978), C. J. Summers (1987), N. Beauman (1994), and W. Moffat (2010); studies by G. H. Thomson (1967), O. Stallybrass (1969), P. Gardner (1973) and as ed. (1984), P. J. Scott (1983), and F. Kermode (2009).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/


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monamagda
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 2:14:11 PM

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Context from:Aspects Of The Novel

Introduction

Page 39


They may decide to write a novel upon the French or the Russian Revolution, but memories, associations, passions, rise up and cloud their objectivity, so that at the close, when they reread, someone else seems to have been holding their pen. . . . All through history writers while writing have felt more or less the same. They have entered a common state which it is convenient to call inspiration, and having regard to that state we may say that History develops, Art stands still.





https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet.dli.2015.509170/2015.509170.Aspects-Of#page/n41/mode/2up
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 5:48:32 PM
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Daemon wrote:
History develops, art stands still.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)

How I wish that history would stand still,
Enough for lying yarns to fall off its quill!
Let her develop from that point as she will,
And damned be forever with all of her shill.
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