The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Otto Heinrich Warburg (1883) Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 21,756
Neurons: 65,271
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Otto Heinrich Warburg (1883)

Warburg was a German physiologist, Nobel Prize winner, and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute—now the Max Planck Institute—for cell physiology in Berlin. He was known for his investigation of the metabolism of tumors and the respiration of cells. His hypothesis that cancer cells switch from normal cellular respiration to glycolysis, the conversion of sugars, is now a noted phenomenon. In his later years, Warburg was said to have become somewhat eccentric and to have eaten only what? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 3:20:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 1,788
Neurons: 1,914,970
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Today's Birthday
Otto Heinrich Warburg (1883)
Warburg was a German physiologist, Nobel Prize winner, and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute—now the Max Planck Institute—for cell physiology in Berlin. He was known for his investigation of the metabolism of tumors and the respiration of cells. His hypothesis that cancer cells switch from normal cellular respiration to glycolysis, the conversion of sugars, is now a noted phenomenon.
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 3:20:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 1,788
Neurons: 1,914,970
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Today's Birthday
Otto Heinrich Warburg (1883)
Warburg was a German physiologist, Nobel Prize winner, and director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute—now the Max Planck Institute—for cell physiology in Berlin. He was known for his investigation of the metabolism of tumors and the respiration of cells. His hypothesis that cancer cells switch from normal cellular respiration to glycolysis, the conversion of sugars, is now a noted phenomenon.
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 11:13:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 5,635
Neurons: 3,631,975
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia


Eccentric food habits.

Warburg never married and showed little interest in social activities. Rather, he preferred working long hours and maintained his life-long interest in equestrian activities. In his later life, he apparently became somewhat eccentric regarding his eating habits, insisting on organic foods long before the current trend, even taking his own produce to restaurants.

Warburg was convinced that more cancers arose from chemical when applied for long periods of time.He became increasingly obsessed with avoiding food that had been treated with special chemicals ("additives"}. He had heard that bakers tend to get eczema and he thought that this had something to do with the bleaching chemicals added to te bread.Because of this he would not, when he could avoid it, eat bread from baker's shop. For the last 15 years or so of his life, he insisted on eating only bread baked by Heiss at home.

German-Jewish Pioneers in Science 1900–1933: Highlights in Atomic Physics ...
By D. Nachmansohn
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Sunday, October 08, 2017 12:43:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 527
Neurons: 50,263
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
Warburg, Otto Heinrich
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Otto Heinrich Warburg
See also: Warburg effect
Otto Heinrich Warburg
Otto Warburg.jpg
Otto Heinrich Warburg
Born October 8, 1883
Freiburg, Baden, German Empire
Died August 1, 1970 (aged 86)
Berlin, West Germany
Nationality German
Fields Cell biology
Institutions Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Biology
Alma mater University of Berlin
University of Heidelberg
Doctoral advisor Emil Fischer
Ludolf von Krehl
Known for Pathogenesis of cancer
Notable awards Iron Cross 1st class (1918)
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1931)
Pour le Mérite (Civil Class) (1952)

Otto Heinrich Warburg (October 8, 1883 – August 1, 1970), son of physicist Emil Warburg, was a German physiologist, medical doctor and Nobel laureate. He served as an officer in the elite Ulan (cavalry regiment) during the First World War, and won the Iron Cross (1st Class) for bravery. Warburg was one of the 20th century's leading biochemists.[1] He won the Nobel Prize of 1931. In total, he was nominated an unprecedented three times for the Nobel prize for three separate achievements.
Biography

Warburg's father, Emil Warburg, was a member of the illustrious Warburg family of Altona, who had converted to Christianity reportedly after a disagreement with his Conservative Jewish parents. Emil was also president of the Physikalische Reichsanstalt, Wirklicher Geheimer Oberregierungsrat (True Senior Privy Counselor). His mother was the daughter of a Protestant family of bankers and civil servants from Baden.

Warburg studied chemistry under the great Emil Fischer, and earned his Doctorate of Chemistry in Berlin in 1906. He then studied under Ludolf von Krehl, and earned the degree of Doctor of Medicine in Heidelberg in 1911.

Between 1908 and 1914, Warburg was affiliated with the Naples Marine Biological Station, in Naples, Italy, where he conducted research. In later years, he would return for visits, and maintained a lifelong friendship with the family of the station's director, Anton Dohrn.

A lifelong equestrian, he served as an officer in the elite Uhlans (cavalry) on the front during the First World War, where he won the Iron Cross. Warburg later credited this experience with affording him invaluable insights into "real life" outside the confines of academia. Towards the end of the war, when the outcome was unmistakable, Albert Einstein, who had been a friend of Warburg's father Emil, wrote Warburg at the behest of friends, asking him to leave the army and return to academia, since it would be a tragedy for the world to lose his talents. Einstein and Warburg later became friends, and Einstein's work in physics had great influence on Otto's biochemical research.[citation needed]
Scientific work and Nobel Prize
Otto Warburg, 1931

While working at the Marine Biological Station, Warburg performed research on oxygen consumption in sea urchin eggs after fertilization, and proved that upon fertilization, the rate of respiration increases by as much as sixfold. His experiments also proved iron is essential for the development of the larval stage.

In 1918, Warburg was appointed professor at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Biology in Berlin-Dahlem (part of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft). By 1931 he was named director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Cell Physiology, which was founded the previous year by a donation of the Rockefeller Foundation to the Kaiser Wilhelm Gesellschaft (since renamed the Max Planck Society).

Warburg investigated the metabolism of tumors and the respiration of cells, particularly cancer cells, and in 1931 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology for his "discovery of the nature and mode of action of the respiratory enzyme."[2] The award came after receiving 46 nominations over a period of nine years beginning in 1923, 13 of which were submitted in 1931, the year he won the prize.[3]

In 1944, Warburg was nominated for a second Nobel Prize in Physiology by Albert Szent-Györgyi, for his work on nicotinamide, the mechanism and enzymes involved in fermentation, and the discovery of flavine (in yellow enzymes).[4][5] Some sources reported he was selected to receive the award that year, but was prevented from receiving it by Adolf Hitler’s regime, which had issued a decree in 1937 that forbade Germans from accepting Nobel Prizes.[6][7] According to the Nobel Foundation, this rumor is not true; although he was considered a worthwhile candidate, he was not selected for the prize.[4]

Three scientists who worked in Warburg's lab, including Sir Hans Adolf Krebs, went on to win the Nobel Prize. Among other discoveries, Krebs is credited with the identification of the citric acid cycle (or Szentgyörgyi-Krebs cycle).

Warburg’s combined work in plant physiology, cell metabolism and oncology made him an integral figure in the later development of systems biology.[8] He worked with Dean Burk in photosynthesis to discover the I-quantum reaction that splits the CO2, activated by the respiration.[9]

with my pleasure
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.