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Egyptian President Anwar Sadat Is Assassinated (1981) Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Egyptian President Anwar Sadat Is Assassinated (1981)

As president, Sadat led Egypt in a 1973 war with Israel that bolstered his popularity throughout the Arab world, even though the war was a military loss. However, after he negotiated a peace treaty with Israel in the Camp David Accords—an initiative for which he shared a Nobel Peace Prize—his popularity in the Arab world plummeted. During an annual military parade, he was ambushed and killed by extremists. What three people made a rare simultaneous appearance at his funeral? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2017 3:15:50 AM

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This Day in History
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat Is Assassinated (1981)
As president, Sadat led Egypt in a 1973 war with Israel that bolstered his popularity throughout the Arab world, even though the war was a military loss. However, after he negotiated a peace treaty with Israel in the Camp David Accords—an initiative for which he shared a Nobel Peace Prize—his popularity in the Arab world plummeted. During an annual military parade, he was ambushed and killed by extremists.
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2017 3:15:51 AM

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Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
This Day in History
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat Is Assassinated (1981)
As president, Sadat led Egypt in a 1973 war with Israel that bolstered his popularity throughout the Arab world, even though the war was a military loss. However, after he negotiated a peace treaty with Israel in the Camp David Accords—an initiative for which he shared a Nobel Peace Prize—his popularity in the Arab world plummeted. During an annual military parade, he was ambushed and killed by extremists.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2017 7:32:02 AM

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Anwar al Sadat
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Related to Anwar al Sadat: Gamal Abdel Nasser
Anwar Al Sadat

Anwar Sadat
أنور السادات

Anwar Sadat cropped.jpg
Anwar Sadat in 1980.
President of the Arab Republic of Egypt
formerly President of the United Arab Republic
In office
Acting:28 September 1970 - 15 October 1970
15 October 1970 – 6 October 1981
Prime Minister
See list

Mahmoud Fawzi
Aziz Sedki
Himself
Abd El Aziz Muhammad Hegazi
Mamdouh Salem
Mustafa Khalil
Himself

Vice President
See list

Ali Sabri
Mahmoud Fawzi
Hosni Mubarak

Preceded by Gamal Abdel Nasser
Succeeded by Sufi Abu Taleb (Acting)
Hosni Mubarak
Prime Minister of Egypt
In office
15 May 1980 – 6 October 1981
President Himself
Preceded by Mustafa Khalil
Succeeded by Hosni Mubarak
In office
26 March 1973 – 25 September 1974
President Himself
Preceded by Aziz Sedki
Succeeded by Abd El Aziz Muhammad Hegazi
Vice President of Egypt
In office
19 December 1969 – 14 October 1970
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
Preceded by Hussein el-Shafei
Succeeded by Ali Sabri
In office
17 February 1964 – 26 March 1964
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
Preceded by Hussein el-Shafei
Succeeded by Zakaria Mohieddin
Speaker of the National Assembly of Egypt
In office
26 March 1964 – 12 November 1968
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
Preceded by Abdel Latif Boghdadi
Succeeded by Mohamed Labib Skokeir
In office
21 July 1960 – 27 September 1961
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
Preceded by Abdel Latif Boghdadi
Succeeded by Himself
Personal details
Born Anwar El Sadat
25 December 1918
El Monufia, Egypt
Died 6 October 1981 (aged 62)
Cairo, Egypt
Nationality Egyptian
Political party National Democratic Party
Other political
affiliations Arab Socialist Union
Spouse(s)

Ehsan Madi
Jehan Sadat

Religion Sunni Islam
Signature

Anwar El Sadat (Arabic: محمد أنور السادات‎ Muḥammad Anwar as-Sādāt Egyptian Arabic pronunciation: [mæˈħæmmæd ˈʔɑnwɑɾ essæˈdæːt]; 25 December 1918 – 6 October 1981) was the third President of Egypt, serving from 15 October 1970 until his assassination by fundamentalist army officers on 6 October 1981. Sadat was a senior member of the Free Officers who overthrew King Farouk in the Egyptian Revolution of 1952, and a close confidant of President Gamal Abdel Nasser, whom he succeeded as President in 1970.

In his eleven years as President, he changed Egypt's trajectory, departing from many of the political, and economic tents of Nasserism, re-instituting a multi-party system, and launching the Infitah economic policy. As President, he led Egypt in the October War of 1973 to liberate Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, which Israel had occupied since Six-Day War of 1967, making him a hero in Egypt and, for a time, the wider Arab World. Afterwards, he engaged in negotiations with Israel, culminating in the Egypt–Israel Peace Treaty. This won him the Nobel Peace Prize, but also made him unpopular among many Egyptians and other Arabs, and resulted in Egypt suspension from the Arab League from 1979 to 1989.[1][2][3][4] The peace treaty was also one of the primary factors that led to his assassination.
Early life and revolutionary activities

Anwar Sadat was born on 25 December 1918 in Mit Abu al-Kum, al-Minufiyah, Egypt to a poor family, one of 13 brothers and sisters.[5] One of his brothers, Atef Sadat, later became a pilot and was killed in action during the October War of 1973.[6] His father, Anwar Mohammed El Sadat was Egyptian, and his mother, Sit Al-Berain, was a Sudanese Nubian from her grandmother.[7][8] He spent his early childhood under the care of his grandmother, who told him stories revolving around resistance to the British occupation and drawing on contemporary history.[9] During Sadat's childhood, he admired and was influenced greatly by four individuals. The first of his childhood heroes was Zahran, the alleged hero of the Denshawai Incident, who resisted the British occupation in a farmer protest. According to the story, a British soldier was killed, and Zahran was the first Egyptian hanged in retribution. Stories like the Ballad of Zahran introduced Sadat to Egyptian nationalism, a value he held throughout his life.[9]

The second individual was Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, who was the leader of contemporary Turkey. Sadat admired his ability to overthrow the foreign influence, and his many social reforms. He also idolized Mahatma Gandhi and his belief in non-violent struggle or Ahimsa when facing injustice. As Egypt was under the occupation of the United Kingdom, Sadat was fascinated by Hitler's Nazi German army for their quick ability to become a strategic threat to Britain.[9]

He graduated from the Royal Military Academy in Cairo in 1938 and was appointed to the Signal Corps. He entered the army as a second lieutenant and was posted to Sudan (Egypt and Sudan were one country at the time). There, he met Gamal Abdel Nasser, and along with several other junior officers they formed the secret Free Officers, a movement committed to freeing Egypt and Sudan from British domination, and royal corruption.

During the Second World War he was imprisoned by the British for his efforts to obtain help from the Axis Powers in expelling the occupying British forces. Along with his fellow Free Officers, Sadat participated in the military coup that launched the Egyptian Revolution of 1952 which overthrew King Farouk on 23 July of that year. Sadat was assigned to announce the news of the revolution to the Egyptian people over the radio networks.
During Nasser's presidency
Speaker Sadat and President Gamal Abdel Nasser (right) in the National Assembly, 1964

During the presidency of Gamal Abdel Nasser, Sadat was appointed minister of State in 1954. He was also appointed editor of the newly founded daily Al Gomhuria.[10] In 1959, he assumed the position of Secretary to the National Union. Sadat was the President of the National Assembly (1960–1968) and then vice president and member of the presidential council in 1964. He was reappointed as vice president again in December 1969.
Presidency

Some of the major events of the Sadat's presidency were his "Corrective Revolution" to consolidate power, the break with Egypt's long-time ally and aid-giver the USSR, the 1973 October War with Israel, the Camp David peace treaty with Israel, the "opening up" (or Infitah) of Egypt's economy, and finally his assassination in 1981.

Sadat succeeded Nasser as president after the latter's death in October 1970.[11] Sadat's presidency was widely expected to be short-lived.[12] Viewing him as having been little more than a puppet of the former president, Nasser's supporters in government settled on Sadat as someone they could manipulate easily. Sadat surprised everyone with a series of astute political moves by which he was able to retain the presidency and emerge as a leader in his own right.[13] On 15 May 1971,[14] Sadat announced his Corrective Revolution, purging the government, political and security establishments of the most ardent Nasserists. Sadat encouraged the emergence of an Islamist movement which had been suppressed by Nasser. Believing Islamists to be socially conservative he gave them "considerable cultural and ideological autonomy" in exchange for political support.[15]

In 1971, three years into the War of Attrition in the Suez Canal zone, Sadat endorsed in a letter the peace proposals of UN negotiator Gunnar Jarring which seemed to lead to a full peace with Israel on the basis of Israel's withdrawal to its pre-war borders. This peace initiative failed as neither Israel nor the United States of America accepted the terms as discussed then.

Shortly after taking office, Sadat shocked many Egyptians by dismissing and imprisoning two of the most powerful figures in the regime, Vice President Ali Sabry, who had close ties with Soviet officials, and Sharawy Gomaa, the Interior Minister, who controlled the secret police.[12] Sadat's rising popularity would accelerate after he cut back the powers of the hated secret police,[12] expelled Soviet military from the country and reformed the Egyptian army for a renewed confrontation with Israel.[12] During this time, Egypt was suffering greatly from economic problems caused by the Six-Day War and the Soviet relationship also declined due to their unreliability and refusal of Sadat's requests for more military support.[9]
October War

On 6 October 1973, in conjunction with Hafez al-Assad of Syria, Sadat launched the October War, also known as the Yom Kippur War (and less commonly as the Ramadan War), a surprise attack against the Israeli forces occupying the Egyptian Sinai Peninsula, and the Syrian Golan Heights in an attempt to liberate these respective Egyptian, Syrian territories territory that had been occupied by Israel since the Six Day War six years earlier. The Egyptian and Syrian performance in the initial stages of the war astonished both Israel, and the Arab World. The m

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Friday, October 06, 2017 1:48:30 PM

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I still can very well remember how this assassination happened during a military parade.
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