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The Twilight Zone Premieres on CBS (1959) Options
Daemon
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The Twilight Zone Premieres on CBS (1959)

A classic science-fiction show that ran for just five years, The Twilight Zone was created by veteran television writer Rod Serling. More than half of its 155 unrelated episodes were written or co-written by Serling, who also narrated each half-hour episode with his trademark deadpan. The show often starred soon-to-be-famous actors such as William Shatner and Robert Redford. Many episodes featured frightening or ironic plot twists. What were some of the show's most celebrated episodes? More...
KSPavan
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This Day in History
The Twilight Zone Premieres on CBS (1959)
A classic science-fiction show that ran for just five years, The Twilight Zone was created by veteran television writer Rod Serling. More than half of its 155 unrelated episodes were written or co-written by Serling, who also narrated each half-hour episode with his trademark deadpan. The show often starred soon-to-be-famous actors such as William Shatner and Robert Redford. Many episodes featured frightening or ironic plot twists.
monamagda
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"The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street"

Season 1 Episode 22

The Twilight Zone's quintessential episode depicts a shadowy "monster," a cloud of suspicion, falling upon a neighborhood of friends. As if The Thing looked like The Andy Griffith Show, the possibility of an alien attack spurs residents to point fingers, place blame, and attack each other -- a moral object lesson that plays as freshly today as it did during its post-McCarthy Era debut. The "twist" that aliens have been lazily tinkering with the lights and cars, and that they’ve concluded that the easiest way to destroy mankind is to let us destroy ourselves, isn’t so much shocking as it is depressingly familiar. Enjoy the rest of the election season!

https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/best-twilight-zone-episodes-guide

raghd muhi al-deen
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The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series)
The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series)
The Twilight Zone
TheTwilightZoneLogo.png
Original 1959 title card
Genre Science fiction
Fantasy
Format Anthology series
Created by Rod Serling
Presented by Rod Serling
Composer(s) Bernard Herrmann (also season 1 theme)
Marius Constant (theme from episode 30 onwards, uncredited)
Jerry Goldsmith
Fred Steiner
Leith Stevens
Leonard Rosenman
Franz Waxman et al.
Country of origin United States
No. of seasons 5
No. of episodes 156 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Rod Serling
Producer(s) Buck Houghton (1959–62)
Herbert Hirschman (1963)
Bert Granet (1963–64)
William Froug (1963–64)
Cinematography George T. Clemens
Running time 25 min. (seasons 1–3, 5)
51 min. (season 4)
Production company(s) Cayuga Productions
CBS Productions
Distributor CBS Television Distribution
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Audio format Mono
Original run October 2, 1959 – June 19, 1964
Chronology
Followed by The Twilight Zone (1985 TV series)

The Twilight Zone is an American science-fiction[1]/fantasy[2] anthology television series created by Rod Serling, which ran for five seasons on CBS from 1959 to 1964. The series consists of unrelated stories depicting paranormal, futuristic, kafkaesque, or otherwise disturbing or unusual events; each story typically features some sort of plot twist and a moral.

The series is notable for featuring both established stars (Joan Blondell, Ann Blyth, Buster Keaton, Burgess Meredith, Ed Wynn) and younger actors who would become more famous later on (Veronica Cartwright, Bill Bixby, William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Robert Duvall, Mariette Hartley, Burt Reynolds, Dennis Hopper, Robert Redford). Rod Serling served as executive producer and head writer; he wrote or co-wrote 92 of the show's 156 episodes. He was also the show's host and narrator, delivering monologues at the beginning and end of each episode. Serling's opening and closing narrations usually summarize the episode's events encapsulating how and why the main character(s) had entered the Twilight Zone. The Twilight Zone itself is not presented as being a tangible plane, but a metaphor for the strange circumstances befalling the protagonists.[citation needed]

In 1997, the episodes "To Serve Man" and "It's a Good Life" were respectively ranked at 11 and 31 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time;[3] Serling himself stated that his favorite episodes of the series were "The Invaders" and "Time Enough at Last".[4] In 2002, The Twilight Zone was ranked No. 26 on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.[5] In 2013, the Writers Guild of America ranked it as the third best written TV series ever.[6]
Development

By the late 1950s, Rod Serling was a regular name in television. His successful teleplays included Patterns (for Kraft Television Theater) and Requiem for a Heavyweight (for Playhouse 90), but constant changes and edits made by the networks and sponsors frustrated Serling. In Requiem for a Heavyweight, the line "Got a match?" had to be struck because the sponsor sold lighters; other programs had similar striking of words that might remind viewers of competitors to the sponsor, including one case in which the sponsor, Ford Motor Company, had the Chrysler Building removed from a picture of the New York City skyline.[7]

But according to comments in his 1957 anthology Patterns, Serling had been trying to delve into material more controversial than his works of the early 1950s. This led to Noon on Doomsday for the United States Steel Hour in 1956, a commentary by Serling on the total lack of repentance and defensiveness he saw in the Mississippi town where the murder of Emmett Till took place. His original script closely paralleled the Till case, then was moved out of the South and the victim changed to a Jewish pawnbroker, and eventually watered down to just a foreigner in an unnamed town. Despite bad reviews, activists sent a large number of letters and wires protesting the production.[8][9]

Serling thought that a science-fictional setting, with robots, aliens and other supernatural occurrences, would give him more freedom and less interference in expressing controversial ideas than more realistic settings.[10] "The Time Element" was Serling's 1957 pilot pitch for his show, a time travel adventure about a man who travels back to Honolulu in 1941 and unsuccessfully tries to warn everyone about the impending attack on Pearl Harbor. The script, however, was rejected and shelved for a year until Bert Granet discovered and produced it as an episode of Desilu Playhouse in 1958.[11] The show was a huge success and enabled Serling to finally begin production on his anthology series, The Twilight Zone.
Overview of seasons
Season 1 (1959–1960)

There is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the Twilight Zone.
—Rod Serling

Serling working on his script with a dictating machine, 1959

The Twilight Zone premiered the night of October 2, 1959 to rave reviews. "...Twilight Zone is about the only show on the air that I actually look forward to seeing. It's the one series that I will let interfere with other plans", said Terry Turner for the Chicago Daily News. Others agreed. Daily Variety ranked it with "the best that has ever been accomplished in half-hour filmed television" and the New York Herald Tribune found the show to be "certainly the best and most original anthology series of the year."

Even as the show proved popular to television's critics, it struggled to find a receptive audience of television viewers. CBS was banking on a rating of at least 21 or 22, but its initial numbers were much worse. The series' future was jeopardized when its third episode, "Mr. Denton on Doomsday" earned a 16.3 rating. The show attracted a large enough audience to survive a brief hiatus in November, during which it finally surpassed its competition on ABC and NBC and convinced its sponsors (General Foods and Kimberly-Clark) to stay on until the end of the season.

With one exception ("The Chaser"), the first season featured only scripts written by Rod Serling, Charles Beaumont and Richard Matheson, a team that was eventually responsible for 127 of the show's 156 episodes. Additionally, with one exception ("A World of His Own"), Serling never appeared on camera except to announce the next episode, instead doing voice-over narrations. Many of the season's episodes proved to be among the series' most celebrated, including "Time Enough at Last", "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street", "Walking Distance" and "The After Hours". The first season won Serling an unprecedented fourth Emmy for dramatic writing, a Producers Guild Award for Serling's creative partner Buck Houghton and the Hugo Award for best dramatic presentation.

Bernard Herrmann's original opening theme music lasted throughout the first season. For the final five episodes of the season, the show's original surrealist "pit and summit" opening montage and narration was replaced by a piece featuring a blinking eye and shorter narration, and a truncated version of Herrmann's theme.

Note: some first-season episodes have only been available for decades in a version with a pasted-on second-season opening. These "re-themed" episodes were prepared for airing in the summer of 1961 as summer repeats; the producers wanted to have a consistent opening for the show every week. During the origin

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