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Should "from" be replaced by "while"? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 8:59:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
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*Advice to seniors.*

A study in United States shows over 51% of old people fall down from climbing stairs. Every year, many Americans are killed by climbing stairs.

Should "from" be replaced by "while"?

Thanks.
thar
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 9:26:14 AM

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Yes, but you would have to change the whole sentence.

No, if you just change that word. It would change the meaning.

'While' during is the activity, while 'from' is as a result of.

0f falls that happen to old people, 51% are as a result of climbing stairs.
20% are due to tripping, 10% due to fainting,
etc


But,
If 51% of old people fall while climbing stairs....well, that is an awful lot of injured people!
If n elderly person walks up stairs, they have only a 50/50 chance of making it up safely!
You can see that is not what they mean. So you can't just swap it in.

'From' is 'as a result of'.


It is poorly written, but they did intend it to mean 'as a result of climbing stairs'.

You die from gunshot wounds or from a deadly disease.

They mean to say you fall from climbing stairs or from tripping over the cat.

But they put it really badly.
The injuries were from falling while climbing stairs - as you correctly state.
But you can't change it in their sentence without changing other words as well.

You can tell it is badly written because they say people are killed by climbing stairs.
Falling trees, maybe. But not climbing stairs. d'oh!
They die as a result of falls while climbing stairs, or from heart attacks brought on by the effort of climbing stairs.
But they are not killed by climbing stairs.

The meaning is clear enough put the writing is very ropey!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 9:42:48 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 2,984
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Thanks, thar.
Islami
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 9:49:32 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/21/2017
Posts: 28
Neurons: 142
Hello thar, how do you rate the following rephrased sentence?

In the United States, a study shows, over 51% of old people fall down from stairs. As a result, many of them lose their lives.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 2:10:01 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 13,565
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Thar - the picture that came into my mind of a group of old people, huddling together in fear while a climbing staircase stealthily approached, was a worthy contender to "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes".
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 3:14:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
Thar will reply again, I'm sure of it.
But, in the mean time, no, 51% of "old" people don't fall on the stairs. I would also like to mention that children "fall down", usually resulting in skinned knees. "Old" people, and others, simply fall. People also fall on the stairs.
whatson
Posted: Sunday, October 01, 2017 4:45:41 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/19/2016
Posts: 286
Neurons: 2,422
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Koh Elaine wrote:


1. A study in United States shows over 51% of old people fall down from climbing stairs.
2. Every year, many Americans are killed by climbing stairs.



Let's think outside of the toolbox.

Let's change "climbing stairs" to LADDERS.
Then "people FALL DOWN FROM LADDERS (and hit the ground. They don't necessarily die.)

The "many Americans" of Sentence 2 aren't the same group as in Sentence 1.
They are KILLED BY LADDERS. (They don't have climb up and fall down first,
ladder may tip over, on top of them and kill them.)

A horse, a horse, a hoarse horse!
whatson
Posted: Monday, October 02, 2017 8:06:48 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/19/2016
Posts: 286
Neurons: 2,422
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
*
My initial investigation makes me believe I'm on the right track:

According to an online Eng.-Malay dictionary

both STAIRS and LADDER are TANGGA.

They have to be differentiated. How? On moveable TANGGA you ascend

like on a palm tree, hold on to it with both hands.

Found expression CLIMBING STAIRS = MENAIKI TANGGA

and CLIMB = MEMANJAT. Are these different forms of the same verb?

The mysteries of that part of East (Far?) will be soon revealed.




A horse, a horse, a hoarse horse!
tunaafi
Posted: Monday, October 02, 2017 8:21:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
Islami wrote:
In the United States, a study shows, over 51% of old people fall down from stairs. As a result, many of them lose their lives.

They don't fall down from stairs.

The main point is that the study did not show this. As thar put it: 0f falls that happen to old people, 51% are as a result of climbing stairs.
TMe
Posted: Monday, October 02, 2017 10:18:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 496
Neurons: 3,149
The poster is concerned with the construction of the sentence. The study showed this or not is a different point.

I am a layman.
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