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ahmetwrt
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 7:13:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2011
Posts: 124
Neurons: 425
You and he've got ...

Odd to the ears but teachnically correct -or it seems correct to me.
Has anybody ever seen, read or used such a sentence?

Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 7:42:02 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/10/2009
Posts: 1,647
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You and he've got ...


I am most certainly the last person to attempt this one but, it does sound wrong.

Should it be: You and he have received?
kitten
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 7:42:23 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/28/2009
Posts: 2,463
Neurons: 7,420
Location: the city by the bay
Grammar is not my strong suit but I do not think the above is correct.

Never heard it or read it.Think

I cringe when I hear >>>>> He's got = he has got >>> rather thank he has. The "got" doesn't belong.

But as always there are those who know more than myself who will come along to help you.


peace out, >^,,^<
Ava
Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 1:13:00 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/17/2011
Posts: 46
Neurons: 157
This, from Swan:

In conversation and informal writing, we often use the double form 'have got.'
I've got a new boyfriend. (More natural in speech than I have a new boyfriend.)
Has your sister got a new car? I haven't got your keys.
Note that 'have got' means exactly the same as 'have' in this case - it is a present tense of 'have,' not the present perfect of 'get.'

Got is not generally used with infinitives, participles or -ing forms of have: you cannot usually say 'to have got a headache' or 'having got a brother.' The infinitive of 'have got' is occasionally used after modal verbs (e.g. 'She must have got a new boyfriend.')

"Got'-forms of 'have' are less common in the past tense.
I 'had' the flu last week.
'Did' you 'have' good teachers when you were at school?

'Have got' is rather less common in American English, especially in questions and negatives.

In very informal American speech, people may drop 've (but not 's) before got.
I('ve) got a problem.*

*Dropping the 've would be a big problem where I come from.

I use 'have got.'
We do become accustomed to the familiar sounds of our own subculture's language.
HAVEGOTHAVEGOTHAVEGOTHAVEGOTHAVEGOTHAVEGOT
Hope this helps. :P
songbird6
Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 7:30:32 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/29/2010
Posts: 142
Neurons: 265
Location: United States
Suggest "You and he have a car. Drop "got".
boneyfriend
Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 7:52:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2009
Posts: 2,625
Neurons: 10,546
Location: Columbia, South Carolina, United States
In America, we use "have gotten."
Fernellys
Posted: Tuesday, July 26, 2011 8:56:56 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/26/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: Dominican Republic
Hello All

For it to be a sentence it must have a complete thought.

so i would suggest saying depending on the context of course:

Both of you have gotten the same chances to try this out and both of you have failed.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 1:13:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
OK - just to give the BE perspective...."got" as a possessive is regarded as bad grammar: the use of "Gotten" is regarded by many as an abomination and prompts irate Letters to the Editor regularly!

This is just another of those Early Modern English words (like 'Fall' for Autumn)that long ago fell out of use in BE so one could understand it being regarded as old-fashioned - but why it became 'bad' grammar when English Grammar became proscriptive is a bit odd. Perhaps people were brooding on all that lovely tea that got thrown into the Harbour and feeling a bit anti at the time?
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, July 28, 2011 11:32:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
ahmetwrt wrote:
You and he've got ...

Odd to the ears but teachnically correct -or it seems correct to me.
Has anybody ever seen, read or used such a sentence?

Informally
There is no such contraction as "he've".
You've got ("you" is plural) is used, but only informally. This is very common in AE daily speech, but it is not considered good English.

Properly
"Got" as a verb with an object is the act of receiving, coming into possession of, obtaining, or even becoming. It is not the act of having/holding/being in possession of.
You and he got the car last week. The two of you took possession of the car last week; you picked it up from the dealer last week.

I got sick last week.
I got the title to the car yesterday.
I arrived early, so I got a good seat.
(I nabbed, took, sat-in a good seat.)

To be in possession of something is "have"
You and he have title to the car. This would more commonly be said "You have title to the car (together)", or "You both (own the car)/(are on the title of the car)".

I have a cold.
I have the title to the car.
I have a good seat, because I arrived early.
(I am sitting in, have possession of a good seat.)
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