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Why are women...so much more interesting to men than men are to women? Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Why are women...so much more interesting to men than men are to women?

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
Mehrdad77
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 1:45:15 AM

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Language is wine upon the lips.






Virginia Woolf
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 2:26:57 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Why are women...so much more interesting to men than men are to women?

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 2:26:58 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Why are women...so much more interesting to men than men are to women?

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
javedmq
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 5:31:23 AM
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Because men are more economically independent and physically strong enough to protect women.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 6:04:14 AM

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Maybe she asked such naive questions merely because she was not interested in men herself? They say she was lesbian.
jezebelisgone
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 7:52:45 AM

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I a new to this community and am not quite sure if this topic was created to rewrite and post the quote of the day, because you enjoyed it or really took to it. Or if the quote has now actually turned into someone's question or topic and they want to discuss it. For the sake of clarity, I'm going to go with the latter.

I personally believe women care just as much about men, as men do about women. I believe women have been taught or convinced to be hunted. Just as men instinctively hunt. Its innate. At the same times change.

jezebelisgone
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 8:54:29 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Why are women...so much more interesting to men than men are to women?

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


Ask a woman. They know best.

I remember, therefore I am.
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 9:06:40 AM

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Context from: A room of one’s own, by Virginia Woolf

Two

Women do not write books about men—a fact that I could not help welcoming with relief, for if I had first to read all that men have written about women, then all that women have written about men, the aloe that flowers once in a hundred years would flower twice before I could set pen to paper. So, making a perfectly arbitrary choice of a dozen volumes or so, I sent my slips of paper to lie in the wire tray, and waited in my stall, among the other seekers for the essential oil of truth.

What could be the reason, then, of this curious disparity, I wondered, drawing cart-wheels on the slips of paper provided by the British taxpayer for other purposes. Why are women, judging from this catalogue, so much more interesting to men than men are to women? A very curious fact it seemed, and my mind wandered to picture the lives of men who spend their time in writing books about women; whether they were old or young, married or unmarried, red-nosed or hump-backed—anyhow, it was flattering, vaguely, to feel oneself the object of such attention provided that it was not entirely bestowed by the crippled and the infirm—so I pondered until all such frivolous thoughts were ended by an avalanche of books sliding down on to the desk in front of me. Now the trouble began. The student who has been trained in research at Oxbridge has no doubt some method of shepherding his question past all distractions till it runs into his answer as a sheep runs into its pen. The student by my side, for Instance, who was copying assiduously from a scientific manual, was, I felt sure, extracting pure nuggets of the essential ore every ten minutes or so. His little grunts of satisfaction indicated so much. But if, unfortunately, one has had no training in a university, the question far from being shepherded to its pen flies like a frightened flock hither and thither, helter-skelter, pursued by a whole pack of hounds. Professors, schoolmasters, sociologists, clergymen, novelists, essayists, journalists, men who had no qualification save that they were not women, chased my simple and single question—Why are some women poor?—until it became fifty questions; until the fifty questions leapt frantically into midstream and were carried away. Every page in my notebook was scribbled over with notes. To show the state of mind I was in, I will read you a few of them, explaining that the page was headed quite simply, Women and Poverty, in block letters; but what followed was something like this:


Read more:https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/w/woolf/virginia/w91r/chapter2.html

raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 9:23:42 AM

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Virginia Woolf
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Virginia Woolf: Sylvia Plath, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf
Woolf, Virginia (Stephen), 1882–1941, English novelist and essayist; daughter of Sir Leslie Stephen

. A successful innovator in the form of the novel, she is considered a significant force in 20th-century fiction. She was educated at home from the resources of her father's huge library. In 1912 she married Leonard Woolf, a critic and writer on economics, with whom she set up the Hogarth Press in 1917. Their home became a gathering place for a circle of artists, critics, and writers known as the Bloomsbury group

. As a novelist Woolf's primary concern was to represent the flow of ordinary experience. Her emphasis was not on plot or characterization but on a character's consciousness, his thoughts and feelings, which she brilliantly illuminated by the stream of consciousness

technique. She did not limit herself to one consciousness, however, but slipped from mind to mind, particularly in The Waves, probably her most experimental novel. Her prose style is poetic, heavily symbolic, and filled with superb visual images.

Woolf's early works, The Voyage Out (1915) and Night and Day (1919), were traditional in method, but she became increasingly innovative in Jacob's Room (1922), Mrs. Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), and The Waves (1931). Other experimental novels are Orlando (1928), The Years (1937), and Between the Acts (1941). She was a master of the critical essay, and some of her finest pieces are included in The Common Reader (1925), The Second Common Reader (1933), The Death of the Moth and Other Essays (1942), and The Moment and Other Essays (1948). A Room of One's Own (1929) and Three Guineas (1938) are feminist tracts. Her biography of Roger Fry

(1940) is a careful study of a friend. Some of her short stories from Monday or Tuesday (1921) appear with others in A Haunted House (1944). Virginia Woolf suffered mental breakdowns in 1895 and 1915; she drowned herself in 1941 because she feared another breakdown from which she might not recover. Most of her posthumously published works were edited by her husband.
Bibliography

See her Writer's Diary, ed. by L. Woolf (1953) and Correspondence with Lytton Strachey, ed. by L. Woolf and J. Strachey (1956); diary, ed. by A. O. Bell (4 vol., 1979–83); letters, ed. by N. Nicolson and J. Trautmann (6 vol., 1977–82); essays, ed. by A. McNeillie and S. N. Clarke (6 vol., 1989–2000); biographies by Q. Bell (2 vol., 1972), P. Rose (1978), L. Gordon (1985), M. Rosenthal (1987), J. King (1995), P. Reid (1996), H. Lee (1997), N. Nicolson (2000), and J. Briggs (2005); studies by E. M. Forster (1942), J. Bennett (2d ed. 1964), R. Freedman (1980), and J. Marcus, ed. (1983). See also the autobiography of her husband, Leonard Sidney Woolf (5 vol., 1960–69).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.
Woolf, Virginia

Born Jan. 25, 1882, in London; died Mar. 28, 1941, in Lewes, Sussex. English modernist writer and critic.

As an experimental novelist, Woolf limited her task to the portrayal of feelings and sensations, which she interpreted as the true reality (Jacob’s Room, 1922; Mrs. Dalloway, 1925; and To the Lighthouse, 1927, for example). Woolf considered emphasis on social reality to be a violation of the laws of art and the realistic method outmoded (the articles “Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown,” 1924, and “Contemporary Artistic Literature,” 1925). Formalist features became stronger in her novels of the 1930’s (The Waves, 1931, and The Years, 1937).
WORKS
Collected Essays, vols. 1-4. London, 1966-67.
REFERENCES
Zhantieva, D. G. Angliiskii roman XX veka: 1918-1939. Moscow, 1965.
Mikhal’skaia, N. P. Puti razvitiia angliiskogo romana 1920-1930-x godov. Moscow, 1966.
Ivasheva, V. V. Angliiskaia literatura: XX vek. Moscow, 1967.
Allen, W. Traditsiia i mechta. Moscow, 1970.

N. P. MIKHAL’SKAIA
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.


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with my pleasure
Gary98
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 10:42:00 AM

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Because women are the fairer sex, and men are pigs: we eat up whatever that is in the trough. No offense to men.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 11:22:10 AM

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jezebelisgone wrote:
I a new to this community and am not quite sure if this topic was created to rewrite and post the quote of the day, because you enjoyed it or really took to it. Or if the quote has now actually turned into someone's question or topic and they want to discuss it. For the sake of clarity, I'm going to go with the latter.

I can understand why you are not sure.

It is a topic for discussion, and your views are very welcome. Dancing

I don't know why some members insist on simply copying the original post - and some copy other people's posts without writing any of their own opinions. d'oh!

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
AndySon
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 12:08:42 PM
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That is a very interesting question... I was wondering myself why it works this way. And, perhaps, things were working this way even in the old times, as it is proved here by this writer. My thoughts are that, perhaps, only a woman herself is able to come up with an answer to this mind-torturing question.
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 12:52:51 PM

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Daemon wrote:
Why are women...so much more interesting to men than men are to women?

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)



Upon reflection I think it is simply the case that women are good at pretending not to be interested in men. They have become so good at it they start to believe it themselves, even while they spend hours preening themselves!

I remember, therefore I am.
David_2017
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 1:22:51 PM

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I'm sure there are many reasons given her complex background...

One reason that I have acquired overtime is that, naturally, women -- and men -- conformed to the social norms of the time. A man was expected to approach the woman when interested in, say, to arrange an outing that deemed rather intimate or even romantic, such as a modern date. The initial offering by a man is seen in many activities of that time, such as engagement. Its origins are numerous but most notably, as I'm sure you can guess, the Bible. This gave women a lot less power to act upon their interest in a man; they can merely approve or disapprove but not offer such social activities. They may gossip, speak privately about the flirtation, but not really express their interest in a man in anything too weighted externally, such as poetry or writing... Hence the quote suggesting that women are interested in men, just less so relative to men in women. That might be why... Due to these limitations, it is obvious that men are greatly seen as more interested in women! They had to fear disapproval, be certain she is the one (especially if they're Catholic haha) and become a real man by becoming financially able to satisfy the women and her future children. This is the 19th century. There was still intense discrimination against women in the labour market despite industrialisation, and women fantasised about the same old stories of romance from books and family pressure. I can't go any further because I've got things to do. But for any youngsters out there, you have to take into account all these factors and understand the quote given in its context and especially time. Women should be equally as interested in men as men in women -- or men to women and vice versa -- whether sexually or other. If not then, definitely today as they have a more equal footing and right in any relationship. At least in our society anyhow.
Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 1:43:30 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Why are women...so much more interesting to men than men are to women?

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)


Yeah. At least somebody is interested in someone else...
medina69
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 2:30:22 PM
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Not talking And who is she anyways??
Why are we having this stupid comment as quote of the day??
Is very obvious that no man will pay attention to her, she looks horrible and very much lesbian!
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 5:05:35 PM

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medina69 wrote:
Not talking And who is she anyways??
Why are we having this stupid comment as quote of the day??
Is very obvious that no man will pay attention to her, she looks horrible and very much lesbian!


Well, Medina, you should read the comments on this topic before submitting inappropriate, irrelevant and wholly inaccurate remarks. I can't say welcome to the Forum this time, but maybe next time you post having reflected on your unhelpful attitude .

I remember, therefore I am.
Clark Thomas
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 11:27:52 PM

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Men think more of women, than women think of men – because women think with one head, and men with two.
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 3:04:35 PM

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Clark Thomas wrote:
Men think more of women, than women think of men – because women think with one head, and men with two.


How come?

I remember, therefore I am.
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