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Marshall Islands Lutok Kobban Alele Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Marshall Islands Lutok Kobban Alele

The inhabitants of the Marshall Islands have long kept a tradition centered on the alele, a soft-sided basket handmade from the native pandanus plant. "Lutok Kobban Alele" is a weeklong festival that honors the basket as a national symbol and celebrates Marshallese culture in general, concluding with an official ceremony on Manit Day, a public holiday observed on the last Friday of September. Activities take place in the capital city of Majuro and include performances by Marshallese singers and dancers, feasts, traditional storytelling, and demonstrations of basket weaving and cooking. More...
monamagda
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 8:03:55 AM

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Pour out the basket. Pour all the treasures of the family out that all may see and celebrate. Lutok Kobban Alele is a very special celebration here in the Marshall Islands.

An Alele is, quite literally, a basket of valuables. Traditionally, the Alele would be a hand-woven basket made from the pandanus leaves that grow so easily on the islands. Inside, a family would place their most valued possessions: those things that represented their heritage, status, and place in the world. This precious basket was then safeguarded by the matriarch of each family for safekeeping, and passed along from generation to generation, grandmother to granddaughter.

Following the end of American occupation in 1986, the festival of Lutok Kobban Alele (translated roughly into Pour out the valuable contents of the basket) was started as a way of remembering, reviving, and celebrating Marshallese culture throughout the Marshall Islands. The alele became somewhat of a symbol of national identity and pride, and a focal point for the continuation of Marshallese culture despite centuries of occupation.

Manit is an interesting concept. Roughly translated, the word Manit refers to custom, or tradition. Yet the idea of manit is far more complex than that. Tradition and culture in the Marshall Islands is far more than woven baskets, striking outrigger canoes and every imaginable form of coconut product. Culture here is intricately bound in social status, clan identity, land holdings, and the oral traditions passed down in secret from elders to their grandchildren. Perhaps most interesting to me, is the connection between culture and land. A very complex system of matrilineal heritage determines one’s place in society, their clan, and the land they can work or claim. This kind of identity is also entirely wrapped up in the idea of the alele – that simple, small basket that holds all that is dear to a family. Thus, the Manit day celebrations become a celebration not only of cultural artifacts and practices, but a true celebration of identity and heritage here on the islands.

https://jakeshimkustravel.wordpress.com/2015/09/21/lutok-kobban-alele-and-manit-day/
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 9:22:06 AM

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Marshall Islands Lutok Kobban Alele
Marshall Islands Lutok Kobban Alele
Last week of September
The inhabitants of Micronesia's Marshall Islands have long kept a tradition centered on the alele, a soft-sided basket handmade from the native pandanus plant. This treasured item contains a family's most valuable possessions, and according to Marshallese custom, passes through generations in the trust of the family's eldest female.
The phrase "Lutok Kobban Alele" means pour out the valuable contents of the basket. The event of the same name is a weeklong festival that honors the basket as a national symbol and celebrates Marshallese culture in general. The inaugural festival was held in 1986, the year that the Marshall Islands ended a long era under U.S. administration. In years past, the festival has been sponsored by the Marshall Islands Alele Museum.
Festivities conclude with an official ceremony on Manit Day, a public holiday observed on the last Friday of September. Activities take place in the capital city of Marjuro and include performances by Marshallese singers and dancers, feasts promoting local foods, traditional storytelling, and demonstrations of basket weaving and cooking.
CONTACTS:
Alele Museum
P.O. Box 629
Majuro, MH 96960 Marshall Islands
members.tripod.com/~alelemuseum/Index.html
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.


with my pleasure
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