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Ötzi the Iceman Is Discovered by German Tourists (1991) Options
Daemon
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Ötzi the Iceman Is Discovered by German Tourists (1991)

In 1991, two hikers discovered a well-preserved corpse trapped in ice near the border between Austria and Italy. It proved to be that of a man who lived about 5,300 years ago—making it the oldest natural mummy ever found. He was nicknamed Ötzi, for the Ötztal Alps where he was found. Also recovered were clothes, shoes, tools, weapons, fire-starting materials, and medicine. Scientists have since determined that Ötzi ate about eight hours before his death. What did he eat, and how did he die? More...
KSPavan
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Ötzi the Iceman Is Discovered by German Tourists (1991)
In 1991, two hikers discovered a well-preserved corpse trapped in ice near the border between Austria and Italy. It proved to be that of a man who lived about 5,300 years ago—making it the oldest natural mummy ever found. He was nicknamed Ötzi, for the Ötztal Alps where he was found. Also recovered were clothes, shoes, tools, weapons, fire-starting materials, and medicine. Scientists have since determined that Ötzi ate about eight hours before his death.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 4:44:42 AM

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Lifestyle
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Lifestyle may refer to:

Lifestyle (sociology), the way a person lives
Otium, ancient Roman concept of a lifestyle

Television

Lifestyle (Philippine TV channel), a Philippine lifestyle and entertainment cable channel owned by ABS-CBN
LifeStyle, an Australian subscription television station
Lifestyle (UK TV channel), a defunct British television station
Lifestyle (GR series), a weekly entertainment news show that is broadcast on Alter Channel
The Lifestyle, a documentary about swingers

Music

Lifestyle (album), a 2000 album by the band Silkworm
"Lifestyle" (song), a 2014 song by Rich Gang

See also

Lifestyle center, a shopping center or mixed-used commercial development that combines the traditional retail functions of a shopping mall with leisure amenities
Lifestyle business a business that is set up and run with the aim of sustaining a particular level of income
LifeStyles Condoms, a company
Lifestyle management, companies that manage lifestyle
Way of life (disambiguation)

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with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 9:31:27 AM

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Some believe, this mummified body is cursed, or, more precisely, can cause the death of those who mishandles or disrespects it.
raghd muhi al-deen
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Ötzi the Iceman
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Ötzi the Iceman
Ötzi
Ötzi the Iceman on a sheet covered autopsy table
Born c. 3300 BC
near the present village of Feldthurns (Velturno), north of Bolzano, Italy
Died c. 3255 BC (aged about 45)
Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch on the border between Austria and Italy
Cause of death Exsanguination due to arrow wound on his shoulder[1]
Other names Similaun Man; "Frozen Fritz" (by British tabloids)/Otzi
Known for Oldest natural mummy of a Chalcolithic (Copper Age) European man
Height 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in)
Weight 50 kg (110 lb; 7.9 st)
Website
South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology

Ötzi (pronounced [ˈœtsi] ( ), also called Ötzi the Iceman, the Similaun Man, the Man from Hauslabjoch, Homo tyrolensis, and the Hauslabjoch mummy) is a well-preserved natural mummy of a man who lived about 3,300 BC.[2][3] The mummy was found in September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, hence Ötzi, near the Similaun mountain and Hauslabjoch on the border between Austria and Italy.[4] He is Europe's oldest natural human mummy, and has offered an unprecedented view of Chalcolithic Europeans. His body and belongings are displayed in the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, South Tyrol, Italy.
Discovery
Ötzi the Iceman half uncovered, face down in a pool of water with iced banks
Ötzi the Iceman while still frozen in the glacier, photographed by Helmut Simon upon the discovery of the body in September 1991

On 19 September 1991, Ötzi was found by two German tourists from Nuremberg, Helmut and Erika Simon, at 3,210 metres (10,530 ft) on the east ridge of the Fineilspitze in the Ötztal Alps on the Austrian–Italian border, while walking off the path between the mountain passes Hauslabjoch and Tisenjoch. They believed that the body was of a recently deceased mountaineer.[5] The next day, a mountain gendarme and the keeper of the nearby Similaunhütte first attempted to remove the body, which was frozen in ice below the torso, using a pneumatic drill and ice-axes, but had to give up due to bad weather. The next day, eight groups visited the site, amongst whom happened to be the famous mountaineers Hans Kammerlander and Reinhold Messner. The body was semi-officially extracted on 22 September and officially salvaged the following day. It was transported to the University of Innsbruck, where it was recognized to be primeval the same day.[6]

At the Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (1919), the border of Austria and Italy was defined as the watershed of the rivers Inn and Etsch, and Ötzi's find site drains to the Austrian side. However, the border veers slightly away from the watershed, and surveys in October 1991 showed that the body had been located 92.56 metres (101 yd) inside Italian territory.[7] The province of South Tyrol therefore claimed property rights, but agreed to let Innsbruck University finish their scientific examinations. Since 1998 it has been on display at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, the capital of South Tyrol.
Scientific analyses

The corpse has been extensively examined, measured, X-rayed, and dated. Tissues and intestinal contents have been examined microscopically, as have the items found with the body. In August 2004, frozen bodies of three Austro-Hungarian soldiers killed during the Battle of San Matteo (1918) were found on the mountain Punta San Matteo in Trentino. One body was sent to a museum in the hope that research on how the environment affected its preservation would help unravel both Ötzi's past, and future evolution of humans.[8]
Body

By current estimates, at the time of his death Ötzi was approximately 1.65 metres (5 ft 5 in) tall,[9] weighed about 50 kilograms (110 lb; 7.9 st)[10] and was about 45 years of age.[9] When his body was found, it weighed 13.750 kg.[11] Because the body was covered in ice shortly after his death, it had only partially deteriorated. Analysis of pollen, dust grains and the isotopic composition of his tooth enamel indicates that he spent his childhood near the present village of Feldthurns, north of Bolzano, but later went to live in valleys about 50 kilometres further north.[12] His lungs were blackened, probably from breathing the smoke of campfires.[citation needed] Analysis by Franco Rollo's group at the University of Camerino has shown that Ötzi's mitochondrial DNA belongs to the K1 subcluster of the mitochondrial haplogroup K, but that it cannot be categorized into any of the three modern branches of that subcluster.[13] Rollo's group published Ötzi's complete mtDNA sequence in 2008.[14]
The Iceman from the chest up lying on stainless steel table, with his left arm across his body just between the top of his right shoulder and under his chin
Ötzi the Iceman, now housed at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, Italy

Analysis of Ötzi's intestinal contents showed two meals (the last one consumed about eight hours before his death), one of chamois meat, the other of red deer and herb bread. Both were eaten with grain as well as roots and fruits. The grain from both meals was a highly processed einkorn wheat bran,[15] quite possibly eaten in the form of bread. In the proximity of the body, and thus possibly originating from the Iceman's provisions, chaff and grains of einkorn and barley, and seeds of flax and poppy were discovered, as well as kernels of sloes (small plumlike fruits of the blackthorn tree) and various seeds of berries growing in the wild.[16] Hair analysis was used to examine his diet from several months before.

Pollen in the first meal showed that it had been consumed in a mid-altitude conifer forest, and other pollens indicated the presence of wheat and legumes, which may have been domesticated crops. Pollen grains of hop-hornbeam were also discovered. The pollen was very well preserved, with the cells inside remaining intact, indicating that it had been fresh (a few hours old) at the time of Ötzi's death, which places the event in the spring. Einkorn wheat is harvested in the late summer, and sloes in the autumn; these must have been stored from the previous year.

In 2009, a CAT scan revealed that the stomach had shifted upward to where his lower lung area would normally be. Analysis of the contents revealed the partly digested remains of ibex meat, confirmed by DNA analysis, suggesting he had a meal less than two hours before his death. Wheat grains were also found.[17]

High levels of both copper particles and arsenic were found in Ötzi's hair. This, along with Ötzi's copper axe which is 99.7% pure copper, has led scientists to speculate that Ötzi was involved in copper smelting.[18]

By examining the proportions of Ötzi's tibia, femur and pelvis, Christopher Ruff has determined that Ötzi's lifestyle included long walks over hilly terrain. This degree of mobility is not characteristic of other Copper Age Europeans. Ruff proposes that this may indicate that Ötzi was a high-altitude shepherd.[19]

Using modern 3-D technology, a facial reconstruction has been created for the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, Italy. It shows Ötzi looking old for his 45 years, with deep-set brown eyes, a beard, a furrowed face, and sunken cheeks. He is depicted looking tired and ungroomed.[20]
Health

Ötzi apparently had whipworm (Trichuris trichiura), an intestinal parasite. During CT scans, it was observed that three or four of his right ribs had been cracked when he had been lying face down after death, or where the ice had crushed his body. One of his fingernails (of the two found) shows three Beau's lines indicating he was sick three times in the six months before he died. The last incident, two months before he died, lasted about two weeks.[21] Also, it was found that his epidermis, the outer skin layer, was missing, a natural process from his mummification in ice.[10] Ötzi's teeth showed considerable internal deterioration from cavities. These oral pathologies may have been brought about by his grain-heavy, high carbohydrate diet.[22] DNA analysis in February 2012 revealed that Ötzi was lactose intolerant, supporting the theory that lactose intolerance was still common at that time, despite the increasing spread of agriculture and dairying.[23]
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