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srirr
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 1:48:35 AM

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Is there any word like arrivee? Or was there?

I was watching an Indian movie last night that dates to 1960's. It had scenes shot in Paris and Switzerland. In one of the scenes at some International airport, I could notice a board with the term "ARRIVEE".

Was there any term like arrivee in use earlier which has become archaic?
thar
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 1:58:37 AM

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it is not archaic in French ( Paris and Switzerland is the clue!)

arrivee = arrival

srirr
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 2:09:43 AM

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Thats correct Thar. Thanks. I however recall that it was not "é" but "e", or perhaps I missed to notice that carefully. :?
thar
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 2:17:00 AM

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Well, not to insult 1960's set designers, but if money was tight it might not have been filmed on location, and maybe the sign was made by a set painter not au fait with French? More likely you just missed it!
Arfax
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 4:13:32 AM
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Location: France
Accents (as in é, è...) are sometimes omitted when CAPITAL LETTERS are used.
So, the word "arrivée" would be spellt ARRIVEE instead of ARRIVÉE.

It is very common now because accented capitals (É, È, Ê, Ë, É, À, Â, Î, Ù...) are not featured on usual French keyboards, and many people do not take the trouble to check for the code or for a virtual keyboard.

Smarter keyboards exist, such as BÉPO ; BÉPO is supposed to be ergonomic, with the most frequent letters easier to reach.

Edit : next post makes a point : the old typing-machines keyboards did not have accented capitals either, so people lost the habit long before computers appeared... With computers, you can find them if you make an effort ; with typing machines there was probably no solution save manual editing ?
srirr
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 4:18:23 AM

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I concur Arfax, but I saw this in a movie of 1960's when computers were not used in designing or film editing.
Omission of accent while capitalization is something that makes sense.

Thanks for the info.

thar
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 4:46:40 AM

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Wow, I did not know the accents were ever omitted. I thought of that as a cause and then dismissed it, because I know the French are very careful of their language, and I thought a letter without the accent would look as naked and odd as a misspelling! In Ísland we write the accents from the codes if necessary. The things you can learn from old cinema!
Wordscrafter
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 5:29:24 AM
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Joined: 7/2/2011
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Location: Paris, Ile-de-France, France
I confirm that when capital letters are used, in french, accents may be omitted - practical keyboard reasons, and may be others which I dont' know. Giving theses sounds properly are rather important in french. You get used to it by practicing.

One-in-3 additional info:
1/ "é" should be pronounced with an intention to give a kind of "closed" sound, like the spanish say "Pedro". It is caracteristic of the french south accent (Marseille, Cannes, Toulouse, Perpignan, etc.). Down there they'd tell you "Vé!" instead of "Vois!" (regarde! or Look!).
2/ "è", on the contrary, means that you "open" the sound. Like in German, when one says "Die Berge" (Mountain).

3/ the verb "Arriver" also means to "manage to do something", "to make it". Ex: "Je suis enfin arrivé à le rencontrer", "I finally managed to meet him".
And, of course, to arrive: "Je suis arrivé de bonne heure", "I arrived early".

Enjoy! A bientôt!
antonio
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 6:19:35 AM
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Woohhh wohhhh woohhhh. I don't think that there's a word ARRIVEE. This is the first time I've heard this word and it doesn't sound right in the first place. Are this word referring to a person who just arrived?

trainee - OK!
arrivee - NAHHH!!
Wordscrafter
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 7:29:53 AM
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Location: Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Yes, in french, there is a word "arrivée" = arrival.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, July 25, 2011 9:53:33 AM

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So, when I drive my Citroën the tag under the hood tells it's CITROEN but the owner's manual has CITROËN printed on the cover page. Writing Citroen would be a misspelling ;-)

BTW, Finnish keyboards are capable to produce the accent marks easily, ¨^~´` (and there are tools like Character Map to get the more exotic letters). The letters Å å, Ä ä, and Ö ö are not accented, they are letters on their own.
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