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"Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick" (1901) Options
Daemon
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"Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick" (1901)

While speaking at the 1901 Minnesota State Fair, US Vice President Theodore Roosevelt used the proverb, "Speak softly and carry a big stick." Four days later, President McKinley was shot, and, after McKinley died on the 14th, Roosevelt became president. The statement he made in Minnesota became forever associated with his foreign policy of backing up negotiations with implicit military might, and political cartoons often portrayed him toting the proverbial stick. What is the rest of the saying? More...
KSPavan
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This Day in History
"Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick" (1901)
While speaking at the 1901 Minnesota State Fair, US Vice President Theodore Roosevelt used the proverb, "Speak softly and carry a big stick." Four days later, President McKinley was shot, and, after McKinley died on the 14th, Roosevelt became president. The statement he made in Minnesota became forever associated with his foreign policy of backing up negotiations with implicit military might, and political cartoons often portrayed him toting the proverbial stick.
Pieter_Hove
Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 7:02:21 AM

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"Speak softly and carry a big stick, and you will go far."
The big stick could stand for perseverance.
Threat and violence, as we all know, are the arms of the weak.
raghd muhi al-deen
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Theodore Roosevelt
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Theodore Roosevelt: Theodore Roosevelt National Park
For other people named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation).
Theodore Roosevelt
President Roosevelt - Pach Bros.tif
Theodore Roosevelt around 1904
26th President of the United States
In office
September 14, 1901 – March 4, 1909
Vice President None (1901–1905)
Charles W. Fairbanks
(1905–1909)
Preceded by William McKinley
Succeeded by William Howard Taft
25th Vice President of the United States
In office
March 4, 1901 – September 14, 1901
President William McKinley
Preceded by Garret Hobart
Succeeded by Charles W. Fairbanks
33rd Governor of New York
In office
January 1, 1899 – December 31, 1900
Lieutenant Timothy L. Woodruff
Preceded by Frank S. Black
Succeeded by Benjamin Barker Odell Jr.
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
In office
April 19, 1897 – May 10, 1898
President William McKinley
Preceded by William McAdoo
Succeeded by Charles Herbert Allen
President of the New York City Board of Police Commissioners
In office
1895–1897
Preceded by James J. Martin
Succeeded by Frank Moss
New York State Assembly Minority Leader
In office
January 1, 1883 – December 31, 1883
Preceded by Thomas G. Alvord
Succeeded by Frank Rice
Member of the New York State Assembly
from the Manhattan 21st district
In office
January 1, 1882 – December 31, 1884
Preceded by William J. Trimble
Succeeded by Henry A. Barnum
Personal details
Born Theodore Roosevelt Jr.
October 27, 1858
New York City, New York, U.S.
Died January 6, 1919 (aged 60)
Oyster Bay, New York, U.S.
Resting place Youngs Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay, New York, U.S.
Political party Republican (1880–1911; 1916–1919)
Other political
affiliations Progressive "Bull Moose" (1912–1916)
Spouse(s)

Alice Lee
(m. 1880; her death 1884)
Edith Carow
(m. 1886; his death 1919)

Relations See Roosevelt family
Children Alice, Theodore III, Kermit, Ethel, Archibald, and Quentin
Parents

Theodore Roosevelt Sr. Martha Bulloch Roosevelt

Education Harvard University (A.B.)
Columbia Law School (J.D.)
Profession

Author Conservationist Explorer Historian Naturalist Politician Soldier

Awards Nobel Prize.png Nobel Peace Prize (1906)
Signature Cursive signature in ink
Military career
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch

United States Army
* New York National Guard
Years of service 1882–1886, 1898
Rank US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel
Commands held 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry
Battles/wars Spanish–American War
• Battle of Las Guasimas
• Battle of San Juan Hill
Awards Medal of Honor ribbon.svg Medal of Honor
(Posthumously; 2001)
TheodoreRoosevelt(cropped).jpg This article is part of
a series about
Theodore Roosevelt

Political positions Electoral history

Early life Family The Naval War of 1812

Rough Riders
Battle of San Juan Hill

Governor of New York

Governorship "The Strenuous Life"

Vice President of the United States

1900 McKinley-Roosevelt campaign

"Speak softly and carry a big stick"

President of the United States

Presidency

First term

McKinley assassination 1st inauguration

Square Deal West Wing Coal strike

Booker T. Washington dinner

Venezuela crisis
Roosevelt Corollary

Second term

1904 campaign
Election

2nd inauguration Conservation

Antiquities Act Forest Service

Pure Food and Drug Act

FDA Swift & Co. v. United States

Meat Inspection Act

Treaty of Portsmouth Nobel Prize FBI

Panama Canal Great White Fleet

1912 election

Republican Convention

Progressive Party
Convention New Nationalism Assassination attempt

Post Presidency

African Expedition River of Doubt Expedition

"Citizenship in a Republic" WWI volunteers

Legacy Memorials

President of the United States
Coat of Arms of Theodore Roosevelt.svg

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (/ˈroʊzəvɛlt/ ROH-zə-velt;[a] October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909. He also served as the 25th Vice President of the United States and as the 33rd Governor of New York. As a leader of the Republican Party during this time, he became a driving force for the Progressive Era in the United States in the early 20th century. His face is depicted on Mount Rushmore, alongside those of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln.

Roosevelt was born a sickly child with debilitating asthma, but he successfully overcame his physical health problems by embracing a strenuous lifestyle. He integrated his exuberant personality, vast range of interests, and world-famous achievements into a "cowboy" persona defined by robust masculinity. Home-schooled, he began a lifelong naturalist avocation before attending Harvard College. His book, The Naval War of 1812 (1882), established his reputation as both a learned historian and as a popular writer. Upon entering politics, he became the leader of the reform faction of Republicans in New York's state legislature. Following the near-simultaneous deaths of his wife and mother, he escaped to a cattle ranch in the Dakotas. Roosevelt served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President William McKinley, but resigned from that post to lead the Rough Riders during the Spanish–American War. Returning a war hero, he was elected Governor of New York in 1898. After the death of Vice President Garret Hobart, the New York state party leadership convinced McKinley to accept Roosevelt as his running mate in the 1900 election, moving Roosevelt to the prestigious but powerless role of vice president. Roosevelt campaigned vigorously and the McKinley-Roosevelt ticket won a landslide victory based on a platform of peace, prosperity, and conservatism.

Following McKinley's assassination in September 1901, Roosevelt became president at age 42, and remains the youngest president. As a leader of the Progressive movement, he championed his "Square Deal" domestic policies, promising the average citizen fairness, breaking of trusts, regulation of railroads, and pure food and drugs. Making conservation a top priority, he established a myriad of new national parks, forests, and monuments intended to preserve the nation's natural resources. In foreign policy, he focused on Central America, where he began construction of the Panama Canal. He expanded the Navy and sent the Great White Fleet on a world tour to project the United States' naval power around the globe. His successful efforts to broker the end of the Russo-Japanese War won him the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize. He avoided the controversial tariff and money issues. Elected in 1904 to a full term, Roosevelt continued to promote progressive policies, but many of his efforts and much of his legislative agenda were eventually blocked in Congress. Roosevelt successfully groomed his close friend, William Howard Taft, and Taft won the 1908 presidential election to succeed him. In polls of historians and political scientists, Roosevelt is generally ranked as one of the five best presidents.[2]

Frustrated with Taft's conservatism, Roosevelt belatedly tried to win the 1912 Republican nomination. He failed, walked out, and founded a third party, the Progressive, so-called "Bull Moose" Party, which called for wide-ranging progressive reforms. The split allowed the Democrats to win the White House. Following his election defeat, Roosevelt led a two-year expedition to the Amazon basin, where he nearly died of tropical disease. During World War I, he criticized President Woodrow Wilson for keeping the country out of the war with Germany, and his offer to lead volunteers to France was rejected. Though he had considered running for president again in 1920, Roosevelt's health continued to deteriorate, and he died in 1919.

with my pleasure
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Saturday, September 02, 2017 2:25:49 PM

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A practical thing to do, IMO.
monamagda
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Origin

A proverb advising the tactic of caution and non-aggression, backed up by the ability to do violence if required.

The notion being expressed here is the opposite of the tactics employed by every temporary schoolteacher - who begin stern and tough and, when discipline allows it, become more easy-going. The 'speak softly...' doctrine, like the earlier phrase 'the iron fist in the velvet glove', was to begin gently, but hold a decisive weapon in reserve.

The widespread use of 'speak softly and carry a big stick' began with American president Theodore Roosevelt. In a letter to Henry L. Sprague, on January 26th 1900, he wrote:

"Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far."

Roosevelt claims the phrase to be of West African origin, but I can find no corroborative evidence for that assertion. If it truly was proverbial in 1900 it ought to be easy to find earlier citations of it, but I can find none. Nor is there any record of the phrase actually being used in West Africa before Roosevelt's time. Whether Roosevelt actually believed, for whatever reason, that the expression was West African, or whether he knew that it wasn't and was indulging in a form of 'Confucious he say' hokum in order to impart a degree of distinction to it, we don't know. It is certainly possible that he coined the phrase himself.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/speak-softly-and-carry-a-big-stick.html

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