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Edwin Drake Strikes Oil in Titusville, Pennsylvania (1859) Options
Daemon
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Edwin Drake Strikes Oil in Titusville, Pennsylvania (1859)

In the late 1850s, Drake hired a salt well driller to start digging on a piece of land near Titusville, Pennsylvania. Though oil was known to exist nearby, there was no practical way to extract it, and its primary use was in medicine. In August 1859, Drake struck oil at a depth of 69 feet (21 m), an event that marked the birth of the oil industry. Once a quiet village, Titusville became a bustling town as prospectors flocked to the area. What disaster struck the town more than once? More...
KSPavan
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This Day in History
Edwin Drake Strikes Oil in Titusville, Pennsylvania (1859)
In the late 1850s, Drake hired a salt well driller to start digging on a piece of land near Titusville, Pennsylvania. Though oil was known to exist nearby, there was no practical way to extract it, and its primary use was in medicine. In August 1859, Drake struck oil at a depth of 69 feet (21 m), an event that marked the birth of the oil industry. Once a quiet village, Titusville became a bustling town as prospectors flocked to the area.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Sunday, August 27, 2017 9:27:36 AM

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Titusville, Pennsylvania
Titusville, Pennsylvania
Titusville
City
Titusvillepa.jpg
Official name: City of Titusville
Named for: Jonathan Titus
Motto: "The Valley That Changed The World!"
Nickname: Birthplace of the Oil Industry
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Crawford
Coordinates 41°38′N 79°40′W / 41.633°N 79.667°W
Area 2.9 sq mi (8 km2)
Population 5,601 (2010)
Density 1,931.2 / sq mi (746 / km2)
Founded 1796 [1]
- Incorporated (borough) 6 March 1849 [1]
- Incorporated (city) 28 February 1866 [1]
Government Council–manager
Mayor Esther Smith (R)
Timezone EST (UTC-4)
- summer (DST) EDT (UTC-5)
ZIP Code 16354
Area code 814
Location of Titusville within Pennsylvania
Website: www.cityoftitusvillepa.gov

Titusville is a city in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 5,602 at the 2010 census, and is part of the Meadville, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area. Titusville is where the "modern oil industry began."[2]
History

The area was first settled in 1796 by Jonathan Titus. Within 14 years, others bought and improved the land lying near him, along the banks of the now-named Oil Creek. He named the village Edinburg(h), but as the village grew, the settlers began to call this little hamlet Titusville. The village was incorporated as a borough in 1849.

Lumber was the principal industry with at least 17 sawmills in the area.

The Titusville City Hall and Titusville Historic District are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[3]
Oil rush
Further information: Pennsylvania oil rush
Titusville in 1896, by Thaddeus Mortimer Fowler

Titusville was a slow-growing community until the 1850s, when petroleum was discovered in the region.

Oil was known to exist here, but there was no practical way to extract it. Its main use at that time had been as a medicine for both animals and humans.[citation needed] In the late 1850s Seneca Oil Company (formerly the Pennsylvania Rock Oil Company) sent Col. Edwin L. Drake, to start drilling on a piece of leased land just south of Titusville near what is now Oil Creek State Park.[2] Drake hired a salt well driller, William A. Smith, in the summer of 1859. They had many difficulties, but on August 27 at the site of an oil spring just south of Titusville, they finally drilled a well that could be commercially successful.

Teamsters were needed immediately to transport the oil to markets. Transporting methods improved and in 1862 the Oil Creek & Titusville Railroad was built between Titusville and Corry where it was transferred to other, larger east-west lines. In 1865 pipelines were laid directly to the rail line and the demand for teamsters practically ended. The next year the railroad line was extended south to Petroleum Centre and Oil City. The Union City & Titusville Railroad was built in 1865. That line became part of the Philadelphia & Erie Railroad in 1871. That fall, President U. S. Grant visited Titusville to view this important region.

Other oil-related businesses quickly exploded on the scene. Eight refineries were built between 1862 and 1868. Drilling tools were needed and several iron works were built. Titusville grew from 250 residents to 10,000 almost overnight and in 1866 it incorporated as a city. In 1871, the first oil exchange in the United States was established here. The exchange moved from the city, but returned in 1881 in a new, brick building before being dissolved in 1897.[4]

The first oil millionaire was Jonathan Watson, a resident of Titusville. He owned the land where Drake's well was drilled. He had been a partner in a lumber business prior to the success of the Drake well. At one time it was said that Titusville had more millionaires per 1,000 population than anywhere else in the world.

One resident of note was Franklin S. Tarbell whose large Italianate home still stands. He first moved a few miles south in Venango County and established a wooden stock tank business. About 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Titusville was another oil boom city, Pithole. Oil was discovered in a rolling meadow there in January 1865 and by September 1865 the population was 15,000. But the oil soon ran dry and within four years the city was nearly deserted. Tarbell moved to Titusville in 1870. His daughter, Ida Minerva Tarbell, grew up amidst the sounds and smells of the oil industry. She became an accomplished writer and wrote a series of articles about the business practices of the Standard Oil Company and its president, John D. Rockefeller, which sparked legislative action in Congress concerning monopolies.

with my pleasure
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Sunday, August 27, 2017 9:28:37 AM

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Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 502
Neurons: 48,595
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq
Charles Rolls
Charles Rolls
Charles-Rolls.jpg
Born 27 August 1877
Berkeley Square, London
Died 12 July 1910 (aged 32)
Bournemouth
Nationality United Kingdom
Signature Charles Stewart Rolls Signature.svg
Engineering career
Significant projects Rolls-Royce

Charles Stewart Rolls (27 August 1877 – 12 July 1910) was an English motoring and aviation pioneer. Together with Frederick Henry Royce he co-founded the Rolls-Royce car manufacturing firm. He was the first Briton to be killed in a flying accident, when the tail of his Wright Flyer broke off during a flying display in the Southbourne district of Bournemouth, England. He was aged 32.
Early life
Driving medals won by Rolls, at Monmouth Museum

Rolls was born in Berkeley Square, London, third son of the 1st Baron Llangattock and Lady Llangattock. Despite his London birth, he retained a strong family connection with his ancestral home[1] of The Hendre, near Monmouth, Wales. After attending Mortimer Vicarage Preparatory School in Berkshire, he was educated at Eton College where his developing interest in engines earned him the nickname dirty Rolls.[2]

In 1894 he attended a private crammer in Cambridge which helped him gain entry to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied mechanical and applied science. In 1896, at the age of 18, he travelled to Paris to buy his first car, a Peugeot Phaeton, and joined the Automobile Club of France. His Peugeot is believed to have been the first car based in Cambridge, and one of the first three cars owned in Wales. An early motoring enthusiast, he joined the Self-Propelled Traffic Association which campaigned against the restrictions imposed on motor vehicles by the Locomotive Act, and became a founder member of the Automobile Club of Great Britain with which it merged 1897.[3]

Rolls graduated from Cambridge University - where he won a Half Blue at cycling[4] - in 1898,[5] and began working on the steam yacht Santa Maria followed by a position at the London and North Western Railway in Crewe.[2] However, his talents lay more in salesmanship and motoring pioneering than practical engineering; in January 1903, with the help of £6,600 provided by his father, he started one of Britain's first car dealerships,[6] C.S.Rolls & Co. based in Fulham, to import and sell French Peugeot and Belgian Minerva vehicles.

Rolls was a tall man, standing at about 1.95 m (6'5").

with my pleasure
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Sunday, August 27, 2017 9:29:50 AM

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Joined: 4/19/2017
Posts: 502
Neurons: 48,595
Location: Baghdad, Mayorality of Baghdad, Iraq

George Eliot
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Eliot, George, pseud. of Mary Ann or Marian Evans, 1819–80, English novelist, b. Arbury, Warwickshire. One of the great English novelists, she was reared in a strict atmosphere of evangelical Protestantism but eventually rebelled and renounced organized religion totally. Her early schooling was supplemented by assiduous reading, and the study of languages led to her first literary work, Life of Jesus (1846), a translation from the German of D. F. Strauss

. After her father's death she became subeditor (1851) of the Westminster Review, contributed articles, and came to know many of the literary people of the day. In 1854 she began a long and happy union with G. H. Lewes

, which she regarded as marriage, though it involved social ostracism and could have no legal sanction because Lewes's estranged wife was living. Throughout his life Lewes encouraged Evans in her literary career; indeed, it is possible that without him Evans, subject to periods of depression and in constant need of reassurance, would not have written a word.

In 1856, Mary Ann began Scenes of Clerical Life, a series of realistic sketches first appearing in Blackwood's Magazine under the pseudonym Lewes chose for her, George Eliot. Although not a popular success, the work was well received by literary critics, particularly Dickens and Thackeray. Three novels of provincial life followed—Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), and Silas Marner (1861). She visited Italy in 1860 and again in 1861 before she brought out in the Cornhill Magazine (1862–63) her historical romance Romola, a story of Savonarola

. Felix Holt (1866), a political novel, was followed by The Spanish Gypsy (1868), a dramatic poem. Middlemarch (1871–72), a portrait of life in a provincial town, is considered her masterpiece. She wrote one more novel, Daniel Deronda (1876); the satirical Impressions of Theophrastus Such (1879); and verse, which was never popular and is now seldom read. Lewes died in 1878, and in 1880 she married a close friend of both Lewes and herself, John W. Cross, who later edited George Eliot's Life as Related in Her Letters and Journals (3 vol., 1885–86). Writing about life in small rural towns, George Eliot was primarily concerned with the responsibility that people assume for their lives and with the moral choices they must inevitably make. Although highly serious, her novels are marked by compassion and a subtle humor.

with my pleasure
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