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Bruxism Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 12:00:00 AM
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Bruxism

Derived from the Greek word meaning "gnashing of teeth," bruxism is the habitual, involuntary grinding or clenching of the teeth. Sometimes associated with stress, bruxism is caused by the activation of the reflex portion of the chewing mechanism at a time when higher brain control remains inactive, usually during sleep. Though common and generally harmless, bruxism can cause damage in the form of cracked teeth, indentations, and wear. What drugs are known to cause bruxism as a side effect? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 1:39:25 AM

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Article of the Day
Bruxism
Derived from the Greek word meaning "gnashing of teeth," bruxism is the habitual, involuntary grinding or clenching of the teeth. Sometimes associated with stress, bruxism is caused by the activation of the reflex portion of the chewing mechanism at a time when higher brain control remains inactive, usually during sleep. Though common and generally harmless, bruxism can cause damage in the form of cracked teeth, indentations, and wear.
zina antoaneta
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 3:32:05 AM

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Thank you for the great information!
I have been suffering from sleep bruxism with a severe attrition for a number of years. While present in a mild form during my last years of living in the United States, it suddenly worsened with significant damage to my front teeth as soon as I left the States. As the article mentions, sleep bruxism can be induced by sleep arousals. I suspect that this is what happens in my case.
raghd muhi al-deen
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 8:57:54 AM

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Bruxism
Bruxism
Classification and external resources

Attrition (tooth wear caused by tooth to tooth contact) can be a manifestation of bruxism.
ICD-10 F45.8 ("tooth grinding")
ICD-9 306.8
DiseasesDB 29661
MedlinePlus 001413
MeSH D002012

Bruxism refers to excessive grinding of the teeth and/or excessive clenching of the jaw.[1] Bruxism is an oral parafunctional activity;[1] i.e., not an activity related to normal function such as eating or talking. Bruxism is a common problem: reports of prevalence range from 8–31% in the general population.[2] Even elevated levels of bruxism may cause minimal symptoms, and therefore a bruxer may not be aware of the condition. Several symptoms are commonly associated with bruxism, including hypersensitive teeth, aching jaw muscles, and headaches. Bruxism may cause tooth wear, and may even cause teeth to break and dental restorations (e.g. crowns and fillings) to be repeatedly lost or damaged.[3]

There are two main types of bruxism: that which occurs during sleep (sleep bruxism) and that which occurs during wakefulness (awake bruxism). Damage to the teeth may be similar in both types, but the symptoms of sleep bruxism are usually worst upon waking and improve during the course of the day, and the symptoms of awake bruxism may not be present at all upon waking, and then worsen over the day. The causes of bruxism are not completely understood, but probably involve multiple factors.[4][5] Awake bruxism is thought to have different causes to sleep bruxism, and is more common in females whereas males and females are affected in equal proportions by sleep bruxism.[5] Several treatments are in use, although there is little evidence of robust efficacy for any particular treatment.[6]

with my pleasure
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, August 20, 2017 11:51:51 AM

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Is Your Prescription Causing Bruxism?

19 Aug 2015 by Dr. Adam Hahn

If you are clenching or grinding your teeth at night, it may be due to the medications you have been prescribed. Some medications may lead to an imbalance of certain chemicals in the brain that can cause you to clench or grind your jaw excessively at night. This can lead to jaw pain, headaches, and jaw joint damage that can lead to worsening temporomandibular jaw joint disorder (TMJ).

Antidepressants Are the Most Common Cause

Antidepressants are one of the most prescribed drugs in the US. Although the availability of generic alternatives has knocked these blockbusters from the top 10 in terms of sales, they remain among the most commonly taken drugs, with nearly 11% of Americans taking them.

Several types of antidepressants have been linked to bruxism, including SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) like Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, and their relatives and generic alternatives. SSNRIs (Selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) like Cymbalta have also been associated with bruxism, though less commonly. In rare cases, lithium is sometimes associated with bruxism.

Dopamine Agents

There are several drugs that affect dopamine levels in the brain. These include drugs that are intended to treat Parkinson’s disease, like L-Dopa, and metoclopramide, which is used to treat acid reflux, slow emptying of the stomach, and migraines.

Methylphenidate (Ritalin) is a drug commonly used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and can lead to an increased risk of bruxism.

https://www.tmjtreatmentsc.com/is-your-prescription-causing-bruxism/

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