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MIND in a continuous use Options
prof_question
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2017 10:15:37 AM

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Location: Kharkiv, Kharkivs'ka Oblast', Ukraine
Could you help me, please, with the following verb choise within a certain context: He was walking along a country road and minding his own business when he was knocked down and seriously injured by a minivan. I'm being curious, where it`s appropriate to use a continuous verb form of the language unit "mind" when it refers to the meaning "to be engaged in" instead of "to mean"?
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2017 11:53:41 AM

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prof_question wrote:
Could you help me, please, with the following verb choise within a certain context: He was walking along a country road and minding his own business when he was knocked down and seriously injured by a minivan. I'm being curious, where it`s appropriate to use a continuous verb form of the language unit "mind" when it refers to the meaning "to be engaged in" instead of "to mean"?


I'm afraid I don't understand your question. But as I read your sentence, the conjunction "and" stood out to me and was unexpected. I expected to read, He was walking along a country road, minding his own business, when he was knocked down and seriously injured by a minivan.
prof_question
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2017 2:59:32 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/5/2011
Posts: 63
Neurons: 659
Location: Kharkiv, Kharkivs'ka Oblast', Ukraine
No, it was like this: He was walking and he was minding ....
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2017 5:45:16 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello prof question.

I, also, am a little confused by your question - specifically the fact that I cannot find any definition of the word 'mind' which could seem anything like 'mean'.

In this sentence, 'mind' means 'pay attention to'.

mind vt
22. to pay attention to (something); heed; notice: to mind one's own business.

Collins English Dictionary

It is very often used in the continuous - but can be whichever tense and form fits the sentence:

When you go through the door, you should mind the steps on the other side, don't trip.
He was minding how he walked, so didn't see her across the road.
Mind the baby for a minute while I answer to doorbell.
I always mind my own business.


Like most verbs, the simple present is used for a habit; the simple past is used for one specific time/incident; the progressive present (continuous) is used for something which is happening now - is in progress; and the past progressive is used for something which was in progress when something else happened.

In your sentence, "walking along the road" and "minding his own business" were both in progress at the time he was knocked down.
So both use the progressive.

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