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rhetoric. Options
prolixitysquared
Posted: Friday, June 5, 2009 8:28:00 PM
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What are some of the mostly common rhetoric-heavy words you hear today with any major topics of the year in the news, on tv, etc. ?
Christine
Posted: Friday, June 5, 2009 9:39:15 PM
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You mean..... hard core?
Epiphileon
Posted: Saturday, June 6, 2009 7:12:10 AM

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Christine wrote:
You mean..... hard core?

Yes definitely hard core, industrial strength, intensive, rhetoric.;)
Kat
Posted: Saturday, June 6, 2009 7:31:22 AM
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Do you mean rhetoric such as, "new and improved".
Otherwise, the word "hero" comes to mind, so overused, practically meaningless.
bugdoctor
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 6:33:38 AM
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Change.
Christine
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 10:38:09 AM
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green
Loki
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 12:34:09 PM
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What about "robust"? You know, it sounds strong, durable, and in these uncertain times of change... Heh heh. By the way, if "change" is rhetoric, shouldn't "tradition" be rhetoric too? After all, one only attempts to deny the other.
bugdoctor
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 6:16:31 PM
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When words are acutely defined, I don't think they're rhetoric. Both 'change' and 'tradition' can, therefore, go either way. Tradition, at least, has a reference point. Change by itself can mean anything, and often isn't what we might perceive it to be.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 8:21:54 PM
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Loki wrote:
What about "robust"? You know, it sounds strong, durable, and in these uncertain times of change... Heh heh. By the way, if "change" is rhetoric, shouldn't "tradition" be rhetoric too? After all, one only attempts to deny the other.


'Tradition' is a mostly empty word in my world. It seems flimsy to me, but it's accepted by so many on a regular basis. I suppose it depends what the specific tradition is, but with many, I do not see a legitimate backbone. I have to see evidence of a backbone in order to first trust a concept.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 8:24:04 PM
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Christine wrote:
green


That's certainly a newbie one in today's world. I hadn't thought of it before for the sake of this thread, but it's definitely true. I wonder how long it will last. I've loved this earth and have been recycling and being picky about saving scraps of paper for years. It seems too bandwagon-like now. I really wonder if people care or if they are just convincing themselves that they care because it's the hip thing all of a sudden.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 8:25:18 PM
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Kat wrote:
Do you mean rhetoric such as, "new and improved".
Otherwise, the word "hero" comes to mind, so overused, practically meaningless.


'Rhetoric' as in anything seemingly persuasive which should not need to be so inflated in order for people to believe what it represents.
Christine
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 10:24:07 PM
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prolixitysquared wrote:
Christine wrote:
green


That's certainly a newbie one in today's world. I hadn't thought of it before for the sake of this thread, but it's definitely true. I wonder how long it will last. I've loved this earth and have been recycling and being picky about saving scraps of paper for years. It seems too bandwagon-like now. I really wonder if people care or if they are just convincing themselves that they care because it's the hip thing all of a sudden.


It doesn't matter as long as they do it.Angel
prolixitysquared
Posted: Sunday, June 7, 2009 10:25:39 PM
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Christine wrote:
prolixitysquared wrote:
Christine wrote:
green


That's certainly a newbie one in today's world. I hadn't thought of it before for the sake of this thread, but it's definitely true. I wonder how long it will last. I've loved this earth and have been recycling and being picky about saving scraps of paper for years. It seems too bandwagon-like now. I really wonder if people care or if they are just convincing themselves that they care because it's the hip thing all of a sudden.


It doesn't matter as long as they do it.Angel


That is a good point. I hope it somehow becomes a common habit.
kaliedel
Posted: Monday, June 8, 2009 2:37:57 AM
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If you want to talk politics, "change" is a dead, dead horse thanks to Obama, while "resolve" was beat to death by Bush.
Eihab Fathy
Posted: Monday, June 8, 2009 4:27:12 AM

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onomasiology.
which means:
Branch of semantics: the branch of linguistics that studies how meaning is expressed.

I read this in the same forum.
early_apex
Posted: Monday, June 8, 2009 3:42:32 PM
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prolixitysquared wrote:
What are some of the mostly common rhetoric-heavy words you hear today with any major topics of the year in the news, on tv, etc. ?


Chilling is a word that most people associate with white wine, but in news-speak it always refers to a scenario.

I guess someone once used the phrase "of Biblical proportions" to refer to a flood or a plague of locusts, but the phrase keeps appearing in other contexts. My Bible is printed on pretty thin paper, and is actually smaller than my dictionary. Thus, "of dictionary proportions" would be an even greater event.

I assume there is a list of well-accepted adjectives that newspeople all use, such that accidents are always tragic, fires and floods are always devastating, and statistics, if noteworthy at all, are alarming.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Tuesday, June 9, 2009 8:57:52 AM
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kaliedel wrote:
If you want to talk politics, "change" is a dead, dead horse thanks to Obama, while "resolve" was beat to death by Bush.


Yes, I think it's a shame how beaten 'change' has become in the past year or so. The idea behind the word is positive, but now the word itself seems to be limp.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Tuesday, June 9, 2009 9:13:19 AM
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early_apex wrote:
prolixitysquared wrote:
What are some of the mostly common rhetoric-heavy words you hear today with any major topics of the year in the news, on tv, etc. ?


Chilling is a word that most people associate with white wine, but in news-speak it always refers to a scenario.

I guess someone once used the phrase "of Biblical proportions" to refer to a flood or a plague of locusts, but the phrase keeps appearing in other contexts. My Bible is printed on pretty thin paper, and is actually smaller than my dictionary. Thus, "of dictionary proportions" would be an even greater event.

I assume there is a list of well-accepted adjectives that newspeople all use, such that accidents are always tragic, fires and floods are always devastating, and statistics, if noteworthy at all, are alarming.


Just picturing news-speak people talking with quite a speed and using the word 'chilling' in that context makes my head ache.
vr091073
Posted: Wednesday, June 10, 2009 2:43:54 PM
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Down here underneath southern latitudes, there was, at the height of the economic cataclysm in the northern hemisphere in the latter part of 2008, a massive overkill job done in trying to convince the denizens of this exiguous dot in the middle of the ocean that the local economy was more or less unaffected, with a specific word, namely 'resilience,' regurgitated ad nauseam, in respect of how the crisis was supposedly being successfully averted. Now that the recessionary wave has caught up with the island, that term appears to have vanished as fast as it came in vogue.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Wednesday, June 10, 2009 9:00:13 PM
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vr091073 wrote:
Down here underneath southern latitudes, there was, at the height of the economic cataclysm in the northern hemisphere in the latter part of 2008, a massive overkill job done in trying to convince the denizens of this exiguous dot in the middle of the ocean that the local economy was more or less unaffected, with a specific word, namely 'resilience,' regurgitated ad nauseam, in respect of how the crisis was supposedly being successfully averted. Now that the recessionary wave has caught up with the island, that term appears to have vanished as fast as it came in vogue.


It's such a shame when words become trite. Overuse is hard to take.
franziska
Posted: Thursday, June 11, 2009 7:57:40 AM

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What about "challenge"? If I hear just one more time the trite expression "I think of this (job, situation, relationship, workplace etc etc...) as a challenge, I think I'll scream.
early_apex
Posted: Thursday, June 11, 2009 9:04:27 AM
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franziska wrote:
What about "challenge"? If I hear just one more time the trite expression "I think of this (job, situation, relationship, workplace etc etc...) as a challenge, I think I'll scream.


Don't look now, but we have a car named "Challenger" which has just become an Italian car!
prolixitysquared
Posted: Saturday, June 13, 2009 4:12:26 PM
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franziska wrote:
What about "challenge"? If I hear just one more time the trite expression "I think of this (job, situation, relationship, workplace etc etc...) as a challenge, I think I'll scream.


It's such a shame when valuable words are used so excessively that they become trite to the ear.
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