mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Acquaintance, n.: A person whom we know well enough to borrow from, but not well enough to lend to. A degree of friendship... Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 33,686
Neurons: 100,236
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Acquaintance, n.: A person whom we know well enough to borrow from, but not well enough to lend to. A degree of friendship called slight when its object is poor or obscure, and intimate when he is rich or famous.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914)
kitten
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 2:35:22 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/28/2009
Posts: 2,463
Neurons: 7,420
Location: the city by the bay
Daemon wrote:
Acquaintance, n.: A person whom we know well enough to borrow from, but not well enough to lend to. A degree of friendship called slight when its object is poor or obscure, and intimate when he is rich or famous. Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914)



The above quote comes from The Devil's Dictionary. Below is the preface as well as the dictionary proper.


AUTHOR'S PREFACE

The Devil's Dictionary was begun in a weekly paper in 1881, and was continued in a desultory way at long intervals until 1906. In that year a large part of it was published in covers with the title The Cynic's Word Book, a name which the author had not the power to reject or happiness to approve. To quote the publishers of the present work:

"This more reverent title had previously been forced upon him by the religious scruples of the last newspaper in which a part of the work had appeared, with the natural consequence that when it came out in covers the country already had been flooded by its imitators with a score of 'cynic' books—The Cynic's This, The Cynic's That, and The Cynic's t'Other. Most of these books were merely stupid, though some of them added the distinction of silliness. Among them, they brought the word 'cynic' into disfavor so deep that any book bearing it was discredited in advance of publication."

Meantime, too, some of the enterprising humorists of the country had helped themselves to such parts of the work as served their needs, and many of its definitions, anecdotes, phrases and so forth, had become more or less current in popular speech. This explanation is made, not with any pride of priority in trifles, but in simple denial of possible charges of plagiarism, which is no trifle. In merely resuming his own the author hopes to be held guiltless by those to whom the work is addressed—enlightened souls who prefer dry wines to sweet, sense to sentiment, wit to humor and clean English to slang.

A conspicuous, and it is hoped not unpleasant, feature of the book is its abundant illustrative quotations from eminent poets, chief of whom is that learned and ingenius cleric, Father Gassalasca Jape, S.J., whose lines bear his initials. To Father Jape's kindly encouragement and assistance the author of the prose text is greatly indebted.

A.B.



THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY--by Ambrose Bierce




Please thank www.guteberg.org for the above information.


peace out, >^,,^<
IMcRout
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 3:19:02 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,380
Neurons: 563,379
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Thank you, guteNberg.org
Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 8:11:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/10/2009
Posts: 1,647
Neurons: 4,678
As with so many of Ambrose Bierce's definitions,this one too is a pithy kernel of truth.
MTC
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 8:24:25 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/18/2011
Posts: 2,780
Neurons: 8,606
A pin to pretension's balloon.
DarkMoon
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 9:50:27 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/22/2009
Posts: 16,657
Neurons: 46,684
Ambrose Bierce's definitions of friendship and friendless are equally evocative and picturesque. From The Devil's Dictionary:

FRIENDSHIP, n. A ship big enough to carry two in fair weather, but only one in foul.

The sea was calm and the sky was blue;
Merrily, merrily sailed we two.
(High barometer maketh glad.)
On the tipsy ship, with a dreadful shout,
The tempest descended and we fell out.
(O the walking is nasty bad!)
—Armit Huff Bettle

FRIENDLESS, adj. Having no favors to bestow. Destitute of fortune. Addicted to utterance of truth and common sense.
kitten
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 2:28:08 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/28/2009
Posts: 2,463
Neurons: 7,420
Location: the city by the bay
IMcRout wrote:
Thank you, guteNberg.org



Thank you very much IMcRout for adding the 'n' to gutenberg.d'oh! Good grief >>>>> I certainly don't want to send anyone to or credit the wrong site.Shame on you

'Ta muchly.Angel


peace out, >^,,^<
Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Thursday, July 14, 2011 10:13:50 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/10/2009
Posts: 1,647
Neurons: 4,678
To Darkmoon:

Thank-you for the quotes on "friendship" and the "friendless"...:)
DarkMoon
Posted: Friday, July 15, 2011 7:01:23 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/22/2009
Posts: 16,657
Neurons: 46,684
You're welcome, Marissa. I think that definitions from The Devil's Dictionary are worth reading and mulling them over, hence the link enclosed. :)
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.