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TheParser
Posted: Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:01:12 AM
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No. 19


1. There is a rare and potentially deadly eye cancer called retinoblastoma.

2. In the past, if the cancer did not respond well to treatment, survival required removing the cancerous eye.

3. In some cultures, some parents let their children die rather than suffer the stigma of disfiguration.

4. In 2006, Dr. David Abramson in New York City started using a new technique to treat this cancer.

5. It is now used in 45 countries.

6. Doctors can now save 95% of eyes afflicted with that cancer.

7. Dr. Abramson will not make a penny off his new technique because he has refused to patent it.

8. "[O]ur goal was to help children. Our driving force in this was not to make money."



Source of this inspiring story: READER'S DIGEST, October, 2017.


whatson
Posted: Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:39:53 AM
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*
Re No. 19

How unTrumpish!

I am a lay-about.
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:45:03 AM

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whatson wrote:
*
Re No. 19

How unTrumpish!


whatson is suffering OCD.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
TheParser
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 7:41:50 AM
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No. 20

Today I learned a new word -- thanks to a world leader who is currently not too popular in many countries.

This world leader criticized another world leader who is not popular with many people, either.

The first leader used the word "dotard" to describe the second leader.

It is an old word that refers to an elderly person who is senile.
tunaafi
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 7:54:22 AM

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Whistle
Y111
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 8:04:51 AM
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TheParser wrote:

The first leader used the word "dotard" to describe the second leader.

It is an old word that refers to an elderly person who is senile.

If it was Kim Jong-Un speaking about Trump, did he do it in English? If not, then the person who used the word was his translator, i.e. a third man (or woman).
TheParser
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 11:00:43 AM
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Y111 wrote:
If not, then the person who used the word was his translator.



Excellent point!

"Professor" Google told me that Marshal Kim used the Korean word "neukdari," which is often translated as "imbecile."

The translator chose that old word (used in the 14th century) "dotard."

*****

Wikipedia taught me that as a child, Marshal Kim attended school in (beautiful and orderly) Switzerland. [Those words in parentheses are mine, not Wikipedia's. I so envy the Swiss for their wonderful little well-run country. OK, OK, back to the topic.]

Wikipedia says he attended various schools, including one that apparently taught classes in English. He was described as a rather shy boy but very nice and modest about his family.

Who knows. Maybe if President Trump and Marshal Kim had a heart-to-heart chat, President Trump could bring out the good that once existed in that previously nice and modest little boy.
Y111
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 12:50:18 PM
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TheParser wrote:

Who knows. Maybe if President Trump and Marshal Kim had a heart-to-heart chat, President Trump could bring out the good that once existed in that previously nice and modest little boy.

Maybe. However, he will have to play his role anyway. I've read about some liberalization in North Korea recently. But even if he'd like to go further with it, he can't simply say, "OK, people, all that we've been doing was bullshit, let's dump it and go West". Something like that led to the collapse of the USSR, which was a disaster for many of its citizens. Many people died, many weren't born because of it, many suffered. That was definitely not the way to do it. Had it been done in stages, now the USSR would probably be closer to democracy than its pieces are. Instead, many people, at least in Russia, now associate democracy with the chaos, poverty, criminality and ethnic wars of the years that followed Perestroika. That's why Gorbachev is hated by many Russians and why Putin is respected.
coag
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 3:48:15 PM

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TheParser wrote:
"Professor" Google told me that Marshal Kim used the Korean word "neukdari," which is often translated as "imbecile."
The translator chose that old word (used in the 14th century) "dotard."

If Marshal Kim finds out that the meaning of his word has been weakened, he'll execute the translator. (Marshal Kim executed his uncle.)

The choice of "dotard" may be a simple translation mistake. (It is a translation mistake, if TheParser, as a native speaker, didn't know the word.)
Maybe the translator searched the Internet, got a couple of English synonyms, and simply picked one which is not adequate.

Any way, English as a second language can be a dangerous business.
almo 1
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 4:44:21 PM
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coag wrote:
TheParser wrote:
"Professor" Google told me that Marshal Kim used the Korean word "neukdari," which is often translated as "imbecile."
The translator chose that old word (used in the 14th century) "dotard."

If Marshal Kim finds out that the meaning of his word has been weakened, he'll execute the translator. (Marshal Kim executed his uncle.)

The choice of "dotard" may be a simple translation mistake. (It is a translation mistake, if TheParser, as a native speaker, didn't know the word.)
Maybe the translator searched the Internet, got a couple of English synonyms, and simply picked one which is not adequate.

Any way, English as a second language can be a dangerous business.






Kim Jong-un got rid of his half-brother Kim Jong Nam too.



rollingstone.com/culture/north-koreas-chemical-weapon-inside-deadly-vx-attack





Siti Aishah, seen wearing her "LOL" shirt, is suspected in the murder of Kim Jong Nam.







Rollingstone magazine has changed.
But it still has some good article sometimes like this:
rollingstone.com/culture/news/the-neverending-nightmare-of-amanda-knox






almo 1
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 5:39:56 PM
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almo 1
Posted: Friday, September 22, 2017 10:36:01 PM
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Location: Fussa, Tokyo, Japan




North Korea has a history of using creative language to express its loathing for...

By Norm Coleman
(Republican Norm Coleman represented Minnesota in the U.S. Senate from 2003 to 2009. He serves as a board member of the National Endowment for Democracy...)





edition.cnn.com/2016/03/31/opinions/north-korea








TheParser
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 8:39:06 AM
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Thank you, Y111. Coag, and Almo, for your informative contributions.

1. We have to be VERY careful about what we read regarding the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

a. International reporters are not allowed the freedom to go anywhere they want to when they are permitted to enter the DPRK.
b. Much information is based on rumor.


2. Yes, Y111.

I have read that the leaders of the People's Republic of China are loath to grant more political freedoms, citing the chaos that followed the collapse of the USSR.

I have read that many (most?) Chinese people are content to let the Communist Party continue its dictatorship in exchange for personal freedom and economic prosperity. China does allow Chinese students to attend American universities, and China does allow its citizens to visit the West. Perhaps eventually China will find a way to expand "democracy with Chinese characteristics."

When the Chinese see the vicious treatment of our democratically elected president, I can understand why Chinese leaders are loath to permit media freedom.

Americans can no longer boast of having an impartial media.



A nice weekend to you all!


tunaafi
Posted: Saturday, September 23, 2017 1:52:20 PM

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TheParser wrote:
When the Chinese see the vicious treatment of our democratically elected president, I can understand why Chinese leaders are loath to permit media freedom.

So, are you in favour of restrictions on the press on the USA?
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, September 24, 2017 7:31:22 AM
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No. 21

DO YOU LIKE CAVIAR?

"The world's best fish eggs don't come from Russia [or Iran], even though no one wants to say it."

Where do they come from?

Answer: China.

*****

Many people have a "low trust of Chinese food safety."

One Chinese company that produces caviar has overcome this fear.

Its caviar is served in "21 of the 26 Michelin three-starred restaurants in Paris."

Its caviar was "even part of President Obama's meal at the 2016 Group of 20 summit."

This Chinese company turns out 60 tons of caviar per year, making it the largest producer in the world, according to the company."



(I have quoted from an article entitled "The Chinese Caviar Connection" by Kate Krader in the September 25, 2017, print edition of Bloomberg Businessweek.)
coag
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 2:53:41 PM

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Wait till Vlad hears this. He derailed an American presidential election, he'll derail Chinese caviar. Vlad will restore the reputation of Russian
caviar.

PS

I tried caviar once and I didn't like it.
Y111
Posted: Monday, September 25, 2017 11:48:33 PM
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coag wrote:

I tried caviar once and I didn't like it.

It was a mistake to write this. What if Vlad reads it and gets offended because he thinks you meant Russian caviar? Shhh
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 5:05:27 AM
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Thanks, Coag and Y111, for your humorous contributions.

Being a plebeian, I have never, ever thought about eating caviar.

In fact, the idea of eating fish eggs sounds disgusting to me.

Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, September 26, 2017 11:31:54 PM

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Quote Parser:When the Chinese see the vicious treatment of our democratically elected president, I can understand why Chinese leaders are loath to permit media freedom.

Americans can no longer boast of having an impartial media.


The word should be presidents - plural. There have been many presidents who have been treated viciously. I said back in the nineties that it must be awful to be an American citizen and realize what they might do to an ordinary citizen if they treat their presidents so carelessly. Clinton, Bush, Obama, and Trump. I didn't pay much attention before that except that they did have a tendency to kill or try to kill their presidents and their senators.


Unfortunately with the advent of the internet, the disease of leader bashing is spreading to Canada.

::::

No matter where one lives, one can read several sources and be able to recognize whether the bias is left or right and how far. Journalists are human too and they do have likes and dislikes which may become evident in even their choice of subject, let alone the words they choose.

Here's a link to an article about the principles of journalism that they strive for.


https://www.americanpressinstitute.org/journalism-essentials/what-is-journalism/elements-journalism/



The past is to be respected/acknowledged, not worshipped. It is in our future we will find our greatness. Pierre Trudeau
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, September 27, 2017 7:49:57 PM
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Actually, what the Chinese think of the American President had been widely publicised across the world. Just not on Fox or in Bannon's rag, it would seem.

So most people who read this are already aware of what the Chinese think about Trump. And it certainly does not include any feeling of outrage at his treatment at the hands of media - American or otherwise!

You do realise that if Trump makes any military move against N.Korea, China will stand against America, don't you?

And that China is not some backward little place full of sweat shops and quaint, polite people?

Surely you've heard or read or seen, by now, that China's respect for America's leaders - never very robust - has (again, this is widely reported)disappeared? The person you keep telling us we must respect has irredeemably "Lost Face" in a nation of 1.6 billion people. The same people who manufacture all Trump's Family merchandise and America's clothing, cars, computers, components, white goods, furniture - and to whom America (including the Trump family) is vastly, humungously, in debt?

While one understands completely that you want to be the 'voice' of those who support Trump; making comments like the one above is naive at best, but strays so far away from the reality of what's going on between China and the Trump Administration, that at worst it's deliberate deception.

Look, there's a terrible mess going on at present. Everywhere. Floods, devastation, nuclear threats, a reorganisation of the various axes of power across the world;monetary scandals, racial problems and power-plays are rending the USA.

OK, so there are differing ideas on WHY there's a mess. And certainly we here are all aware of which side of the Great Divide the other is on. But to keep on pretending that everything is just going on as normal and Chinese leaders - of all people - would join together to lament or be outraged by the media coverage on the Man of a Thousand Nicknames; that is almost surreal.

Things have changed, stuff is happening on a daily basis, and to pretend ignorance of that is, well, it's not reality, is it? Can we all not at least agree on the reality of now?



Islami
Posted: Thursday, September 28, 2017 6:11:37 AM
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One day in Contract Law class, the professor asked one of his better students, "Now if you were to give someone an orange, how would you go about it?"

The student replied, "Here's an orange."


The professor was livid. "No! No! Think like a lawyer!"

The student then recited, "Okay, I'd tell him, 'I hereby give and convey to you all and singular, my estate and interests, rights, claim, title, claim and advantages of and in, said orange, together with all its rind, juice, pulp, and seeds, and all rights and advantages with full power to bite, cut, freeze and otherwise eat, the same, or give the same away with and without the pulp, juice, rind and seeds, anything herein before or hereinafter or in any deed, or deeds, instruments of whatever nature or kind whatsoever to the contrary in anywise notwithstanding..."

Just because the writer of an article is British doesn't mean that they use English correctly-DragOnspeaker.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, October 1, 2017 8:49:50 AM
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No. 22


OCTOPUSES


"Octopuses are the closest we can come, on earth, to know what it might be like to encounter intelligent aliens."

-- Amia Srinivasen


A 2010 "EU [European Union] directive ... classified cephalopods with vertebrates, because of their 'ability to experience pain.' "

-- Gavin Francis

In 1993, a British official "gave the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, the status of a 'protected animal.' "

-- Gavin Francis



Source: From the letters column in the print edition of the London Review of Books (September 21, 2017).

coag
Posted: Sunday, October 1, 2017 5:28:55 PM

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I had to check the Etymology Dictionary for the "pus" part.

'pous "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot."'

So, etymologically speaking, "octopus" means eight feet.

The comment about the plural of the word, is interesting.
"Proper plural is octopodes, though octopuses probably works better in English. Octopi (1817) is from mistaken assumption that -us in this word is the Latin noun ending that takes -i in plural."

This TheParser's tidbit reminded me of the James Bond movie Octopussy.


I couldn't refrain from posting this picture of the glamorous girls from the movie. I thought some forum members might like it.
TheParser
Posted: Monday, October 2, 2017 8:13:03 AM
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Thanks for the interesting and informative contribution, Coag.
coag
Posted: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 3:23:04 PM

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Hello TheParser,

There's no need to thank me. I am an English learner, I am a beneficiary of your posts. I should be thanking you, and other teachers, on this forum.

Thanks for your interesting and useful posts.

coag
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, October 5, 2017 5:21:25 AM

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A bit of threadjacking:

*ped- "foot" can be seen in the French word Pétanque (you must all know this ball game ;-)

It comes from Provençal (or Occitan, if you like) words pied tangues, meaning feet together.
The earlier ball games in France allowed the ball thrower to take running steps before the throw, but in pétanque you must keep your feet inside a small ring during the cast.





In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
TheParser
Posted: Thursday, October 5, 2017 5:54:03 AM
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coag wrote:


There's no need to thank me.







In my OPINION, native speakers should definitely thank you learners.

Without you learners, the gems of this website ("Vocabulary" and "Grammar") would not exist.

I have always found you to be a very courteous person even when you may have disagreed with me.

I was brought up to always be as polite as possible to people who are polite to me.

So I do thank you very much whenever you decide to contribute to my threads.


Have a nice day!


********************


No. 23


We all know that "Uncle Sam" is the nickname for the United States of America.

Just as "John Bull" is the nickname for England.

Well, about an hour ago, I learned for the first time in my 80 years that there used to be another nickname for the United States.

According to the 1957 edition of the famous Encyclopaedia Britannica, this other nickname "was applied as an epithet of derision to American revolutionaries by the British."

That long-lost nickname is Brother Jonathan.
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 11:27:17 AM
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No. 24


A SPECIAL KIND OF RAZOR


You come to visit California and stay in a rural area.

You are sleeping when you hear some hoofbeats outside your window.

Should you immediately think "horses" or "zebras"?

The answer for most people would be: Horses, of course.


*****

There is a theory that says the simplest answer is usually the correct answer.

The theory is called Occam's razor.


*****

Its philosophical basis is too difficult for me to understand. You can find out more by first checking the Wikipedia article.

Well, I have to leave the computer now.

Which reason should you think? (1) He has to leave because President Trump is calling him, (2) He has to leave because he is getting a tattoo, or (3) He has to leave because he needs to wash the dirty dishes.

According to Occam's razor, the correct answer is pretty obvious.

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 2:26:13 PM

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TheParser wrote:
No. 24


A SPECIAL KIND OF RAZOR


You come to visit California and stay in a rural area.

You are sleeping when you hear some hoofbeats outside your window.

Should you immediately think "horses" or "zebras"?

The answer for most people would be: Horses, of course.


*****

There is a theory that says the simplest answer is usually the correct answer.

The theory is called Occam's razor.


*****

Its philosophical basis is too difficult for me to understand. You can find out more by first checking the Wikipedia article.

Well, I have to leave the computer now.

Which reason should you think? (1) He has to leave because President Trump is calling him, (2) He has to leave because he is getting a tattoo, or (3) He has to leave because he needs to wash the dirty dishes.

According to Occam's razor, the correct answer is pretty obvious.



As Sir Arthur Conan Doyle put it in the Sherlock Holmes stories:

Quote:
“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
TheParser
Posted: Saturday, October 14, 2017 5:07:46 PM
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Sarrriesfan wrote:


As Sir Arthur Conan Doyle put it in the Sherlock Holmes stories:

Quote:
“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”



For older Americans, there is only one actor they think of when speaking of motion pictures featuring the adventures of that detective: the great Basil Rathbone.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, October 15, 2017 4:28:58 AM

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TheParser wrote:
Sarrriesfan wrote:


As Sir Arthur Conan Doyle put it in the Sherlock Holmes stories:

Quote:
“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”



For older Americans, there is only one actor they think of when speaking of motion pictures featuring the adventures of that detective: the great Basil Rathbone.


He is one of my favourite actors to portray Holmes, although Jeremy Brett is probably the one I like the most.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, October 15, 2017 7:35:42 AM
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For me, there is only one actor who can portray Hercule Poirot: David Suchet.

Whenever I see a movie listing that mentions another actor in the role, I cannot bring myself to watch it.



TheParser
Posted: Friday, October 20, 2017 7:58:01 AM
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No. 25

WHAT KIND OF FOOD PERSON ARE YOU?



1. If you appreciate fine dining, you are a gourmet/epicure/bon vivant.

2. If you have a healthy but unrefined appetite, you are a gourmand/trencherman.

3. If you know the history and rituals of haute cuisine, you are a gastronome.



Source: American (print) edition of Reader's Digest for November, 2017.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 6:40:02 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom



It's useful to know that today Nos 1 and 3 would be called "Foodies". Even Festivals devoted to cuisine (which we seem to have every month here in Brighton!) are called "Foodie Festivals" nowadays.

I've not seen/heard "gourmand" used literally in modern English - we just tend to call people who eat too much unhealthy!Dancing
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 11:28:24 AM

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TheParser wrote:
No. 25

WHAT KIND OF FOOD PERSON ARE YOU?


2. If you have a healthy but unrefined appetite, you are a gourmand/trencherman.


A trencherman is so called because a trencher is the name for a type of round loaf of bread that was used to serve food on in the Middle Ages, traditionally the bread would be given to the poor as alms after the meal. But an unrefined person would eat the loaf and not give it to the poor.

Lat a trencher became the name for a wooden plate.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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